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2017-10 02

[Student]A Donor and a Champion

“A lot of people say I am already successful, and they congratulate me for my achievements. However, I only think this is the beginning,” remarked Won Doo-jae (Sports and Well-being, 2nd year). Won is the key player of Hanyang’s soccer team and one of the members of the national team, U-18 and U-19. In the summer of 2017, he has also joined the J2 League’s Avispa Fukuoka team, proving his competence. On top of his achievements, Won has made headlines because he has donated one hundred million won to Hanyang University (HYU), claiming that Hanyang is the place of his growth. Ups and downs As everything starts small and trivial, Won’s interest in soccer first sprouted when he was in elementary school. First regarding soccer as his hobby and the subject of his special activity club at school, he stepped into what later became his career path, unknowingly. Entering middle school is when he was determined that he wanted to be engaged in soccer professionally, deeply consulting his parents about his decision for the first time. This led him to enter a middle school that had a soccer team and that provided him the opportunity to receive lessons and training. This continued throughout his high school days. By the end of his high school years, Won was put on the brink of going through a surgery due to his sports hernia (a symptom in the pubis are common to sports players). It was the time he was about to join the national representative’s team, so Won was put in a serious dilemma. His desire to join the team, in the end, overpowered his necessity to go through the surgery. Enduring both pain and fear of his symptom, he says, “was the most difficult time for me so far.” He postponed his surgery to a future time by which his symptom was not only on the right side of his pubis but also on his left. Won's back number in the team Avispa Fukuoka is 6. (Photo courtesy of Sportal Korea) Climbing the long way and overcoming hardship, Won became who he is today. He recalled, “I would say my professional debut game was the most memorable game of all. The game was held in July of 2017 against Yamagata, the home team of the league. I was more excited than nervous because I went through so much harsh training.” Won is currently taking a year off due to his tight schedule of matches and training. He had the urge to become an official soccer player so enthusiastically that it became his priority over academics. “I guess soccer was a louder call,” chuckled Won. He is playing in the league in Japan now! Before matches, Won says he watches a lot of videos of soccer matches and listens to energizing music. Right before going to the match, he makes sounds with his hands to prevent himself from being too nervous. The secret to maintaining his stamina, according to Won, is running in the games, since soccer is a sport that involves a large field and the players incessantly run. “Participating in many games and going through training as a team beforehand helps to keep up my stamina.” During the game, however, he does not have the conscience to think about anything else but to focus on the game. "Untill I reach my full potential!" (second to the right on top) (Photo courtesy of Korea Football Association) Shoot goal to the next stage! “What I find attractive about soccer is its usage of the feet, perhaps the most difficult part of the body to handle, to maneuver the ball so freely,” remarked Won. Soccer is his passion, career, and life. He expressed his gratitude to all his coaches and especially to HYU. “Hanyang is the place of my growth” is what Won said when donating a hundred million won to the school. To elaborate, he described Hanyang as the place he grew up through activities and lessons. Just like he did in middle and high school, he met a great coach and received constructive advice and training that led him to become who he is. His times of acquiring skills and accumulating experience has surely seemed to pay off. “My achievements so far are the beginning of my life. I believe there is a long path lying in front of me, and I can do better, infinitely. To reach my full potential, I’m never stopping or giving up!” cheered Won. His goal is to become a better soccer player than he is today, nourishing his potential with his passion. He believes there is no stop to improving, which explains all his hard work and relentless effort to pave the path that lies ahead of him. "Hanyang is where I grew up." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-09 26

[Student]Two Brave Hanyangians Saving Lives

Stepping into emergency situations requires a great deal of courage and training. This week, News H met two of the brave lions of Hanyang, Lee Mok-wang (Division of Sport Science, 3rd year) and Lee Beum-hee (Chinese Language & Literature, 1st year). Both students saved a man’s life by operating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Lee Mok-wang is explaining the situation. Q1. Could you explain the situation when you found the patient? Beom-hee: I was on patrol in the Dongdaemun area with a police lieutenant as usual when a couple walking in front of us reported the patient. The man was laying on the ground and his body was stiff, breath being short. His eyes were flipped, so I immediately felt something was wrong with him. Mok-wang: An evening before Memorial Day, I went to Korea Integrated Freight Terminal for a one day part time job. While I was working, a man about five meters away from me collapsed while grabbing a bar. Nobody knew he was having cardiac arrest. We all just thought he was taking a break. I had my eyes on him because I felt something was going on. Then I realized his breath was abnormally rapid and deep. Q2. Why were you around the area? Beom-hee: I am serving as a tourist police, and a tourist policeperson patrols tourist attractions such as Dongdaemun, Myung-dong, and Hongdae in rotation. I have never seen a person passed out on the ground on my past patrols, though. Mok-wang: I was working in the terminal as a daily part timer. I was planning to donate the daily wage to the Ansan Shalom Welfare Center because I always wanted to share with people in need. I find it very lucky for someone who can perform CPR to be there at the moment to save a man’s life. Q3. What was the first thought that came into your mind? Beom-hee: To be honest, I was scared at first. I am a policeperson but I have never seen anyone like that. But the uniform gave me a big sense of responsibility. Q4. What were the people around you doing at the time? Beom-hee: The police lieutenant that I was accompanied with told me that we have to tilt the patient’s head to open the airway. That’s when we realized his head was bleeding. As there were no more people than us and the initial reporters, I asked them to call for the ambulance. But they were already calling. The couple explained the situation to the paramedic on the phone and told me what he said. Mok-wang: They were in a state of panic, not knowing what to do. I asked a person to call the ambulance while performing CPR. It took about 10 to 15 minutes for the ambulance to come. Lee Beum-hee is holding an award from the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency. (Photo courtesy of Lee) Q5. How long did you operate CPR? What thoughts did you have during the operation? Beom-hee: It took about four to five minutes, but I wasn't so sure. Performing CPR was harder than I thought because I had to put all my weight to my arms. During the operation, the patient’s wife and young daughter came and were crying. Looking at his family being so worried, I couldn’t stop. Mok-wang: I performed for about 10 to 15 minutes, and it was tiring. But, because I major in sports, I work our regularly, and I think it helped a lot. Q6. When did you know that the patient would be okay? Beon-hee: As I was performing CPR, right before the ambulance arrived, the patient’s eyes came back to a normal position, and he was able to breathe on his own. I could feel he was coming back. I was so relieved. Because for the past four minutes of operation, he did not move or react at all. I was also frantic at that time, but I still remembered hearing an old gentleman saying, ‘oh, he’s alive now.’ Q7. When did you learn how to perform CPR? Beom-hee: I learned CPR in the army recruits’ training center. I couldn’t remember everything I learned at the moment, but I did everything that I remembered. Mok-wang: I learned it for the first time when I entered the military in the army recruits’ training center. After I was discharged from the military, I had an opportunity to learn once again in school. (Left) Lee Mok-wang is delivering his daily wage to the Ansan Shalom Welfare Center. (Right) Lee recieved an achievement award from the Dean of College of Sports and Arts. Q8. Did you get in contact with the patient after they got better? Beom-hee: Unfortunately I didn't. About two weeks after the incident, I heard that he was a professor in Macau through a news article, so I tried to find his contact on the university homepage. However, I could not find him. I did ask for his contact in the hospital when I saw him for the last time, but his wife told me they don’t have any contact in Korea. Mok-wang: I did not personally get in touch with him, but I heard that he is living in a tough environment. I am not expecting any thanks because I did what I had to do. I just wish he gets well soon. Q9. Is there a thing you would like to mention to others? Beom-hee: I would like to say something to the people who will learn CPR in the future. You might wonder if you will ever perform CPR in your life, but unexpected things happen in life in unexpected moments. I recommend you teach CPR to your family members, as anyone can have cardiac arrest, even at home. Mok-wang: Please pay attention during the CPR education. Many people disregard the precious education and let it pass by. However, if you learn the operation properly, someday you will be able to handle emergency situations well. We need to be conscious that cardiac arrest can happen to your family and friends. "I was able to realize the weight of a uniform through this incident. I hope I can manage future emergency situations better and more calmly." Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo and Park Young-min

2017-09 10

[Student]Being the Eye For the Blind

Staring deep into the horizon, a man was sitting by the sea watching the waves splashing against the thirty-foot cliff. Although this is not a sentence with diverse adjectives, people who have been to the sea at least once in their lives and have seen it with their very own eyes would be able to picture the scene quite visually in their own ways. “Because blind people are lacking one of their senses, they seem to be missing out on a lot of fun in the world, which is why we have decided to become the eye for them,” commented Shin Jung-ah (Information System, 3rd year). Team Hues, consisting of Shin, Sung Young-jae (Business, 4th year) and two developers from different colleges have created “Miris: Memorable Iris”, which is a device that enables blind people to hear the texts being read out into speech. Sung and Shin discuss the developments necessary for the Miris. Team Hues, light and hope for All Team Hues have already won grand prizes in several contests with their brilliant technological idea for its high degree of completion and marketability. Over 90 percent of blind people are illiterate in Korea, meaning that only 10 percent of blind people in Korea are able to read braille. Yet there are not so many devices that enable blind people to be able to read or study. Most of the devices are targeted towards the 10 percent of the literate blind since it is much cheaper to develop and is easier to do so through braille. What team Hues have targeted were those in the 90 percent majority of blind people who cannot read braille, although they could speak Korean. “It is very obvious that knowledge inequality comes from not the disability itself, but rather from the lack of developers trying to help blind people eager to learn more,” pointed out Shin. Miris is a small camera device that people can wear like glasses and connects with the earphones to let them hear the texts being read out. Through the text to speech (TTS) technology, the camera would analyze the fonts which would let the people “hear” the books they wish to read. What is more interesting is that Miris would have a bookmark system which would let blind people find the book they were reading, plus mark the pages that they have read. Through the RFID and NFC chips, the Miris sensors would scan the microchips and would react to the sensor. Since there are so many cutting-edge technologies involved in this one machine, such as image processing technology, OCR, the text to speech, and so on, Miris has yet to be commercialized as the miniaturization process has yet to be developed. As the team name represents, team Hues will continue to suggest new pathways of enlightenment for the blind. They believe true knowledge comes from books, even with the development of the Internet--and Hues is determined to bring a new dimension to the educational sector for the blind. "We would love to be the eye for the blind and help them read books." Kim Seung Jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Minju

2017-09 03

[Student]Writing as a Comprehensive Skill

What makes up a good song? Some would say good melody while others say good lyrics. Then, where do good melody or lyrics come from? Kang says, at least for the lyrics, it comes from everyday life. Kang Min-gu (Korean Language and Literature, Doctoral Program), a musician and a poet, unearthed his talent in writing when he was a young boy and developed that talent into his career. His discovery and strength in writing led him to become who he is today, an indie singer-songwriter and a poet by the name of Kang Baek-soo. A friend and the band Kang was schooled in all-boys middle school and high school in Korea, which completely eliminated any possible chance of school romance. When his friend presented a tempting idea, to make a band and perform at a all-girls high school, Kang could not help but accept the suggestion. This seemingly petty reason was the turning point of Kang’s life—this is how Kang began music. “I tried to have different hobbies such as sports and photography but they all didn't last long. Music is the only hobby that captivated my interest.” Entering Hanyang University and belonging to the College of Humanities, Kang naturally joined the band of the department, Dasalnolae. His ability of handling different instruments led him to be the main member of the band, especially in the times when only a few people joined the band. On one insignificant day, Kang saw his fellow member writing a song and making music. “At that moment, it looked easy and I thought, ‘why don’t I try writing a song myself?’” This is how he began writing songs. The lyrics of Kang’s songs come from his daily life as well. Just as he gets inspired by the little happenings in his life, his songs reflect the ordinary parts of his life and arouse a wave of empathy from the people who listens to his music. “I drink with my friends pretty often and every time, on my way back home at nights, I think about the memorable conversations I had because they could give me ideas for the lyrics.” One of his song, titled Wangsimni (click to listen), is a song based on his bitter feeling when he visited Wangsimni after graduating. The lyrics of his songs are easily relatable to those who have similar experience because they are not extraordinary. As an indie musician, Kang performs in music festivals, cafes, and other concerts he is called for. His nearest concert, The Wander Concert, will be held in few weeks on the shore of a cafe located in Incheon. Currently having seven music albums, hundreds of poems written, and four essays in books, Kang is actively engaged in his writing life. (Photo courtesy of Kang) A fine artist As a poet, on a different note, Kang insists on something of his own. When composing a song, he tends to take other people’s opinions into consideration because he aspires to produce music that people can feel attachment to. However, when it comes to poems, his own thoughts are all that matters. “To me, poems are like my identity. I take no other opinions and evaluate and judge my own poems on my own. No other peoples’ opinions are to be incorporated,” stated Kang, sternly. While his songs are for the public, his poems are for himself exclusively. Though he started his band and music by a coincidental chance, he firmly believes that his life path would still have navigated toward writing anyway. As a Korean Language and Literature major with his specialty in modern poetry, he regards his main job as a poet. Kang is preparing to publish his first collection of poems. He has written hundreds of poems so far and he is currently in the process of selecting the best ones of all. “I want to maintain my creative stamina and consistently produce my works.” He wants to be someone who maintains his job and be proud of the stacks of works he produces as time goes by. Reflecting his relatable and interesting songs and their lyrics, his collection of poems sure sounds unique and exciting to see. “Writing is my job. If I write on a manuscript paper, then it’s a poem. If on a music paper, it’s a song.” (Photo courtesy of Kang) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-08 21

[Student]Cinderella Law and its Failure

Growing up as a boy who loved to play games, Hong Sung-hyeob (Economics and Finance, Master’s Degree) has been growing his interest and passion for games until he sought his career in the company Nexon, one of the most successful online game producers of Korea. He recently published his master’s thesis on the topic of ineffectiveness of the Cinderella Law in Korea (shutting down of online games for adolescent from midnight to six in the morning) and revealed that the law is far from reaching its goals of guaranteeing teens’ sufficient amount of sleep by reducing the time for online games. “Games are my life!” Nexon was Hong’s first job, which he sought out of his pure enthusiasm for online games. During his interview for the job, Hong’s answer for the question why he applied for Nexon was fascinating: he was born for games, which genuinely reflected his heart for games. While Hong was working in the company, he did not belong to the game development department. Instead, he was doing subsidiary tasks such as managing games and their exports and creating events in the games. As a game lover, however, he wanted to do more than just ancillary jobs and do something worthwhile, incorporating his studies of Economics and Finance. The unprecedented topic he chose for his master’s thesis is regarded as an unique one, as it is somewhat irrelevant to the field. Nonetheless, Hong mentioned, “a lot of professors expressed their positive opinion toward my paper because it was something they’ve never handled before and the fresh topic was being dealt with from the perspective of our field for the first time.” As soon as he entered the graduate school, Hong was determined that his thesis paper would deal with any topics related to online games, because he wanted to research and analyze what he was truly interested in. When it was time for him to decide his topic, he realized that the Cinderella Law is one of the controversies regarding online games, as there has been heated debates on whether the law should be abolished or not. He puts an extra significance on the fact that he chose what he loved for his thesis incorporating what he studied at school. In other words, researching and analyzing statistics and data related to online games from the perspective of an economist was something special for Hong. Hong expressed his passion for games along with why he chose this topic for his paper. Cinderalla Law without returning Cinderellas The whole point of the Cinderella Law was to ensure sufficient amount of sleeping time for adolescent students who love to play games throughout the nights, as sleep critically affects their development. However, as Hong proved in his paper, the law was nowhere near reaching its goal. Statistics show that the amount of time adolescent students sleep before and after the law was implemented was, bizarrely, the same, indicating that the law is simply being futile and pointless. Hong used Korea Media Panel Survey Statistic’s data as the basis for his paper. The statistics testify the age range to time slot of online game players. By analyzing these data, Hong was able to extract the amount of sleep adolescents got before and after the law was implemented. The result, surprisingly, was only five or six minutes difference, and even that difference cannot be accounted by the law. There are three main reasons why the Cinderella Law is ineffective: students take advantage of their parents’ ID or residence number to get around the law, they play smartphone games as much as online games (smartphone games are not targeted by the law), and only domestic games are subject to the law. These reasons account for the failures of the law, clarified Hong in his paper. Hong's master's thesis deals with ineffectiveness of the Cinderella Law. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-08 20

[Student]Being Suit-able for All

Under the motto of “better design, better fit”, Ahn Ji-soo and Shin Yo-sup (Chinese Language & Literature) have set up their designer brand, “SUITABLE”. After setting up the brand in 2015, it has expanded its range of clothes from tailor-made suits to ready-made clothes and this year, women’s wear is ready to be launched. Since co-CEO Shin was on vacation, News H have met Ahn to hear about Suitable. Passion for Fashion Ahn was a natural born fashion star who loved to stand out in front of others. “I had the most shocking look out of all the freshmen when I first entered Hanyang University (HYU),” chuckled Ahn. With his Afro-hair bleached white, Ahn was always wearing the trendiest fashion on campus. “I didn’t really join a lot of clubs but I did work with ‘Campus style icon’ finding the fashion icon of different schools,” said Ahn. Being such a fashion star on campus, Ahn was always the one to reach for advice before going shopping. “I remember being so proud when my friend turned up so cool with a nice outfit after consulting with me,” recalled Ahn. After graduation, Ahn and Shin were both accepted to companies that they have always wanted. “I was good at my job but somehow, there was this empty feeling after returning home everyday,” said Ahn. It was the passion for fashion that was missing in Ahn’s life which he eventually realized after two years of work. “Shin first suggested about starting this business and I felt my heart beating so fast,” recalled Ahn. Shin takes care of most of the promotion and planning of the business while Ahn is responsible for designing clothes. “I always contemplate deeply about one issue and it works the same for designing as well,” explained Ahn. Trying to create clothes that he wants to wear everyday, Ahn says that he is proud to be a designer. Ahn tries to provide styling tips for their customers from head to toe. Philosophy in business “We use the best quality fabric that we can find,” explained Ahn. Comparing fabric from all over the world, Ahn and Shin tries to use the best that they could find and it has led to better quality in their finalized products. With high repurchase rate, Suitable is the type of brand that everyone loves after experiencing the product and its services. “We not only try to sell just our products, but we also try to give the best styling tips and advices that would suit our customers the best,” said Ahn. Providing the pride and hope everyday through their clothes is what Ahn wants to achieve. “There are days when we are filled with pride when we wake up in the morning and feel like we can do anything. I want all my customers to feel that way when wearing our product in the morning,” said Ahn. Suitable also exercises a lot of corporate social responsibility in real life through making tailor-made clothes for the disabled as well. “It takes a lot of time and effort to design a different type of shirt from the scratch,” explained Ahn. One time, Ahn had to design and create the shirt all over for a disabled customer and it took over two weeks to make the final product that fits perfectly. “He later visited our office wearing what I made for him and it looked perfect on him. Filled with pride, that customer thanked us which was very heartwarming,” recalled Ahn. Having big dreams of expanding Suitable into a global brand, Ahn and Shin wishes to enter a bigger market. With their philosophy and work ethics, it would be quite sure to please the customers as they have until now. “I hope everyone feels the pride when wearing our brand Suitable,” concluded Ahn. “I hope everyone feels the pride when wearing our brand Suitable.” Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 14

[Student]Spreading Awareness Through Entertainment (1)

A team named Game In Love (G.I.L) won the 2nd place in the Contest for the Good by Prudential Foundation of Korea recently. News H met the team leader Jung-woo Jin (Culture Contents, 4th year) and one of the team members Park Myung-yong (Culture Contents, 4th year) to hear about the details and motives that made such result possible. Team G.I.L is receiving their award from the Prudential Foundation. From the left, Myung-yong Park (Culture Contents, 4th year), Jung-woo Jin (Culture Contents, 4th year), Ho-suk Yang (Culture Contents, 4th year), and Dong-hyuk Kang (Computer Science,3rd year). (Photo courtesy of Jin.) Have you ever heard of hematopoietic stem cell before? This is the question both Jin and Park has been repeating on and off line for the past 4 months. To raise awareness of hematopoietic stem cell donation and change the common perception that the process must hurt, the G.I.L team went through a lot. After spending 14 days in Jeju just to complete the proposal and to present it in front of the executive members of Prudential Foundation, the G.I.L team made it to the top 10%. Then they had to carry out their actual plans such as developing mobile games or organizing offline campaigns. “We were very hurt when people think we are a bunch of weirdos asking for blood donation,” said Park, thinking back of the offline campaign in Sinchon. The G.I.L team also went to Hanyang ERICA Campus, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, and Hyupsung University during the festival season in May. Thankfully, many students were interested in the offline games they had in the booth and gladly joined their campaigns. “I still remember that there were a lot of people willing to register as a donor without any prize” reminisced Jin. Through such hard work, the team was able to have 191 people register as donors and make countless people aware of the patients looking for the 0.00005% chance of finding a matching donor. The G.I.L team is running its offline campaign on ERICA Campus. (Photo courtesy of Park) Changing the world slowly yet surely through games “I know it may sound cheesy and even absurd, but that is my motto.” Said Jin, proudly. After graduating Korea Game Science Highschool and coming to Department of Culture Contents, Jin naturally grew interest in social issues due to the geographic location of ERICA Campus. “I wanted to learn more and even solve the social problems through games because that is what I can do,” explained Jin. He is now working as an intern in a welfare foundation to pursue his roadmap. While offline campaigns definitely improved the general public’s awareness of the hematopoietic stem cell and the donation of it, the team’s main focus was an online game called ‘cell in love’. The player must solve mini quizzes to acquire ‘seeds’ to play the actual game, and if the player gets one quiz wrong, they must read related information on hematopoietic stem cell donation. This might look like one of the ‘educational mobile games’ which are in most cases nothing more than a digitized book in disguise, ‘cell in love’ is actually fun and even a bit addictive to play. As an adorable hematopoietic stem cell, a player has to go through cholesterols in blood veins and reach the girl who is waiting for the player’s donation. From the left, the main page, quiz page, study page, and game play page of ‘cell in love’. The game is available on google play store. Unlike Jin who had passion in social issues and resolving them, Park initially had not had much interest in such issues. “At the moment I was off school, I was looking for some experience. That was all,” said Park. However, a four-month long journey made him acknowledge that doing what one can do to make the life of others better and happier can be fun and inspiring, more than he initially thought it would be. “Now we both feel thankful that we can help others with my not-too-great talents,” said Park. Jin and Park now plans to work on various social issues in the future, utilizing games. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-07 31

[Student]Cross the World, Hanyangians!

The last day of finals end with the submission of the exam paper and the break begins. Students of Hanyang prepare for their break in all different ways, while there are a few who are packing their bags for travelling. News H met the travelers of Hanyang to share the joy of their journey. America, the land of dream “Travel is an opportunity to broaden my perspective.” “My school club members and I planned out our trip to America together,” said Jang. Her trip route was focused on the western states, especially on Grand Canyon. “I had great experience at America because it had a marvelous nature gifted but at the same time, developed its own culture and expressed it through modern places like Universal Studio,” said Jang. Jang's journey became better together with her friends from school club. (Photo courtesy of Jang) Jang picks her journey at the Grand Canyon as the best moment of the whole trip. “At the Horseshoebend, I felt like I could literally die walking under the burning sun, but when I reached the Antelope Canyon, I was captured by the magnificent beauty of America’s nature,” reminisced Jang. Jang strongly recommends other students to travel around the globe, because the four years at university could be the last moment people are young and free. “When we enter the world called society and start focusing on our careers, we might not be able to take a trip whenever we want to. So, let’s have fun while we can!” India, the holy world of Ganges “Travel is thirst. No matter how much I travel, I need more of it.” “I worked and saved money everyday for this trip. It was worth it,” said Kim. In the first week, Kim enjoyed the hot sunlight of India with her high school friends. In the vast continent, Kim had to utilize every possible transportation for her journey. “First, we took Indian cab, called Rickshaw, which is simply a bicycle. But the drivers deceived us with the price which made us fight against him and be thrown out in the middle of the street,” laughed out Kim. “Then we tried taking regional planes, sleeping buses, and night train, which tired us out completely,” said Kim. Kim was a superstar at India. “Indians were interested in a small Asian like me. Kids and families came up to me for a picture and a handshake. I have never been this popular!” chuckled Kim. This popularity helped Kim to bargain for price at markets. “When the seller asked for the price, I claimed for the 10% discount of the original price, and they usually accepted it. Please, don’t pay the full price when you visit India,” recommended Kim. Journey at India as a girl was the continuity of tension for Kim. “The day I arrived at India, there was a news on a foreign woman getting raped near the Ganges. This alerted us to rush to hotel right after sunset and always be careful of our security,” reminisced Kim. For Kim, travel is the source of energy. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Making new friends and contemplating on her life on the Ganges river became some of the most precious memories for Kim. She suggests to take a ride at Chulsoo’s Boat on the Ganges. Chulsoo is a Korean name which a travel writer Han Bi-ya of World Vision entitled for an Indian businessman on the Ganges. “Witnessing how the life and death coexists on the Ganges threw me some philosophical questions. I could see people taking bath, washing clothes, and floating dead bodies for funerals at the same time,” said Kim. “However, cows randomly swimming across the river while inquiring myself of philosophy was also a funny moment,” laughed out Kim. Kim suggests other students to make a bucket list for travelling and conquer each item off during the college years. “I think being a college student is standing on a thin boundary between a child and an adult. Perhaps, this is the only moment we can question about the future and ourselves deeply. These questions are often answered when we travel!” China, the endless wall of magnificence “Travel is arbitrary suffering. Because it is worth it.” “Simply saying, I was lucky to have a friend to accompany with, because he knew a lot about China,” said Lee. Lee’s friend has experience of living in Beijing, which helped them to plan their traveling routes easily. Lee’s trip was to go through at the Great Wall, the Forbidden City, Summer Palace, and the Temple of Heaven as quick as possible. “China had the pro-working class policy which stabilized and lowered the public price. So only with the money I saved from my allowance, I didn't had to move around in a tight budget,” reminisced Lee. "Feeling the history of thousands of years in China was quite of an experience!" (Photo courtesy of Lee) Even with the cheap drinks and street food, Lee said that he sometimes was deprived of Korean food. “The unique taste of Chinese food intrigued me at first, but sometimes I was in need of spicy Kimchi,” laughed out Lee. He was also overwhelmed by magnificent architecture of China. “China is close to Korea and is cheap to travel around. I suggest to take a visit. Besides, we are university students who can legally travel twice a year thanks to break!” Kota Kinabalu, where sunset differs everyday “Travel is impromptu. It is the privilege of a college student.” “In the song of 10cm, a famous South Korean band, the word Kota Kinabalu came up and that was the sole reason I left for travelling,” said Park. His original plan was to take a trip with two of his old friends and enjoy various activities and hot sunshine at the beach. “Studying everyday is a dull life. So I decided to visit Kota Kinabalu with relaxing routes of stopping by one beach per day,” reminisced Park. Stopping by a beach and feeling the nature overwhelmed Park everyday. (Photo courtesy of Park) As a college student, preparing for travelling expenses was one of the nuisances. However, Park says that is also the fun of a spontaneous trip. “Since I’m just a university student, I was able to get financial support from my parents for this journey which enabled me to enjoy various activities like paragliding and skin-scuba diving at the Tanjung Aru Beach,” smiled Park. His suggestions for the travelers of Hanyang were to make sure that the public security and transportation are safe and try out as many food as possible. “Please try out butter dipping shrimps and chili-crabs, when you visit Kota Kinabalu!” Europe, the world of dream and adventure “Travel is a dream. Before travelling, I dream about the trip. During travelling, it feels like I’m dreaming. After travelling, I reminisce the trip like a dream.” (Photo courtesy of Chea) “I thought that missing this golden time of life as a university student would let me regret for life. So, I just booked for the plane tickets,” said Chea. Travelling in Europe where the public price is high wasn’t an easy decision for her. Chea saved money under one purpose- trip to Europe. “I saved money for a year by tutoring kids at academies,” said Chea. The price paid off. Chea’s 40 days at Europe became the memory book that she can open up whenever she feels gloomy. “I went to Europe with my best friend and we say to each other every night that even the chitchat at the hotel with chips and beer would be missed when we go back,” laughed out Chea. "40 days in Europe passed by like 4 seconds!" (Photo courtesy of Chea) Journey with her best friend taught her to understand and to share same, but special memories with her friend. “We planned out our daily trip a day before at the hotel, which was thrilling. Eating street foods whenever we were hungry or walking to a destination endlessly to save money are something only the youth would do. This trip will be the greatest memories of my 20’s,” said Chea. Chea also suggests students to prepare international student ID for various discounts and use EU trains to save money. In addition, eating street food of that country will let one feel its culture through tongue, she says. “My friend got her phone stolen at Barcelona while eating hamburgers. It was absurd, but we call it a memory. Even a theft experience gleams in my mind as a special memory!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-07 24 Important News

[Student]Pitching Star Rookie

A small white ball rolled upon a 10 year old boy. Although the boy barely knew what baseball is, he started to have an interest in baseball by joining the elementary school club as if he was destined to. This was the outset of Choi Chae-heung (Major in Sports in Life, ERICA, 4)’s baseball story. Chosen as the only university student of the 2018 Professional Baseball Rookie Players by KBO (Korea Baseball Association), Choi is beginning to embark on his professional baseball life. Choi has been nominated as a first-year rookie player for 2018 professional league. Until the glorious day of professional nomination On June 26 of 2017, Choi was nominated as the professional rookie player by Samsung Lions, one of the top 10 professional baseball leagues. The nomination symbolizes the road to success for rookies as the KBO only designates the best players and professional baseball clubs scouts new rookies based on the nomination. On the list, Choi was the one and only university student to be designated. “Although this fortunate news enlightened me, the feeling of gratitude advanced my joy. I immediately wanted to thank to all who supported and trusted me,” reminisced Choi. Although Choi is now the talk of the town as a captivating left-handed pitcher, it was nothing like he never had frustrating moments in his life. He originally was a pitcher in middle school league which he was utterly absorbed into. However, when he stepped into the high school league, his position suddenly changed into a batter and a first baseman due to his body fitness. Because the throwing speed of a pitcher needs to exceed 100 km/h, Choi, who was relatively smaller than now, was forced to give up the pitching position. “Even though my position changed into a batter, I couldn’t give up on my dreams of pitching. Since I became pretty tall as 185cm and I’m left-handed, I thought I could set forth these strengths as a pitcher later,” said Choi. Chasing his goals, he incessantly practiced on batting and pitching at the same time. When Choi came to Hanyang University, his coach Kim Han-geun fatefully suggested him to change his position to a pitcher. “I strongly asserted to my coach that I need to become a pitcher, and he trusted me. Kim is my life-saver and I thank him a lot,” said Choi. Endlessly training, Choi is now the best rookie pitcher throwing a ball up to the speed of 148 km/h. Choi is playing at his last University League with passion. (Photo courtesy of Choi) However, for Choi who enjoyed the honor of one of the best high school batters before, this swift change came to him as a new challenge. “I had no idea how to even professionally practice pitching so I asked my beloved friend Lee Soo-min who is a professional pitcher at Samsung Lions and my high school friend,” explained Choi. To wear a crown, endure the weight When Choi was 10 years old, he suddenly got interested in joining the baseball club in elementary school. However, for a boy who never knew what baseball was, it was a though challenge. “When I first began baseball, I wanted to run away from it due to its intense training. However, I came back to the club after a month of escape because I was captivated to baseball,” laughed Choi. Choi’s childhood wasn’t wealthy which made his parents concern about his career. “My mother opposed to my baseball career due to its expensive costs and uncertain future. However, my father who always taught me to pursue what I want, supported me,” recalled Choi. Even when Choi's performance was in its downside ,being ousted at his first-year player draft of KBO, his father was there to support him. “I persuaded my father that I want to keep my career and I will do better at university. He trusted me and I really was drafted as a rookie pitcher at KBO in my college,” smiled Choi. As a professional player, Choi is looking forward his bright future. "I plan everything ahead in a yearly basis and I am hoping to stay at the premier league and be awarded as the Rookie of the Year without any injuries,” said Choi. For the plan, he currently is working on weight training to reduce chances of small injuries. “Because of the hard training intensity that I continued since I was a boy, I had to give up on getting good GPAs at university. Still, I’m trying to cover it up with better baseball capacity,” said Choi. Choi's baseball life is about to begin. Choi’s final goal is becoming a member of the national baseball team. “Being a role model will be something I would ever ask for as a baseball player,” said Choi. In Korea, it is common for baseball players to immediately join the league after high school graduation. However, Choi’s experience at Hanyang University strengthened his capability. “I strongly suggest junior players to come to HYU because coach and friends fully support and believe in each other. With efforts of personal training and ardor, I think HYU will grow you into better players,” suggested Choi. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-07 19

[Student]Early Bird Catches the Market

There is an old saying “early bird catches the worm”. In this case, the early bird caught the market of software education. Son Jin-ho (Department of Mechanical Engineering, 3rd yr) and his company Algorithm LABS was selected in one of the forty college start-ups by Hankyung’s Campus Job and Joy magazine. Focusing on Algorithm leading into successful results “I have never made it to the ranks for seven years in the regionals. I barely won the encouragement award. People like me are called ‘encouraged-ever-afters’,” chuckled Son. In 2002 when he began studying algorithm, there were not so many people studying the subject. Until he won the second prize ranking 13th in Korea Olympiad in Informatics, he never considered himself as elite in Algorithm. Even after coming to college, his GPA was never summa cum laude level. But the reason behind his recent success was focusing on one road. A professor in the department of Mechanical Engineering was looking for someone who could analyze data in his company, and Son opened his office door, trying to consult on his GPA. Son was scouted to the company as an intern, where all other employees had Ph.D. or equivalent level of education. Prior to the internship, he never knew where algorithms are used for. Through further experience in Samsung Membership program and more, he began to realize there is a demand in the market of algorithm experts. "Knowing that the education we provide will open many doors for the students motivates me the most" said Son, reminding of his students. Young CEO revolutionizing the way of software education Being taught how to program and construct the algorithm for as long as a decade, Son always thought the quality of education depends too much on the ability of individual instructors. The size of the class was too big for the teachers to give enough feedback to students, and the traditional method of education was highly passive and inefficient. Also, most of the institutions taught only coding, which does not meet the needs of the society. Therefore, Son came up with a system called ‘Flipped Learning’, which was designed to literally ‘flipp' the way of learning. Students study the rudimental concepts via online platform resembling MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses) and come to class no bigger than five to actually practice what they have learned already. This process enables students to freely ask questions and receives active feedback from the instructor. As algorithm questions tend to be highly complicated and require at least three hours to solve one, Son thought such style of learning would suit the condition of software education better. Son believes Flipped Learning is much more effective for the learners to completely understand and utilize what they have learned. “Students learned algorithm in this particular method for only four to five months are now winning the Korea Olympiad of Informatics.” says Son, proudly. Son is promoting his curriculum to students and parents in a classroom. (Photo courtesy to Son) Software education market’s wing beneath the wind of public education As the importance of coding and algorithm education is being emphasized now more than ever, Algorithm LABS provide a full package of original contents and platform. Attracting customers both in private and public sectors, Algorithm LABS seems like it is going to grow more in the coming year. Software subject will now substitute the Informatics subject in middle school and high school curriculum in Korea. Elementary school students will also be learn computer software starting 2019. “For the rest of the year, expanding our influence is our top priority” said Son. As a long-term goal, Son expects Algorithm LABS to provide full online courses and to even reach to the overseas market such as Vietnam “We’re still building our references,” said Son. Slow but steady, with a plausible goal and focus was how Son became the person who he is now and the way Algorithm LABS will grow further. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju