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2018-01 08

[Student]Winners of I·SEOUL·U Storytelling Competition

Two proud Hanyang University (HYU) students won first place in the I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition. It is hosted by the Seoul Metropolitan Government with its total prize money mounting up to 20 million won. Choi Hyun-jun (Entertainment Design, 3rd year), and Nam Jung-yeon (Communication Design, 3rd year), a close friend within the College of Design, teamed up for their first competition ever and were honored with the crown. From the left, Choi Hyun-jun (Entertainment Design, 3rd year), and Nam Jung-yeon (Communication Design, 3rd year). They were both interested in design from a young age. For the first time in forever The I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition is a part of Seoul's effort to promote its brand name: I·SEOUL·U. Its participants can depict their very own unique story about Seoul through a video, article, or poster. Nam and Choi chose video as it is Choi's major in school. There were a total of 625 pieces submitted, with one first place award, three second place awards, and six third place awards. Although lots of design college students participated in such competitions, it was the first time for both Nam and Choi to participate in one. “To be honest, I was afraid before. I was not sure of my own abilities,” mentioned Choi. Beginner’s luck or not, Choi and Nam showed perfect teamwork throughout November when they prepared for the competition. “People always ask us if we ever had conflicts, but we never had one,” smiled Choi. As a pair of close friends, they both mentioned that having someone to watch over and support one another was the key to completing their video. Choi, majoring in entertainment design, did most of the editing work. “Although putting 3D into videos is not part of my curriculum, I was able to self teach myself through a video society ‘Intro’ in our school,” said Choi. Nam, on the other hand, brainstormed with Choi and edited pictures and graphics in the video. Take a look at Choi and Nam's ingenious story. (Video courtesy of Choi and Nam) The hardest part of the production was the filming. Because the team had to rent a 4K camera, they had to fit all of their filming schedule into one day. Considering that the sites were dispersed all around Seoul, they had to begin in the early morning, use time in its utmost efficiency and wrap up before sunset. The time lapse sunset in the video was taken by the team in the peak of Inwang mountain for four hours. When asked about the source of their brilliant ideas, Nam answered, ‘lots of brainstorming and our imagination.’ For instance, Nam always used to think, ‘what if there is another reason for people walking in the street?’ and they came up with an idea of magnets pulling people around in the streets. “The whole point of the video was to visualize the extraordinary reasons behind ordinary activities in our imagination,” said Nam. Creativity to gravity The inspiring ideas of the team was the crucial reason for attracting the minds of people. The winner of the I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition is first decided on the professionals’ evaluation on creativity, art, aptness to the topic, and utility. Then, the remaining 40% is up to the people’s choice. We do not know exactly how many votes the team received, but assuming from the results, Choi and Nam must have caught people’s eyes with their original ideas. "There was no secret recipe for overcoming hardships. We just bore with it. Pulling all-nighters is a usual thing for design students anyways," said Choi. When asked about the usage of their prize money of 5 million won, both plan to spend the money on purchasing devices related to their major. Nam would like to purchase a tablet so that she can enhance her productivity during the semester, and Choi plans to buy a camera, supposedly a choice based on the difficulty they had filming videos the past month. Choi and Nam would like to challenge once again in a competition, as they find each other a perfect teammate. Right now, however, they have their hands busy on their internship. “I am learning a lot, managing a project from A to Z. Making a video for my school project and for a client are two very different jobs, but I enjoy it,” mentioned Choi, with a smile on his face. Both plan to proceed in their profession according to their major. With the passion and ability they have now, they have a bright future ahead. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-01 01

[Student]Creating a New Package

Another year has passed, and people are starting the year with a new determination. In the midst of these determinations, a student is firmly walking his way towards his goal. Choi Gi-jun (Communication Design, 4th year), focused on package design during his time as a university student and is reaching towards his own star, as a succesful designer. Designing his talent The area of ‘package design’ is not a very familiar field with most people. “Package design includes everything that covers a product of any kind,” began Choi. Package design is a field within design, that includes the practical package of anything; not only the design itself, but also the shape and the materials of the package. The final output can give totally different impressions according to the materials one uses. Package design is a complex task since the design is not the only implementation the designer must consider. They have to firmly consider the practicality as sturdiness is required in consonance with the fragileness of a product, and the ambience of the material also needs to be taken care of depending on the traits of a product. Choi is explaining about the field of package design in a cafe near ERICA campus. With this skill, Choi participated in the Korea Design Exhibition with his novel idea. He designed a travel kit when Zika virus was a hot issue in Korea. “Various international viruses flow into Korea as tourists are increasing day by day. However, simple hygiene kits can actually protect against most of these viruses, and, therefore, I created an idea suited for students like myself,” explained Choi. He designed a hygiene kit which is very affordable, which targets students like him. Through this idea and design, he was able to win the special prize in the student field exhibition. He also participated in the Design Sharing Project, which was a type of talent donation. This project led to a win-win game, linking students with small businesses and city-run organizations. Students are able to learn more about the actual field of their studies, and the organizations can receive help from the students they wouldn’t have been able to receive otherwise. Through this project, Choi redesigned the sesame oil created by the Ansan Senior Club, ‘Premium (Myeong-pum) Oil’. His work resulted in a 204 percentage increase in sales. However, it wasn’t only the organization who took benefit. Choi reminisced, “The design inevitably has to change according to the target of the product. I was able to learn the details of the methods required through this program, leading towards the development of my own skills at the same time.” The design Choi created in the Korean Design Exhibition and the Design Sharing Project (Photo courtesy of Korean Design Exhibition and Ansan Senior Club) Packaging his life beautifully A designing career was not certain until he stepped into university. “I was initially interested in stage design as a high school student. That was the only area I actually experienced, and that was the very reason I wished to major in it,” explained Choi. He first encountered the field of package design through the recommendation of his teacher. He was captivated by the fact that he was able to make a three-dimensional design instead of a two-dimensional design as he had continuously done. However, after his entrance, he had his ups and downs. “I hit a slump as the years passed in university. As we continuously experience and observe various works, the level of our expectations gets higher. However, there is a certain point that my hands cannot satisfy my eyes.” He worked even harder during his slump. He believed the only method to get out of a slump is to practice as much as he can. He showed his works to others to receive feedback and repeated modifications until he was able to materialize his works through his intention. Choi will continue his design career with his enthusiasm. Now his goal is to become a respected designer in the area. He is already in the midst of preparing his portfolio and has his firm interests in mind. “I want to make packages related to food. There are certain organizations I’m interested in. When you see their designs, you can tell if they showed concern in design or not.” He also added that he wishes the treatment for designers could improve as well. “The social recognition for designers is still low in Korea due to the lack of workplaces for designers. I wish this problem could be solved in the near future,” wished Choi. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myeong

2017-12 27

[Student]Ballerina with Love in Deed

“Ballet is creating a sculpture that is visible only for a moment,” says Erol Ozan, writer of Talus. There is a ballerina and a choreographer who is creating such beauty of moments everyday- Lee Ji-hee (Dance, Doctoral program). As a winner of a triple crown of Chungbuk Dance Awards, Lee revealed her stories and passion towards ballet and choreography. Lee majored in dance for her bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degree at Hanyang University. On the way to become a senior granting love Lee won three trophies in the Chungbuk Dance Awards: Solo dance, choreography, and group dance awards. “It was truly a great opportunity for me to contribute to the growth in artistic recognition of Chungbuk where a very minimum of support for ballet takes place,” explained Lee. Despite the glory that shines behind her, the journey to stand on the top in her field was not as easy and beautiful as others might consider. “Both of my parents loved reading books and watching ballet, as my mother even majored in it. With my genetic ability for flexibility and my interests in creating stories through ballet, I never left this field since my elementary school years,” explained Lee. Majoring in dance at Hanyang University starting 2001, Lee is now looking forward to receive her doctorate in ballet. “Professor Kim Bok-hee and Son Kwan-jun from Hanyang University helped me out to become a better ballerina and treated me like their daughter. Working as a main dancer for their ballet companies, I grew my passion in choreography too,” said Lee. In her third year in college, Lee had to face bitter words regarding her ability. Professors and other dance instructors often told her that Lee’s techniques may be decent, but are lacking her own color. “To find my persona in dance, I decided to overcome my meticulousness. I began travelling around the world and even encountered dangerous situations in Rumania, dealing with gypsies,” laughed out Lee. By accumulating a broad spectrum of experiences, Lee was able to discover various emotions and sources for her dance. “My capability to choreograph and express emotions in my dance was all augmented thanks to my professors. I want to become a senior who can help my junior ballerinas just like my teachers did,” said Lee. Lee is a ballerina and a choreographer who has recently won a triple crown at Chungbuk Dance Awards. Artists: turning stress into beauty Living as a ballerina and a choreographer at the same time is arduous, and sometimes painful, says Lee. Because art is not an everyday subject that people are interested in, the financial status of numerous artists is in an inopportune condition. “Facing the reality as an artist is sometimes extremely stressful considering the unstable financial circumstances and artist’s block occurring in the process of artistic creation, like choreography,” explained Lee. Despite the stress the Lee copes with, she also talks about the pleasure of termination and passion. “Even though it is difficult to create an art work, the pleasure it brings with termination is beyond the description in words. I think these feelings are the sources and reasons for my passion and work,” smiled Lee. Lee always knew that without passion and perseverance, one can never become an artist, and thus, she spent 17 years of hard work at Hanyang University to accomplish her goals. Lee's journey is still far to go, and she hopes that her juniors will also run for their goals like she did in her past. Starting next year, Lee is planning to perform in America and Hong Kong. However, Lee’s dream has yet to be achieved. “I never chased a goal in presence but only the dream in the future. Viewing life in a wider spectrum is important, and passion is the key. I know it is hard, but I hope my juniors will never stop running!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-Myeong

2017-12 26

[Student]Let the Class of 85 Be a Step Forward to Your Dreams

‘Tell me what you want to do, and the 85s will help!’ is the slogan of the second 85 Dream Scholarship, which is funded by the graduates of Hanyang University who were admitted in 1985. Their donation first started last year with the late night meal during exams for the class of 15, who are 30 years junior to the class of 85. Then, with much success with the last year’s Dream Scholarship, the class of 85 alumni came back this year with much more financial assistance. News H met three of the eight lucky teams to hear more about their stories. "I am constantly learning to improve the contents in Si-garette, and also regarding the copyright issue. The fact that I have enjoyed every step enabled me to come this far. Take a piece of literature instead of a cigarette Song Yu-su (Advertising & public relations, 4th year) and his team ‘Si-garette’ are looking forward to making their ideas come true in the real-world thanks to the support of the Dream Scholarship. The team name ‘Si-garette’ is also the name of their product, a combination of Si (which means poetry in Korean) and cigarette. Twenty short pieces of literature, poetry, or fun facts are rolled into a box that opens like a cigarette box. “I found that people smoke because the world never says ‘si(yes)’. I wish Si-garette can help people bear the world better,” said Song. The Si-garette contains 20 short stories and contents in a rolled paper like cigarette. Contents can be previewed in Si-garette's instagram account: @sigarette_pocketpoem Si-garette team plans to utilize the grant on an automated machine. When Song first thought of the idea three years ago, he neglected that rolling the papers and putting it into a box could cause a hassle in mass production. Before this June, Song focused on recruiting writers to provide their works to be published through Si-garette. “But in reality, the machine cost too much as we have to make a special one to serve our purpose. Other business competitions would not fund the project because I did not aim to profit from this,” reflected Song. But thanks to the Dream Scholarship, the long aspiration of Song is at the brink of realization. The first copies will be handed out for free to increase the recognition among people, and with the reputation, Song hopes for a paid sponsorship from private companies. Then, the profit will be used to publish the books of underground writers. “I love writing, but I know that I am not good enough to be a full-time writer. That is why I chose to help other writers through such projects,” said Song, with a humble smile. "My story brought a sense of empathy, and I think that was the key to my winning the scholarship." Blowing the dust off from the paper The next beneficiary we met is a soon-to-be comic artist, Lee Jin-hyun (Advertising & Public Relations, 2nd year). Lee has been drawing cartoons from a young age, but the pressure of college admission made her put the papers aside. She recently had a chance to take the dust off from the rusty dream, ironically when she got sick and had to withdraw from school temporarily. “I had time to think about my old dream and decided to pursue it,” Lee said. Lee desires to draw and write a story about an Indian child selling tea on street. It is a combination of Lee’s interest in tea and India. When asked: ‘what do you think was the key to your winning?’, Lee answered, “a feeling of sympathy.” “I suppose the seniors agreed to my story and wanted me to learn more with the scholarship they granted.” Lee plans to register for art academy as she has never formally learned drawing. Lee added that the seniors wish her to persist on one story and upload them to amateur platforms such as ‘Naver challenge for the best’. “I would like to say thank you for the class of 85 seniors, and I dream to help my juniors in thirty years,” said Lee. Mentor for the mentors Being a mentor to someone requires excellent interpersonal skills, especially if the mentee is a sensitive child during puberty. Team ‘Mentos’ is going to publish a guidebook for all the college mentors out there, guiding children. “There practically is no education nor training for the mentors, although there are so many programs and institutions initiating mentor programs,” lamented Sim Young-woo (Philosophy, 3rd year). That is why the three friends gathered up to become a mentor for the mentors. From the left, Ryoo Chang-hee (Philosophy, 3rd year), Sim Young-woo (Philosophy, 3rd year) and Lim Se-hoon (Philosophy, 3rd year). All three team members: Sim Young-woo (Philosophy, 3rd year), Lim Se-hoon (Philosophy, 3rd year) and Ryoo Chang-hee (Philosophy, 3rd year) have at least two years of experience as a mentor. Based on their unique experiences, Sim is in charge of the ‘academics’ part, Ryu in ‘life’, and Lim in the ‘experience’ part of the book. As diverse as their experiences, the motivation to become a mentor is all vastly different. Ryu, for instance, dreamt of becoming an instructor at private academies. However, he constantly felt like the students stop their interaction and relationship with the tutor when their time of struggle for college admission comes to an end. As he aspired to set up his own institute where students and teachers can remain in a good, long-lasting relationship, he applied for several mentoring programs to learn the secret. “Initially I thought I would quit after a promised year like most of the work I do, but witnessing my small help becoming a big one for the kids was so rewarding for me to keep doing the mentoring job up until now,” smiled Ryu. "All three of us once dreamt of becoming educators, but not now. The reason we are doing this project is to leave our footsteps behind so that our fellow university students can have something to refer to when they feel lost, which we ourselves wished for." Their book, consisted of aforementioned three parts, aims to provide a well-rounded guide for beginning mentors from ‘how to start a conversation’ to ‘how to say farewell without hurting the mentee’. They started writing the book this April, with the help of the Hanyang Academic Town that supports students’ noble ideas for research. But the aid was not enough for them to print as many copies they had intended to. “So we actually planned to use our own money,” said Sim. “That is why we are going to use all of the scholarship into printing,” added Lim. The ‘Mentors’ team finished their first draft before the final exam. “Now it is the real beginning. We have to design the book, edit the contents, and actually publish it. It is going to be one very busy vacation,” said Ryu with much delight in his voice. The three philosophers’ faces were filled with joy and passion throughout the interview. We look forward to reading their book in the Center for Social Innovation. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Jin-myung, Kang Cho-hyun

2017-12 18

[Student]Strong Inside and Out

A possessor of a doctor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering, a violinist, and an air force pilot officer are three titles that seem distantly irrelevant, as they do not overlap in their boundaries, and, perhaps, due to the awareness that each title takes a strenuously long time to achieve. Surprisingly, as it turns out, they could all belong to a single person who has passion and definite goals for the future. Youn Sung-hee (Mechanical Engineering Integrated Masters/Doctoral program, ’17) is a recently commissioned pilot officer from the Republic of Korea Air Force who obtained her Integrated Masters/Doctoral degree from Hanyang University. Youn shared her compelling story with News H this week. These pictures allow a brief glimpse into Youn's achievement. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Pivotal encounter Up until when she was a first grader in high school, Youn specialized in violin. She has numerous experience performing with a music band and also in solo performance, originally having planned to enter the school of music. When asked what has suddenly inspired her to get interested in mechanical engineering in the middle of majoring in violin, Youn answered in a convincing voice: “I was in the class room one day and heard a loud noise from a helicopter that was distractingly loud. I was triggered to think of ways to reduce the noise pollution coming from the helicopters, then I decided that I would study mechanical engineering to get expert knowledge to better address the problem.” This turning point in her youth resulted in who she is today. She started to catch up with science and math in high school in preparation to study mechanics later. She received her bachelor’s degree in three years, majoring in Physics. Afterwards, she entered the Hanyang Graduate School of Mechanical Engineering and obtained her masters/doctoral degree, further nourishing her dream of becoming a researcher of weapon systems. “As a female, I never even thought of becoming a military officer. I was hoping to become a researcher in the Agency for Defense Development or the Hanwha Corporation of Explosives, as I dreamed of contributing to the advancement of Korea’s National Army and its weapons.” It seems that the most powerful fuel that motivated her to devote her time and effort in studying the field of mechanical engineering and to become a military officer is her patriotism. While Youn was studying in Hanyang, she was involved in a project with the Agency for Defense Development. Meanwhile, she encountered another turning point. She came to realize that it is a soldier, not a civilian researcher who holds the key to diagnosing what the military truly needs. This led Youn to conclude that she must touch and observe the weapons herself in order to find out what and how to improve the current system. Finally, and most importantly, Youn visited The Korea Institute of Military Science and Technology, where she met an air force lieutenant-colonel active in duty by chance. He offered to enlist her in the army and conduct her research after hearing Youn’s plans full of passion and patriotism. After a ponderous deliberation, Youn was convinced that she would do so. “I am very satisfied with how things are going in my life, and I am ready for what awaits me.” Youn has gone through 12 weeks of military training. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Youn playing the violin: Youn is still an active violinist as she is the Head of the Orchestra at Chung-ang University and the Amateur Orchestra Union and occasionally performs solo. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Spreading the wings of a dream Of the 310 officers that were commissioned alongside Youn, 16 were female, and Youn was one of them. She confessed that the 12 weeks of training were dreadful, as the training requires not only strong physical stamina but also mental volition. “It is true that the training was hard to endure as a female,” chuckled Youn, “however, I endured the hardship with a strong mindset. Plus, my stamina wasn’t that bad to begin with.” Believing in the famous phrase that a ‘citizen’s strength is national strength,’ she always exercised in her spare time when she was in graduate school. Although no strength is ever enough to endure the harsh training in the army, Youn’s relentless passion and dedication seem to have paved the way for her. “Of course, there are a lot of fun episodes to talk about. Secretly munching on the snacks hidden by the soldiers of the previous regime and getting caught looking at a playful companion painting the camouflage cream silly and more is one such. There are many little stories that make me smile.” When Youn was studying in graduate school, she published a number of excellent papers. Two of them have been registered in the Science Citation Index, and one of which owns a patent for an optical system, which is related to protecting an aircraft from an enemy’s laser attack. Her research primarily dealt with the analysis of damage from a large output of laser. In other words, by analyzing how the damage is done to an air craft from a laser attack, the technology to prevent serious damage and protect the air craft can be invented. Youn is planning to continue her study because she values not only hands-on experience but also the academic background. “I am going to go on with my research studies to not lose touch with them!” In this upcoming January, after the rest from basic education and training, Youn is entering the Air Force Logistics Command Aviation Technology Research Institute and getting down to her research. “Energizing Korea’s dignity is my life goal. I believe if Korea becomes stronger through solid infrastructure in terms of national defence, the country’s respectability could rise after which diplomacy and the tension from foreign relations could ease and our people could feel relieved. I am determined that it is my duty and responsibility to protect the people and the country. I am willing to devote my life into what I will be given with,” remarked Youn, heartfully. As an aviation technology researcher, an air force officer, and a violinist, Youn will always follow her heart. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-12 04

[Student]Touchdown with Your Passion

The Hanyang Lions have recently grabbed the golden championship cup in their hands for the 2017 KAFA (Korea American Football Association) Challenge Ball. The KAFA Challenge Ball is a national American football competition held twice a year during spring and fall for all university teams. With the players’ passion towards American football, the Lions were able to win the cup and also the long, solid reputation of the club. News H met the captain of the Hanyang Lions, Yum Joon-suk (Applied Art, 2nd year) to hear more about the journey and spirit of Lions. Yum is a captain of the Hanyang Lions, the oldest American football club of Hanyang University. “Experience American football, and you will be seduced by its charm!” The KAFA Challenge Ball is divided into the regional and national competitions. Since the Hanyang Lions belong to the Seoul region, the Lions first had to make it into top four teams through the Seoul Regional Fall Challenge Ball. “During the quarterfinals of the Seoul Regional Fall Challenge Ball, we were losing by a score of 21:0 in the first half. However, we did not give up and turned the game around and miraculously won by 22:21 and were able to advance to the national competition,” said Yum with excitement. Since it was a victory for the Hanyang Lions after 2012, all team members and their seniors could not hide their smiles. At the final match, the Hanyang Lions were able to taste victory with overflowing tension. “The most exciting part of American football is that prediction never works. Even though we were winning in the beginning, we were caught up by the opposite team in the middle. So, we tried our best and never lost a grasp of tension until the final whistle was blown,” said Yum. American football is divided into two parts- offense and defense. There are four roles that offense players can play which are quarterback, running back, receiver, and offensive line. Also for defense players, the three roles are linebacker, defensive back, and defensive line, all of which are options they may choose. “The charm of American football is that despite your height, weight, and characteristics, you can take at least one position that perfectly suits you,” explained Yum. It was the first victory for the Hanyang Lions in the national league in five years. Hanyang Lions and glory The Hanyang Lions is an official American football club of Hanyang University first organized in 1962. With its long, solid history, all graduates and seniors make great efforts to support the club. “Our coach is also a senior who comes to teach and help us, even though he has his own job. Our seniors love the club and their financial supports along with cheerful words really encouraged us until the victory,” said Yum proudly. Yum is a team captain who organizes various events to build more powerful teamwork and to promote the Hanyang Lions to other students. “Organizing events, helping out freshmen members to adjust, and promoting our club is my main mission. The field captain of our club sets plans for actual games and manages practice sessions at least twice a week,” explained Yum. The Hanyang Lions is composed of students from various departments. "We always have a camp training during the summer and meet at least twice a week to practice or hang out together, except for the exam period. Teamwork is the key to success in our club,” highlighted Yum. "I hope more students will be enticed by the charm of American football!" Yum’s responsibility as a captain of the Hanyang Lions will end in December, and new leaders and people will gleam the club next year. "I hope more freshmen will join our club and learn the beauty of American football and teamwork along with it!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-11 13

[Student]Giving Motivation to Live

On the 18th to the 20th of October, a symposium was held by The Korean Society for Preventive Medicine. Four teams who passed the preliminary rounds were given a session to present their research in the Grand Hotel in Haeundae, Busan. Five students, Cho Seung-won (Medicine, 2nd year), Moon Seong-geun (Medicine, 2nd year), Lee Woo-yeon (Medicine, 1st year), Jin Yoo-hyeon (Medicine, 1st year) and Shin Ji-sook (Medicine, 1st year), proudly won the third prize in this symposium, with research named ‘Factors Affecting Suicidal Ideation of Univeristy Students: Based on a comparison to Their Non-University-Attending Peers‘. News H met three of these students- Cho, Lee and Jin- in a quiet café, early in the morning, to hear more about their unique experience. Contrary to the graveness of their paper, they brightened up the whole cafe during the interview. Enthusiasm combined in a single paper Almost all of the university students who major in medical science go through a subject named "preventive medicine". In order to study this subject, they use textbooks made by The Korean Society for Preventive Medicine. This society, therefore, holds a symposium every year with a purpose to return their profits to the students. This year, the 70th symposium was held with a theme of ‘From cure to prevention of illness, a paradigm shift of national health promotion fund strategy’. Various university students form teams and submit papers related to the topic, and only four teams receive a chance to present their research on the spot. The team consisting of five Hanyangians received this chance and explained their paper on the suicides of the 20’s, which was an area where a lot of research has been lacking. “We first met each other in a suicide prevention club made for students in Seoul majoring in medical science,” reminisced Cho. They visited mental health centers to help those in need and persistently studied these areas. This gave them the motivation to participate in this symposium together. They were so enthusiastic in their research that they devoted the majority of their vacation into their research. Although Hanyangians majoring in medicine only have three to five weeks of vacation, this team met constantly for two weeks to proceed their research. They studied the factors of the 20’s suicides by analyzing statistics by themselves. As a result of their diligent effort, they could present unique research and also receive a great outcome. Cho gave a great presentation that led to a successful result. (Photo courtesy of Lee) The 20’s suicides: out of the government’s picture Their paper did not have an easy theme to proceed with. There had been a lot of research on the reasons of suicides in various ages groups such as teenagers and the elderly. However, this team found out that there was not enough information on the people who just stepped into the society. The ‘adult’ category defined by the government contained ages from the 20’s to the 40’s, and these Hanyangians felt that this category couldn’t fully explain the reasons for 20’s suicides. Throughout their research, they concentrated on the difference between the people who entered university and the people who didn’t. Even within the same age group, the students were concerned the two parties would have different thoughts as they go through vastly different experiences, such as jobs or personal relationships. They, therefore, analyzed the social survey of the National Statistical Office. “We made an exemption on all of those who had any experience in a university. We, therefore, had four different groups: by their gender and their experience in university,” commented Lee. They came to a conclusion that there was a visible difference between these groups on the ratio of people who had ever thought about suicide. “Females who didn’t go to university ranked the highest percentage for suicidal thinking at 11 percent, while men who went to university ranked the lowest at 3.5 percent,” explained Lee. As proud Hanyangians After their symposium, they are now making a brief plan for their follow-up study. Jin explained, “We are curious if this difference we found had the same traits in the past. This party itself has not been focused on in previous studies, so we are just making an abstract frame.” They, indeed, are busy students studying medicine, but they still find a way out to pursue what they want. “Me and Yoo-hyeon also participate in a book club, and all of us try to attend all seminars associated with preventive medicine. It might look tough, but it’s simply something we do to relieve our academic stress,” chuckled Lee. "We wish the prejudice on mental health clinics could change over time." They seemed confident and enthusiastic in their field of research throughout the whole interview. However, they also had their deep, personal concerns. “As I started this research, I felt uncertain if I could practically represent those facing hardships. Generally, most students in our major live a fortunate life with less economic concerns. We, sometimes, feel the burden that we might not be able to estimate their situations as much. I just want to let other people know that there are still people like us who truly care about them,” commented Cho. These students will continue working for their own goals, and they will succeed in motivating others to live. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-10 23

[Student]Hanyang's Volleyball Player Stepping Up into the Pro Game

The 2017-18 season V League successfully started its first game on October 14th. The Skywalkers, the team of Hyundai Capital, also started off with a victory. In this sky-rocketing team, rookies were selected through a draft on the 25th of September, enjoying their first victory as a professional. Hong Min-gi (Division of Sports and Well-being, 5th year, the ERICA Campus), was selected by the Skywalkers as a center this day and is now living his life as a professional volleyball player. From Hanyang to Skywalkers Most players start their life as a professional through the draft. Seven pro volleyball teams in Korea pick their new team members in order, by placing a player’s name from the board to their own team’s board. Once the players are of age, they can freely participate in the draft according to their own will. “All players are extremely nervous during this process. Most of them look pale since this decides their life as a professional,” reminisced Hong. In this state of tension, Hong was proudly selected in the first round, by the Skywalkers, for his noticeable skills in blocking. He also added, “It still feels like I’m dreaming. My head is full of volleyball 24 hours these days.” Hong explaining his draft day experience Hong, now, stays together in the ‘Castle of Skywalkers’, a base camp in Cheon-an with his team members for training. As a rookie, he had to fit into a whole new environment with new people. “The team generally has a free atmosphere. I did feel afraid of the training before I entered the Skywalkers. However, after personally experiencing it, I realized I am training in a more effective way,” said Hong. It has not been long since the season started, so he explained that he is currently doing his best to blend well into the group. He constantly showed gratitude to his team members who helped him feel comfortable in a new environment. Hong also reminisced about his life in Hanyang University’s volleyball team. Hanyang University has been constantly participating in the universities’ volleyball leagues and is showing fine grades. 16 students participate in the volleyball team, and they practice enthusiastically. “It is definitely an outstanding team. Most players have talent, making the team expect development every day,” explained Hong. However, he also explained about his hardships. Since his major had classes on the ERICA campus, he and other students had to travel to the Seoul campus after classes ended. He remembered, “We had to put extra care into our health since it was a harsh schedule. But it was truly worth it.” Pictures of Hong in Hanyang university and the Skywalkers. (Photo courtesy of Hong) Life of volleyball Hong's volleyball career is comparatively shorter than that of other players. He first started volleyball when he was in high school, even though he initially prepared for a sports major. “I had no interest in my studies, leaving me with no decent choice of universities. My parents, looking at me doing nothing, recommended me to at least find a thing I can do consistently. That’s how I started volleyball.” After he started volleyball, he found not only an interest but also talent in volleyball. He loved practicing volleyball and was fascinated by it. He realized he started it way later than others, and therefore devoted more hours into volleyball. He would come earlier than others, and practice movements he wasn’t good at. His effort eventually did give him a wonderful result. Hong’s life, however, wasn’t all that ideal. To sports players, their body condition is crucial. Especially when a lot of jumping is required, the cruciate ligaments of a knee plays an important role. During a match in university, his cruciate ligament was ruptured when he bumped into another player. Moreover, this fact did not cause a major problem. Hong reminisced, “I was too arrogant with my body when I wasn’t supposed to. My body recovered better than others, so I ignored the precautions and continued playing games.” His cruciate ligament therefore ruptured again in the same year and came to a point when the doctor suggested him to quit volleyball. “I deeply thought about what I can truly enjoy other than volleyball that whole day. However, I came to a conclusion there is nothing other than volleyball that makes me happy and enthusiastic. The next day, I told my mother in earnest I would give it one last try.” This incident became a turning point to Hong. He also explained the fears that came along with an injury. “It’s not the injury itself that’s most threatening. It’s not the fact you can’t perform as well. The most threatening part is that you start making an excuse for why you shouldn’t try your best. You start self-justifying yourself and that’s actually the very problem a lot of the players quit after their injuries.” After he overcame his injuries, he is now back up again showing what he has. When asked for his happiest moment in his volleyball life, he didn’t pick a particular incident. “I am happy every single moment I play volleyball. I now have a job of what I like the most. Why should I have a particular moment?” smiled Hong. "I love every moment I play volleyball." Now, as a professional volleyball player, he is planning to do his best again in his status. “Most volleyball players wish to become a member of the national team, and that’s my final dream as well. It’s definitely not easy, but I want to be able to play games with the Taegeuk mark on my chest,” wished Hong. As he explained that volleyball is not a game that is decided by the individual abilities, he elucidated, "it is a sport with the power of unity that is the most emphasized since players have to sacrifice themselves for a better attack." He promised, “As a rookie, I want to show my liveliness and passion for the Skywalkers. I wish to be a player who can excel while fitting well into the team.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park young-min

2017-10 16

[Student]Hanyangian Ballerina Blossoms Korean Dream on World Stage

There is an old saying that “ballet is like dreaming on your feet.” Kim Min-ah (Dance and Well-being, the ERICA campus, 4th year) has recently become the dream of South Korea, as she won the 2016 IDO World Ballet and Modern Jazz Championship. It was the first time in history that an Asian ballerina has taken the crown of the IDO (International Dance Organization). Currently, Kim received an Invitation to perform at the IDO World Gala (social occasion with special performances) in Poland. News H met Kim to hear her stories on the life-long desire for contemporary ballet and further hopes to achieve. Kim is last year's winner of the IDO World Ballet and Modern Jazz Championship. Destined dream of ballet It was in her third grade in elementary school that Kim first became intimate with dance. “All of my school friends were learning jazz dance at the moment. So I followed the trend and joined the club,” laughed Kim. After learning jazz dance for three years, Kim was informed about the beauty of ballet. “Even though I was learning and studying ballet, I felt like I was playing and dancing to the music with joy. That is when I thought ballet might be my destiny,” explained Kim. Kim was a gifted child with artistic talents. From music and dancing to art, Kim had tried out a variety of artistic subjects. However, the one that always interested Kim was ballet. “All the other subjects bored me out, except for one--ballet. Since ballet costs a lot for lessons, I decided that this would be my goal to dedicate all my passion into for good,” said Kim. Kim's performance at the IDO 2016 (Video courtesy of IDO) Kim is now majoring in contemporary ballet which is a genre that incorporates both classic ballet and modern dance. Expressing emotions that Kim felt in certain experiences or events often becomes the main theme of the performance. Usually, the choreographer sets specific dance movements to the music. However, the three minute long gala performance is choreographed by Kim herself. “The piece that I will perform at the gala is about the Syrian refuge crisis. The picture of a small child bleeding in the midst of war inspired me to perform the dance,” said Kim. Hopes to popularize ballet Despite her young age, Kim has numerous magnificent, grand titles such as ‘first in South Korea’ or ‘first Asian winner.’ However, with her family and friends rooting for her, Kim is not afraid of the pressure. “When I feel down, I try to walk around the city and empty my thoughts. After reminding myself of how important ballet is to me, and how everyone I cherish cheers for me, I can return to my original position and continue practicing,” said Kim. The biggest motivation of Kim to pour more ardor into ballet comes from the improvement of her dance. “When I see myself improving through video clips, I feel more energetic and passionate,” explained Kim. However, Kim is also worried that contemporary ballet is not popular among the public, and she feels the duty to convey the beauty of ballet to people. “I think it is also my responsibility to excel at all ballet contests so that I can let more Koreans to be aware of the beauty in it,” smiled Kim. "Improvement makes me more passionate, and passion leads to greater development." As a senior at Hanyang University (HYU), Kim is now preparing for a new path for her future. Her current dream is entering a dance company abroad to learn more on ballet in depth. “I was the fortunate girl to find my talents at a young age. I hope all of my fellow friends at HYU will also find the right path and feel the joy in it!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Young-min

2017-10 15

[Student]Winners of 2017 International Robot Contest

Held annually in the Korea International Exhibition and Convention Center (KINTEX), the International Robot Contest (IRC) is the largest robotic event in Korea. In October of 2017, IRC once again welcomed contestants from various countries such as Japan, Singapore, and Malaysia. Of several categories of the contest, the gold prize winner of the TurtleBot Auto Race area is the team Real Bapdodook (rice thief), consisting of four students from the Department of Robotics: Jung Hyun-cheol (3rd year), Lee Do-gyu (2nd year), Cho Min-soo (3rd year) and Jung Min-jae (3rd year). Real Bapdodook's gold prize (on the left) and their finished product Ganjang-gae-jang (on the right) (Photo courtesy of Real Bapdodook) Intense concentration as when eating “The Department of Robotics was established in 2013, and we are the first group of students to be admitted into the department. The contest let four of us to come together.” TurtleBot is a robot with open-source software, which is the main item used for the event. All four students were highly interested in it, which became a main motive for them to team up together. The name of the team seems quite unique to be a robotic contest entry. Rice thief, Bapdodook in Korean, is a term referring to food so delicious that it arouses an appetite to the point where one finishes a bowl of rice instantly. The members decided to name their team Real Bapdodook because when people are eating “rice thieves,” they concentrate on eating so much that they become silent. Similarly, the team wanted to focus their TurtleBot to the extent where they become wordless. Fittingly, the name of their robot is Ganjang-gaejang (soy sauce marinated crab), because the finished look of their work resembles the shape of a crab—soy sauce marinated crab is one type of Korean food considered to be a bapdodook. “We decided to participate in the contest because even though it had been three years since we entered the department, we had not really had any opportunity to actually make robots or create an algorithm that goes along with it. With the desire to utilize what we have learned, we searched for robotic contests and came across the IRC TurtleBot Auto Race." Besides, they wanted to put robot operating system (ROS) into use and get a real-life lesson from experience. From left to right: Jung Min-jae, Jung Hyun-cheol, Cho Min-soo, and Lee Do-gyu. (Photo courtesy of Real Bapdodook) The gold mine of efforts “By the time we finished preparing for the contest, we wished to have some extra days of breaks, but the new semester greeted us.” Preparing for the contest throughout their entire summer break, there were largely three impasses the team had to jump over. First and the most difficult barrier was studying ROS (coding system of communication among sensors of the robot). Since TurtleBot was an ROS-based device, not knowing it will make it impossible to start the project. The team had no helping hand to tutor them with the equipment, so they started from scratch by studying with online materials. Another barrier was assembling different parts. No matter how supreme a single part is, it is of no use if it does not fit into the robot. From finding out how an equipment works to figuring out how to harmonize the whole system, there were piles of problems to solve. Lastly, “tuning” the robot to the course of the contest field was a big issue. In order to make the robot run perfectly on its own, this step was essential. This step took the longest because there was simply no other way than to test with trial and error. The track of TurtleBot Auto Race. (Photo courtesy of Real Bapdodook) “Hard work pays off” is what the team said after going through long, exhausting periods of preparation and finally tasting victory. Ganjang-gaejang was outstanding in its speed and stability, but it was especially praised for staying close to the basic, provided materials. While other teams dismantled the TurtleBot and added additional parts that costed much, Real Bapdodook focused on maximizing the efficiency with what was given, proving that winning requires no fancy accessories. The contest offered no cash prize but an upgrade of the TurtleBot, which the team is willing to use for the department’s ROS education. Ganjang-gaejang was excellent in line-tracing as well, which was a crucial factor in making it the winner. From discerning lights, signs, and barricade to safely passing tunnels, the team’s robot successfully completed the given missions. Finishing the track with impressive line-tracing at a speed faster than other teams, the team Real Bapdodook proved its competency. Looking forward to participating in more robotic contests in the future, the members are proudly holding the gold prize in their hands. (Photo courtesy of Real Bapdodook) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr