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2018-04 16

[Student]A Lion in the Sky

As of February 2018, there are more than 30 countries worldwide depending on nuclear power, with about 510 reactors and 160 currently in development. Moreover, there are five remaining Nuclear Weapon States (NWS) in the world. Despite the huge amount of electricity that nuclear reactors generate, the world is heading towards nonproliferation and inhibition of further development due to various security and health issues that could potentially affect everyone on the planet. The Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology's (KAIST's) Nuclear Nonproliferation Education and Research Center (NEREC) offers a scholarship to a limited number of excellent students in Korea, and Jung Yu-jin (Political Science and International Studies, Master’s program) was the first Hanyangian to be nominated in its three-year history. News H met Jung on a lovely spring afternoon. Nuclear nonproliferation One of the main agendas in the quest for international security is nuclear proliferation, due to the terrorizing destructiveness of the weapon. Although it is left in the hands of international relations professionals, many social science students face a psychological barrier when dealing with the technical aspect of the nuclear energy. Understanding the highly complicated process of nuclear division and the fundamentals of weaponizing it or using it as a power source is somewhat critical, setting a limit for social science students. The same applies for nuclear engineering students too. KAIST, one of the leading science institutes, along with Hanyang University, in Korea, founded the NEREC fellowship program aiming to co-research with social science majors in their master's or doctoral program on the issue of nuclear nonproliferation. Counting its third year in 2018, the research fellows have come from various prestigious schools, while Jung is the first Hanyangian member of the group. Jung submitted a research plan with the focus on international nuclear nonproliferation policies in relation to hegemony (leadership or dominance by one country). “The details of the paper will constantly change in the process,” mentioned Jung. The research fellows will conduct their own research until October, having monthly meetings with their academic advisors. A screen capture of Jung's personal webpage. Her biography and past experiences are well organized. (https://sites.google.com/view/yujinjuliajung/) (Photo courtesy of Jung) International politics as a life career Jung first found her interest in the field when she volunteered at the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit. “I was a third year Policy Studies student, who only knew that this summit was internationally significant but nothing else,” smiled Jung. By having the chance to closely observe the decision making and conference process, her academic interest in nuclear policies grew. This led her to join the Work English Study Travel (WEST) program to work in big organizations that are based in Washington D.C. “When I was working for the Voice of America, I was able to interview and march with the people who support affirmative action. The experience helped me a lot when studying American politics later on,” mentioned Jung. As such, she persued her interest in international politics and nuclear policies trying to experience as much as she could. “I decided to study further after such experiences, especially at Hanyang where the faculty is great and I feel comfortable,” emphasized Jung. She also mentioned that watching theories being applied to real life helped her to cultivate her academic imagination and still inspires her so much. Because studying and experiencing international politics is so exciting for Jung, she plans to apply to begin studying for her doctorate degree this year. “I should focus on the research project in NEREC and my graduation paper; then I look forward to working in research facilities in Korea before I set off to the U.S. for my doctorate degree,” planned Jung with sparkling eyes. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-03 20

[Student]Two Chinese Goblins

From February 9th to 25th, South Korea hosted the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang. As the 23rd Winter Olympics were to be held in a country perennially making headlines with their brothers in the North, it caught the special attention of manywho wondered how the country known for its rapid growth and technology would host the international event. Luckily, South Korea’s usage of 1,218 drones and other jaw-dropping performances satisfied the high expectations of global eyes. Out of all the Hanyang Univeristy (HYU) students that participated in the opening performance of the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, there were only two Chinese foreign students, Liu Tianyi (刘天艺, Department of Dance) and Chen Tianxiao (陈天笑, Graduate School of Dance), who were nominated to be part of the crew. How It All Began Liu and Chen were not just students with natural talent. Ever since they were little, they attended arts and dance schools where they would train in traditional Chinese dance everyday. Before attending Hanyang’s graduate school, Chen had majored in dance at a Chinese university. By then he was already a renowned dance prodigy, as he had started officially performing from the age of 16. His first and very well-known performance was, in fact, on the opening stage of the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, right when the Olympic Torch relay arrived in Yangzhou. As a passionate and talented student, he also attended a dance competition held in Korea, where he began his new passion for modern dance, and chose to study in Korea. Liu (left) and Chen (right) As for Liu, she had an exceptional interest in Korea and its culture ever since she was young. She started studying Korean when she was 14 with the help of her many Korean friends in Qingdao. Having studied traditional dance for more than 10 years, she also grew interested in modern dance after watching a performance on television. “The field of modern dance feels quite different as it is of Western origin. I really like how it allows me to use my body creatively, and as Korea is more advanced in this field, and especially since Hanyang University (HYU) is one of the top ranking schools for arts and performances, I decided to apply to this school,” said Liu. Passion for dance When asked how they first started, Chen simply replied that he has always loved dancing, and that he believed dance is the best form of language there can be. However, Liu gave an unexpected answer, saying, “when I was little, I didn’t really have a neck. My mom was worried about my short neck so she made me start dancing and stretching. Luckily, I now have one.” With laughs and jokes aside, Liu also showed her passion for dance, calling it the expression of connection between art and the soul. She emphasized how she wanted to show other students that she was giving her all everyday to get to where she is now, and to also achieve her goals in the future. "I now have a neck!" (Photo courtesy of Liu) With their drive and years of practice, the two dancers really stood out. They were recommended by Professor Son, an influential professor within the department, to perform on the opening stage of the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. After months of strictly confidential practices under harsh weather conditions, they successfully performed as Korean traditional goblins alongside the world’s top ranking and renowned Korean dance group. “It wasn’t easy. Pyeongchang was so cold that it took a lot of energy just to stay focused. One of the students was severely injured while practicing and ended up having to take a long break from dancing entirely,” said Liu. Future discourse Already having gained popularity and recognition in the dance field, Chen talked in detail about his dream of becoming a choreographer. “In the future, I want to try fusing Chinese and Korean dance together. It would be interesting to see bits of traditional and modern elements in a performance. In that sense, I want to live in Korea because it’s a more efficient environment.” For Liu, despite her passion for dance, her dream is to become a Chinese-Korean translator. “I love dance, but I love Korea as well. I have been in love with the culture and language ever since I was little, and I’m now thinking about attending graduate school for this next step,” said Liu. Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-03 19

[Student]Proud Achievements as a Foreigner

On the 1st of February, certificates were given to those on the Dean’s List of Research Records, in the HIT Building. Run by the Industry-University Cooperation Foundation, the research results of graduate school students from January to December were reviewed. Awards were given in three different categories to 12 students in total. Out of these outstanding performers, an international student stood out. Successful research achieved in another country Xing Jiuqiang (Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Engineering, Integrated Master’s – Doctor’s Program) was a proud Chinese Hanyangian on the Dean’s list, as an outstanding researcher. Hanyang University (HYU) is constantly helping and supporting students to make the best research results as the future leaders of the world, as creative and talented people are required in this fourth industrial revolution era. Out of the many graduate students working and researching day and night, Xing proudly put his name on the list. Xing proudly put his name on the Dean's list. “I am so honored to receive this award, even though I went through such hardships as an international student in HYU,” started off Xing. 2018 is his sixth year in Korea, away from his home country. “I’m still not fluent in Korean and still working in my research. I am very thankful I received such a meaningful award even though I am still working on my research,” said Xing. Xing researched the biological purification of underwater pollutive chemicals using microalgae. As this is his 5th year since 2014, he has continued on his research in great depth. His professor, Jeon Byong-hun (Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Engineering), led him to try and study in a range of areas, eventually leading to Xing’s success. “I not only concentrated on chemicals, but also researched on wastewater and other pollutive substances. There are also various types of algae, which gives more chances of different results,” explained Xing. Life of an international student The life of a Chinese student in Korea was tough with a high language barrier. Xing started learning Korean in a language school in Korea, from the very beginning. “I couldn’t even order a single menu item in the cafeteria at first. I had so many difficulties to solve the basic things I needed in life,” reminisced Xing. In an unfamiliar land with an unfamiliar language, he was able to meet a reassuring mentor, Professor Jeon. “I call him my father. He was such a big help to me,” commented Xing. A picture of Xing with his lab members. (Photo courtesy of Xing) Xing started his career in the Bioenergy and Environmental Remediation Laboratory since March of 2014, following Professor Jeon. The professor came as a great help to Xing both emotionally and academically. “Even in my research, there were a lot of things I wouldn’t even have thought of if it weren't for Professor Jeon,” reminisced Xing. Xing’s life is still tough, both as a foreigner and a as graduate school student. “I come to school around 10 in the morning and go back home late at night. I used to be extremely frustrated due to the fallacies in my research. Now, I’m enjoying every single moment,” said Xing. Graduate school research isn’t something everyone can do. Therefore, even for Xing, endless trials and errors were required to proceed with his research. He had to spend weeks to deduct a result he wished. Xing commented that he is now familiar with his work and is enjoying it. Xing is planning to continue on with his research. He still has a lot to do in front of him. “I want to continue my career in molecular organisms. I want to go back to China as a great researcher,” said Xing. His dream motivated him to carry on. He, as an international student in Korea, will again try his best to achieve the best he can. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myeong

2018-02 04

[Student]Finding Companions in What They Love

Countless Hanyangians are holding on to unique hobbies and interests along with their studies with passion. Some, with this passion, have recruited other Hanyangians with the same interests and have formed unique gatherings, which are differentiated from the preexisting school clubs in the sense that they are less formal and do not require the school’s recognition. News H met with three of these gatherings: HyES, Han-tteok and Hy-beer. Who wants to play games with me? “I actually tried to start this gathering back in 2014 with my passion towards games. I just didn’t have enough executive abilities back then,” Lee Yee-seok started off (Materials Science and Engineering, 3rd grade). However, as he came back from the army, he decided to do it promptly. HYES (formerly known as Ganking, now as Hanyang E-Sports) is a now-newly-starting gathering for people who like and want to learn various games. Already having executives and over 70 members, students are more than passionate. People are already having sudden online get-togethers through ‘League of Legends’, ‘Battle Ground’, and ‘Overwatch’. The students who aren’t so good at games try even harder since they believe that it’s a great chance to improve their skills. Lee still has a lot of dreams he wants to achieve. Lee has the big picture in front of him. He is planning on a competition within the gathering and with other school students. However, solely playing games is not what his is wishing for. “I want to motivate our members to try different games and give constructive feedback to them. Moreover, I want to produce various youtube content with all of our members’ participation,” said Lee. He mentioned he wants to change the misconceptions of students playing games. “We could create a channel on youtube or facebook, so that other people could also be interested in playing games. I’m sure playing games can be very productive,” said Lee. He also mentioned that he would like more students who are willing to play games, as he enjoys teaching his knowledge to others. “I am working on changing the prejudice on gaming. Passion is the only trait required!” Having a tteokbokki mate “I went on a two-month trip to Europe during my summer vacation, and that became a crucial motivation for me to create this gathering,” said Kwon Yi-kyong (Clothing and Textiles, 3rd grade). As she hadn’t been able to eat a lot of Korean food during her stay in Europe, she had tteokbokki (spicy stir-fried rice cake) every day for two weeks after she came back to Korea. “My parents ate tteokbokki with me at first, but they gave up as that was all I was eating for two weeks,” laughed Kwon. However, as she tried to eat tteokbokki alone, she couldn’t eat all of the fried dishes and sundae (Korean stuffed sausage) on her own. Since she felt the need to have a tteokbokki mate, she created a gathering starting with 40 people with the name of ‘Han-tteok’ Han-tteok met once every other week officially, but they had sudden get-togethers very often. “After a semester starts, it’s a great chance to make new friends and eat what they want at the same time!” said Kwon. Currently with around 80 students only within four months, Kwon introduced their unique MT as well. “We went to an MT right after the semester ended. We made four groups to make the best tteokbokki in an hour,” reminisced Kwon. "I find our members whenever I go to eat tteokbokki." She is still working on the management of this gathering. “We don’t have an official activity yet, so we’re having hardships getting to know everyone. I’m planning on making one in the near future,” commented Kwon. She is also thinking of selling tteokbokki in the school festival to better advertise their gathering. “All Hanyangians, including all international students, are welcome anytime!” Beer, there’s more than you think! When people hear the word beer, they tend to only think of it as ‘fried chicken’s best friend.’ However, there is much more you have to know about beer. Lim Sung-ju (Education, 3rd grade), with great interest towards the information of beer, started a gathering named ‘Hy-beer.’ “I actually visited Europe to learn more about beer. I first started meeting up with a couple of friends to visit pubs,” reminisced Lim. However, through coming across various clubs in other schools related to alcohol drinks, Lim decided to start one himself. Starting from the second semester of last year, Hy-beer gave me the chance to learn about different types of beer with any willing Hanyangians. Lim started with a humble mind, thinking about a lot of people who wouldn’t be interested in beer. However, 40 students applied and Lim had to make a sorrowful decision of only recruiting 20 members for better management. One week, he would buy various types of beers and open a small tasting event. The next week, they would visit a fine pub and gradually find their taste between the various types of beer. Through the repetition of these two weeks, Lim found this activity worthwhile. “As we first started this gathering, a lot of the members asked me for recommendations when we visited a pub. As they experienced various beers, they seem like they are finding their own beer,” said Lim. "I like German beer the most. They stick to the basics very well." Lim is now planning on an official recruitment this March. “I am planning to recruit more people then before, so that more people can enjoy these activities,” said Lim. He mentioned that even though he might not know beer like a professional, he is still continuing his studies. “A lot of people have misconceptions on gatherings of alcohol. However, the purpose of this gathering itself is to enjoy the mood, without focusing on the amount of beer. I wish anyone who has interest in beer, even though they can’t drink well, to join our gathering.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-01 21

[Student]Melody of Sincerity

"How will you financially be successful in that path?" was the question Park got most frequently after becoming determined that he would become a harmonicist. Since he was a young boy, Park Jong-seong (Department of String and Wind Instruments majoring in Orchestra Conducting, Master’s program) had many opportunities to encounter music and learn various instruments thanks to his pianist mother. The one that enchanted Park the most was not the piano, the violin, or the flute, but the harmonica. Having studied harmonica and composition since high school, Park became a talented harmonicist player and song-writer who is dreaming of becoming a conductor in the future. The thrill of impressive touchingness Park first encountered the harmonica when he was in elementary school. He only considered the instrument as a good hobby and something he could have fun with, until his harmonica teacher suggested him to participate in a harmonica contest held in Japan. Park agreed to the suggestion and ended up receiving the grand prize, which brought his teacher to tears of happiness. “The teacher is someone who is so precious and valuable to me. He is a great person of wonderful personality who was so loving and dedicating. After receiving the grand prize and seeing him crying, I felt like I repaid for all the love I’ve received from him with music. This is when I decided that I would become a harmonicist.” Moreover, lucky for Park, the contest was also a concert for professional harmonica players, the performance which further inspired him to become a harmonicist. Park saw an old Japanese harmonicist who stepped onto the stage with a walking aid due to his weak legs, his harsh breaths clearly audible during his performance. “The sound that man produced was simply mesmerizing. It was so touching that it even made me feel jealous of his professionality. At that moment, my dream became solidified,” reminisced Park. The thrill that vibrated Park’s heart that day was the pivotal event that set his path toward becoming a harmonicist. "For my song composition, the inspiration comes from my daily life." Nonetheless, his decision was not always unchanging. While in high school, he studied music composition because he thought going to a university and majoring in composition would be the most helpful stepping stone for his dream since there is no school in Korea that has harmonica as a major,. Park realized that the history of harmonica is relatively very short and there are not many songs written for harmonica. Such bitterness urged him to become a composer for harmonica music. Park almost majored in composition in one school had it not been for another school which announced that they accept any applicants of string and wind instruments. Even though majoring in the harmonica was unheard of and unprecedented, his skill allowed Park to become the first one. Park proved his skill by collecting about 10 prizes from various contests. The most memorable one of all was the pivotal contest in Japan and some others include the Asian Pacific Harmonica Contest held in China, in which Park got the first prize in three different sections and the world’s harmonica contest in Germany. Park likes to perform his own songs in the contest because he wants to express himself through the song he composed, which he believes could best convey his color and feeling. The song he feels the strongest attachment is called ‘Run Again,’ which Park composed after his mother passed away. Park was going through a great emotional slump and could not prepare for the contest. However, he suddenly encouraged himself and brushed off the dust. This song won him a grand prize! A clip of Park's performance For myself, and for the harmonica “If I have to choose one thing to do for the rest of my life, I thought it would be the harmonica because it’s what makes me happy.” The instrument is charming to Park in its smoothness in playing. “Just with the breaths I’m taking right now, the harmonica can be played. Unlike other instruments where you have to use energy or some power, the harmonica can be played very naturally.” This is what enables Park to express and convey his emotions through his songs, as the sound comes from his natural breaths. “There is one thing I want to change about the instrument. It is the fixed idea people normally have with the harmonica. Unless they see me performing, people tend to underestimate the sound the instrument can produce. I want to change such a simple understanding about the harmonica by becoming a better player who can produce greater music.” Just as Park wanted to study music composition to compose songs for the harmonica, he wanted to study orchestra because he wants to become a better harmonica player. He was seeking further studies above composition that would guide him to enhance his skills as a player and came across the idea of studying orchestra conducting. After studying conducting at Hanyang with his professor, Park became more ambitious to carry on his studying and move on to the Doctor’s degree. He not only thinks his studying will ultimately help him to become a better player but also found another goal for himself. “I wish to be an orchestra conductor who can also participate in the performance,” envisioned Park. "I will always have fun playing the harmonica and be happy with my performance." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-01 14

[Student]Monopolizing the First Place

With the slogan ‘The Engine of Korea,’ Hanyang University (HYU) has been one of the main forces in Korea for technology and engineering domains. Having high recognition of its engineering department and other fields of technology, Hanyang has been cultivating numerous outstanding students who have the potential of becoming the future leader of the fields. In this year’s Technique Examination where five out of about 250 people are selected, four Hanyangians proudly returned with the glorious news of occupying four of the five winners’ places. News H introduces two of the four Hanyangians this week: Jeon Ui-geon (Architectural Engineering, ’12) and Cho Won-dam (Chemical Engineering, 4th year). Hard work pays off, eventually Five out of 250 sure is a fierce competition with a ruthless passing ratio. Jeon prepared for the test for almost four years and Cho for an year, the rough time of which surely paid off. When asked what is the secret of winning the competition, Jeon and Cho both gave humble yet determined answers. “I think it’s all about setting the right direction. I always tried to have the best mindset of a diligent student. No matter what I was doing or where I was, I always had my mind on the materials I was studying. By wholly fixating your mind to studying, you can draw the most out of this simple method. I even dreamed of studying in my sleep. Additionally, I relieved my stress by swimming, which helps you to clear your body and mind,” said Jeon. “For me, the reason I was able to pass the test despite the lack of time in the middle of my school semester was because I put focus on the sample questions when I was studying. By analytically studying the sample questions and figuring out the main scope of the test questions, I think I was able to efficiently prepare for the test and obtain the best result,” revealed Cho. Both Jeon and Cho were in Examination Class in Hayang, where they were funded with dormitory, studying facilities and meals. They both joined study groups to find people whom they can study with and to exchange help. They took mock tests together as a group and shared their knowledge, which turned out to be a great studying method. Both of them showed great appreciation to the group members as they were in the similar situation, which means their circumstances and emotions were highly relatable to each other. The examination is largely divided into four stages, which are carried out over five days. This year’s was Jeon’s fourth and the last test, for which he exceptionally did not have a good feeling for. “To be honest, I thought I’d pass the test every year because I had a good feeling. But this year, I had several ominous happenings such as a cockroach climbing onto my toe or breaking my glasses on the first test day, which never happened in three years. However, to overcome the bad feelings, I screamed ‘a crisis is an opportunity!’ on my scooter,” chuckled Jeon. The day before the final test, in Jeon’s dream, countless shooting stars poured onto his head, which gave him hope. In Cho’s case, once again, it depended on her perspective. “I doubted myself at first because I was so anxious. However, I regarded the test as just another test from my school, which I believe helped me to do better unconsciously. Jeon (left) and Cho (right) are two proud Hanyangians who added honor to the school. 99 percent effort, 1 percent luck Interestingly, both Jeon and Cho said that passing the examination was unexpected, not to mention receiving the top scores. They were more than glad and thankful for the result, and they confessed that they felt a little lucky. The outcome of their efforts is deeply meaningful, as their reasons for taking the test was definite. For Jeon, when he was researching for his career when he was 20 years old, he first came across the Technique Examination. Since he wanted to have a job that would greatly contribute to the interest of the public, he was convinced that he would prepare for the test in the future. On the very day he was discharged from the ROTC (Reserve Officers' Training Corps), he went straight into the Examination Class and started studying. Similarly, Cho took the test because she was inspired by his father who is a dedicated public officer who works devotedly for the country. She realized taking the test would lead her to the most desired path that accorded with her values. There were hard times, as their journey was not an easy task. Jeon felt considerable burden as he doubted himself after failing from his first try. He confessed that overcoming that fear was the hardest thing as nothing was guaranteed for sure. For Cho, who had to attend her first semester’s courses, balancing and managing her studying for both her classes and the Technique Examination was not easy. Due to their relatedness in the contents, she was able to handle both of them at the same time. Now that they have passed the first door toward their dream, their goals have been laid ahead. Jeon wants to be a green architecturer who is well-recognized by his peers. He wants to contribute to Korea’s well-being at large, which is why he decided to take the Technique Examination at the first place. On the other hand, Cho wants to contribute to Korea’s energy field. Since Korea does not produce natural resources, she wants to contribute to stabilization of the country by excluding any turbulence caused by energy shortage. "Don't feel too disappointed and never give up!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-01 08

[Student]Winners of I·SEOUL·U Storytelling Competition

Two proud Hanyang University (HYU) students won first place in the I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition. It is hosted by the Seoul Metropolitan Government with its total prize money mounting up to 20 million won. Choi Hyun-jun (Entertainment Design, 3rd year), and Nam Jung-yeon (Communication Design, 3rd year), a close friend within the College of Design, teamed up for their first competition ever and were honored with the crown. From the left, Choi Hyun-jun (Entertainment Design, 3rd year), and Nam Jung-yeon (Communication Design, 3rd year). They were both interested in design from a young age. For the first time in forever The I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition is a part of Seoul's effort to promote its brand name: I·SEOUL·U. Its participants can depict their very own unique story about Seoul through a video, article, or poster. Nam and Choi chose video as it is Choi's major in school. There were a total of 625 pieces submitted, with one first place award, three second place awards, and six third place awards. Although lots of design college students participated in such competitions, it was the first time for both Nam and Choi to participate in one. “To be honest, I was afraid before. I was not sure of my own abilities,” mentioned Choi. Beginner’s luck or not, Choi and Nam showed perfect teamwork throughout November when they prepared for the competition. “People always ask us if we ever had conflicts, but we never had one,” smiled Choi. As a pair of close friends, they both mentioned that having someone to watch over and support one another was the key to completing their video. Choi, majoring in entertainment design, did most of the editing work. “Although putting 3D into videos is not part of my curriculum, I was able to self teach myself through a video society ‘Intro’ in our school,” said Choi. Nam, on the other hand, brainstormed with Choi and edited pictures and graphics in the video. Take a look at Choi and Nam's ingenious story. (Video courtesy of Choi and Nam) The hardest part of the production was the filming. Because the team had to rent a 4K camera, they had to fit all of their filming schedule into one day. Considering that the sites were dispersed all around Seoul, they had to begin in the early morning, use time in its utmost efficiency and wrap up before sunset. The time lapse sunset in the video was taken by the team in the peak of Inwang mountain for four hours. When asked about the source of their brilliant ideas, Nam answered, ‘lots of brainstorming and our imagination.’ For instance, Nam always used to think, ‘what if there is another reason for people walking in the street?’ and they came up with an idea of magnets pulling people around in the streets. “The whole point of the video was to visualize the extraordinary reasons behind ordinary activities in our imagination,” said Nam. Creativity to gravity The inspiring ideas of the team was the crucial reason for attracting the minds of people. The winner of the I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition is first decided on the professionals’ evaluation on creativity, art, aptness to the topic, and utility. Then, the remaining 40% is up to the people’s choice. We do not know exactly how many votes the team received, but assuming from the results, Choi and Nam must have caught people’s eyes with their original ideas. "There was no secret recipe for overcoming hardships. We just bore with it. Pulling all-nighters is a usual thing for design students anyways," said Choi. When asked about the usage of their prize money of 5 million won, both plan to spend the money on purchasing devices related to their major. Nam would like to purchase a tablet so that she can enhance her productivity during the semester, and Choi plans to buy a camera, supposedly a choice based on the difficulty they had filming videos the past month. Choi and Nam would like to challenge once again in a competition, as they find each other a perfect teammate. Right now, however, they have their hands busy on their internship. “I am learning a lot, managing a project from A to Z. Making a video for my school project and for a client are two very different jobs, but I enjoy it,” mentioned Choi, with a smile on his face. Both plan to proceed in their profession according to their major. With the passion and ability they have now, they have a bright future ahead. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-01 01

[Student]Creating a New Package

Another year has passed, and people are starting the year with a new determination. In the midst of these determinations, a student is firmly walking his way towards his goal. Choi Gi-jun (Communication Design, 4th year), focused on package design during his time as a university student and is reaching towards his own star, as a succesful designer. Designing his talent The area of ‘package design’ is not a very familiar field with most people. “Package design includes everything that covers a product of any kind,” began Choi. Package design is a field within design, that includes the practical package of anything; not only the design itself, but also the shape and the materials of the package. The final output can give totally different impressions according to the materials one uses. Package design is a complex task since the design is not the only implementation the designer must consider. They have to firmly consider the practicality as sturdiness is required in consonance with the fragileness of a product, and the ambience of the material also needs to be taken care of depending on the traits of a product. Choi is explaining about the field of package design in a cafe near ERICA campus. With this skill, Choi participated in the Korea Design Exhibition with his novel idea. He designed a travel kit when Zika virus was a hot issue in Korea. “Various international viruses flow into Korea as tourists are increasing day by day. However, simple hygiene kits can actually protect against most of these viruses, and, therefore, I created an idea suited for students like myself,” explained Choi. He designed a hygiene kit which is very affordable, which targets students like him. Through this idea and design, he was able to win the special prize in the student field exhibition. He also participated in the Design Sharing Project, which was a type of talent donation. This project led to a win-win game, linking students with small businesses and city-run organizations. Students are able to learn more about the actual field of their studies, and the organizations can receive help from the students they wouldn’t have been able to receive otherwise. Through this project, Choi redesigned the sesame oil created by the Ansan Senior Club, ‘Premium (Myeong-pum) Oil’. His work resulted in a 204 percentage increase in sales. However, it wasn’t only the organization who took benefit. Choi reminisced, “The design inevitably has to change according to the target of the product. I was able to learn the details of the methods required through this program, leading towards the development of my own skills at the same time.” The design Choi created in the Korean Design Exhibition and the Design Sharing Project (Photo courtesy of Korean Design Exhibition and Ansan Senior Club) Packaging his life beautifully A designing career was not certain until he stepped into university. “I was initially interested in stage design as a high school student. That was the only area I actually experienced, and that was the very reason I wished to major in it,” explained Choi. He first encountered the field of package design through the recommendation of his teacher. He was captivated by the fact that he was able to make a three-dimensional design instead of a two-dimensional design as he had continuously done. However, after his entrance, he had his ups and downs. “I hit a slump as the years passed in university. As we continuously experience and observe various works, the level of our expectations gets higher. However, there is a certain point that my hands cannot satisfy my eyes.” He worked even harder during his slump. He believed the only method to get out of a slump is to practice as much as he can. He showed his works to others to receive feedback and repeated modifications until he was able to materialize his works through his intention. Choi will continue his design career with his enthusiasm. Now his goal is to become a respected designer in the area. He is already in the midst of preparing his portfolio and has his firm interests in mind. “I want to make packages related to food. There are certain organizations I’m interested in. When you see their designs, you can tell if they showed concern in design or not.” He also added that he wishes the treatment for designers could improve as well. “The social recognition for designers is still low in Korea due to the lack of workplaces for designers. I wish this problem could be solved in the near future,” wished Choi. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myeong

2017-12 27

[Student]Ballerina with Love in Deed

“Ballet is creating a sculpture that is visible only for a moment,” says Erol Ozan, writer of Talus. There is a ballerina and a choreographer who is creating such beauty of moments everyday- Lee Ji-hee (Dance, Doctoral program). As a winner of a triple crown of Chungbuk Dance Awards, Lee revealed her stories and passion towards ballet and choreography. Lee majored in dance for her bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degree at Hanyang University. On the way to become a senior granting love Lee won three trophies in the Chungbuk Dance Awards: Solo dance, choreography, and group dance awards. “It was truly a great opportunity for me to contribute to the growth in artistic recognition of Chungbuk where a very minimum of support for ballet takes place,” explained Lee. Despite the glory that shines behind her, the journey to stand on the top in her field was not as easy and beautiful as others might consider. “Both of my parents loved reading books and watching ballet, as my mother even majored in it. With my genetic ability for flexibility and my interests in creating stories through ballet, I never left this field since my elementary school years,” explained Lee. Majoring in dance at Hanyang University starting 2001, Lee is now looking forward to receive her doctorate in ballet. “Professor Kim Bok-hee and Son Kwan-jun from Hanyang University helped me out to become a better ballerina and treated me like their daughter. Working as a main dancer for their ballet companies, I grew my passion in choreography too,” said Lee. In her third year in college, Lee had to face bitter words regarding her ability. Professors and other dance instructors often told her that Lee’s techniques may be decent, but are lacking her own color. “To find my persona in dance, I decided to overcome my meticulousness. I began travelling around the world and even encountered dangerous situations in Rumania, dealing with gypsies,” laughed out Lee. By accumulating a broad spectrum of experiences, Lee was able to discover various emotions and sources for her dance. “My capability to choreograph and express emotions in my dance was all augmented thanks to my professors. I want to become a senior who can help my junior ballerinas just like my teachers did,” said Lee. Lee is a ballerina and a choreographer who has recently won a triple crown at Chungbuk Dance Awards. Artists: turning stress into beauty Living as a ballerina and a choreographer at the same time is arduous, and sometimes painful, says Lee. Because art is not an everyday subject that people are interested in, the financial status of numerous artists is in an inopportune condition. “Facing the reality as an artist is sometimes extremely stressful considering the unstable financial circumstances and artist’s block occurring in the process of artistic creation, like choreography,” explained Lee. Despite the stress the Lee copes with, she also talks about the pleasure of termination and passion. “Even though it is difficult to create an art work, the pleasure it brings with termination is beyond the description in words. I think these feelings are the sources and reasons for my passion and work,” smiled Lee. Lee always knew that without passion and perseverance, one can never become an artist, and thus, she spent 17 years of hard work at Hanyang University to accomplish her goals. Lee's journey is still far to go, and she hopes that her juniors will also run for their goals like she did in her past. Starting next year, Lee is planning to perform in America and Hong Kong. However, Lee’s dream has yet to be achieved. “I never chased a goal in presence but only the dream in the future. Viewing life in a wider spectrum is important, and passion is the key. I know it is hard, but I hope my juniors will never stop running!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-Myeong

2017-12 26

[Student]Let the Class of 85 Be a Step Forward to Your Dreams

‘Tell me what you want to do, and the 85s will help!’ is the slogan of the second 85 Dream Scholarship, which is funded by the graduates of Hanyang University who were admitted in 1985. Their donation first started last year with the late night meal during exams for the class of 15, who are 30 years junior to the class of 85. Then, with much success with the last year’s Dream Scholarship, the class of 85 alumni came back this year with much more financial assistance. News H met three of the eight lucky teams to hear more about their stories. "I am constantly learning to improve the contents in Si-garette, and also regarding the copyright issue. The fact that I have enjoyed every step enabled me to come this far. Take a piece of literature instead of a cigarette Song Yu-su (Advertising & public relations, 4th year) and his team ‘Si-garette’ are looking forward to making their ideas come true in the real-world thanks to the support of the Dream Scholarship. The team name ‘Si-garette’ is also the name of their product, a combination of Si (which means poetry in Korean) and cigarette. Twenty short pieces of literature, poetry, or fun facts are rolled into a box that opens like a cigarette box. “I found that people smoke because the world never says ‘si(yes)’. I wish Si-garette can help people bear the world better,” said Song. The Si-garette contains 20 short stories and contents in a rolled paper like cigarette. Contents can be previewed in Si-garette's instagram account: @sigarette_pocketpoem Si-garette team plans to utilize the grant on an automated machine. When Song first thought of the idea three years ago, he neglected that rolling the papers and putting it into a box could cause a hassle in mass production. Before this June, Song focused on recruiting writers to provide their works to be published through Si-garette. “But in reality, the machine cost too much as we have to make a special one to serve our purpose. Other business competitions would not fund the project because I did not aim to profit from this,” reflected Song. But thanks to the Dream Scholarship, the long aspiration of Song is at the brink of realization. The first copies will be handed out for free to increase the recognition among people, and with the reputation, Song hopes for a paid sponsorship from private companies. Then, the profit will be used to publish the books of underground writers. “I love writing, but I know that I am not good enough to be a full-time writer. That is why I chose to help other writers through such projects,” said Song, with a humble smile. "My story brought a sense of empathy, and I think that was the key to my winning the scholarship." Blowing the dust off from the paper The next beneficiary we met is a soon-to-be comic artist, Lee Jin-hyun (Advertising & Public Relations, 2nd year). Lee has been drawing cartoons from a young age, but the pressure of college admission made her put the papers aside. She recently had a chance to take the dust off from the rusty dream, ironically when she got sick and had to withdraw from school temporarily. “I had time to think about my old dream and decided to pursue it,” Lee said. Lee desires to draw and write a story about an Indian child selling tea on street. It is a combination of Lee’s interest in tea and India. When asked: ‘what do you think was the key to your winning?’, Lee answered, “a feeling of sympathy.” “I suppose the seniors agreed to my story and wanted me to learn more with the scholarship they granted.” Lee plans to register for art academy as she has never formally learned drawing. Lee added that the seniors wish her to persist on one story and upload them to amateur platforms such as ‘Naver challenge for the best’. “I would like to say thank you for the class of 85 seniors, and I dream to help my juniors in thirty years,” said Lee. Mentor for the mentors Being a mentor to someone requires excellent interpersonal skills, especially if the mentee is a sensitive child during puberty. Team ‘Mentos’ is going to publish a guidebook for all the college mentors out there, guiding children. “There practically is no education nor training for the mentors, although there are so many programs and institutions initiating mentor programs,” lamented Sim Young-woo (Philosophy, 3rd year). That is why the three friends gathered up to become a mentor for the mentors. From the left, Ryoo Chang-hee (Philosophy, 3rd year), Sim Young-woo (Philosophy, 3rd year) and Lim Se-hoon (Philosophy, 3rd year). All three team members: Sim Young-woo (Philosophy, 3rd year), Lim Se-hoon (Philosophy, 3rd year) and Ryoo Chang-hee (Philosophy, 3rd year) have at least two years of experience as a mentor. Based on their unique experiences, Sim is in charge of the ‘academics’ part, Ryu in ‘life’, and Lim in the ‘experience’ part of the book. As diverse as their experiences, the motivation to become a mentor is all vastly different. Ryu, for instance, dreamt of becoming an instructor at private academies. However, he constantly felt like the students stop their interaction and relationship with the tutor when their time of struggle for college admission comes to an end. As he aspired to set up his own institute where students and teachers can remain in a good, long-lasting relationship, he applied for several mentoring programs to learn the secret. “Initially I thought I would quit after a promised year like most of the work I do, but witnessing my small help becoming a big one for the kids was so rewarding for me to keep doing the mentoring job up until now,” smiled Ryu. "All three of us once dreamt of becoming educators, but not now. The reason we are doing this project is to leave our footsteps behind so that our fellow university students can have something to refer to when they feel lost, which we ourselves wished for." Their book, consisted of aforementioned three parts, aims to provide a well-rounded guide for beginning mentors from ‘how to start a conversation’ to ‘how to say farewell without hurting the mentee’. They started writing the book this April, with the help of the Hanyang Academic Town that supports students’ noble ideas for research. But the aid was not enough for them to print as many copies they had intended to. “So we actually planned to use our own money,” said Sim. “That is why we are going to use all of the scholarship into printing,” added Lim. The ‘Mentors’ team finished their first draft before the final exam. “Now it is the real beginning. We have to design the book, edit the contents, and actually publish it. It is going to be one very busy vacation,” said Ryu with much delight in his voice. The three philosophers’ faces were filled with joy and passion throughout the interview. We look forward to reading their book in the Center for Social Innovation. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Jin-myung, Kang Cho-hyun