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2017-06 26

[Student]Run, Train, and Box!

With loud cheers from the audience, support from friends and family, nervous excitement throughout the body, and the tense atmosphere on the ring, the match was heated to its maximum and both players were growling with fierce spirit. An avid boxer, Kim Dong-woo (Department of Applied Physics, ERICA Campus, 4th year) has won his way up the tournament of 2017 Rookie Championship match hosted by Korea Boxing Federation and grabbed the champion’s trophy at last. Clenching his teeth and enduring extreme daily training, Kim shared his story as a newly rising champion. Spotlight on the ring “I remember the fatal blow that knocked my opponent down. I might have lost the match had it not been for that K.O.” reminisced Kim. It was at the last moment of his semi-final match that he struck a weighty blow and reeled his opponent backwards, after which Kim forcefully gave a succession of blows that finally knocked him down. “That was my favorite part of the match,” commented Kim. "My strength is throwing heavy punches." For the championship, Kim had a total of three matches at intervals within a couple of weeks. His quarter-final match was an unearned win, his semi-final a memorable win, and his final match the victorious one. After his semi-final, Kim had an injury on his left-hand ligament, which could have posed him a disadvantage. Fortunately, however, there was a one week delay for the final match and Kim gained an extra week until he healed. When Kim first steps on the ring, he naturally feels extreme nervousness sweeping over him. However, he manages to stay calm and hide that uneasiness by lightly running on the edges of the ring. “I need to show my opponent that I’m not nervous and that I’m confident. That’s the key to overcoming your nervousness.” Dramatically, Kim's opponent for the final match was his close friend who trained and prepared for this championship together. “I expected to see him at last, assuming that I would make it to the final match. We both trained really hard, so if we didn’t meet at the last match, it would mean one of us has been defeated, which is enervating,” remarked Kim. To both players, the final match was made more meaningful because they both made it to that round. "I can't stop training, because I can't get rid of the thought that my enemies are training harder." How it all began Kim first started boxing as a hobby as an attempt to lose weight after gaining a lot during exam weeks. As an uninterested starter, he never imagined becoming a boxing champion of Korea one day. After one year of training, Kim acquired his pro-boxer license and found himself completely befallen for boxing. Currently, as a senior at university, Kim is also concerned about his academics. He is facing the dilemma of either dedicating his life to boxing or going to a graduate school of physical education, only to pursue a career related to boxing. As for now, Kim's passion is directed toward boxing and he is doing what he enjoys at the moment. “I know I should care more and focus on my career at this point but I love boxing so much that I can’t stop training for it.” After his victory at the championship, he felt rewarded for all his hard work and was determined that his road to becoming the champion of Korea was further paved. Despite his family’s concerns and disapprovals, he has only reaped positive outcomes and is driven further by his growing passion for boxing. "I will not fail anyone who support me." "My ultimate goal is to become the champion of Korea." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Sang-yeon

2017-06 20

[Student]Pianist and Songwriter, Bamhaneul

One might have felt the wanting to listen to something calm and soothing, but also desired for a much modern type of music. Kim Ha-neul (Department of Piano, 2nd yr), stage name ‘Bamhaneul (night sky in Korean)’, is a rising star piano player and songwriter of indi music duo group Mozaroot. Recently on May 24th, Kim released his first single, ‘Seounhae (sad and hurt)’ with his singer partner Hanseul. Mozaroot and their fresh acoustic music The group name Mozaroot is the combination of the words Moja (hat in Korean) and Root, sounding similar to the famous performer and composer Mozart. “It means our music is unpredictable, just like the magic hat from which anything can come out. Basically, our team focuses on the reinterpretation of acoustics led only by piano and vocals,” Kim explained. Kim's stage name, Bamhaneul was created by merging his name and his first written song about his first love, 'After ten nights' sleep', when he was 19. "We have made a moderate success, and even though this is my first single album I feel that I have completed a team project," Kim added. “The song, ‘Seounhae’ was written when I was 20-year-old. At first I thought I would get to sing the song myself, but since I worked with my partner singer Hanseul, I changed the keys to a much higher version," Kim revealed. He additionally altered the melody that suited her more and also changed the lyrics to become more feminine. Kim explaining the meaning of his group name Mozaroot. "I first met Hanseul when I was recommended to became the part of Juice Media, an entertainment management company. Her voice had a taste of a fairy tale, because she is interested in musicals, and my music had a classical feel. That's how we got together as a team, because our music fitted nicely." Kim became the member of Juice Media when he took his leave of absence and taught piano lessons for students in need. “I met the head of Juice Media there who was working as a composing instructor, and that is how I was suggested to work there.” Kim said. A multiplayer of music Since Kim is the piano player and the songwriter of the group, he spends most of his day in front of the piano. "I first start with the title of the song when I compose it, and select the lyrics that I really want to put in the song. Then I move on step by step to build up the melody of the beginning and the middle of the song, the verse, and the chorus, " Kim explained. Kim with his music sheets. The sheets contain melody and lyrics for 'Seounhae'. When writing a song, Kim sets the beat according to his intended connotation, chooses appropriate chords of major or minor, such as C major and D major, and then adds on notes and rhythms. The ups and downs of his song depend on the mood and emotions, for example, high notes for tense mood and low notes for calm mood. When the lyrics contain negative words, he prefers major chords, and for positive ones, major chords. According to Kim, the songwriter's personality is reflected in his or her songs. "Because I like playing around with my friends, there are some puns, sarcastic and black humor in my songs. The name of one of those songs is ‘니 얼굴 실화냐 (I can't believe the state of your face)', " Kim chuckled. "I also like to make my songs difficult to translate in English. I believe Korean is the language which has the power to express something well," he added. Meaningful dreams of a promising music artist Kim not only works as a member of Mozaroot, but is a popular facebook page owner posting his songs, covers, and rearrangement of original pieces. He has 20 unreleased songs and wishes to compete in the Yoo Jae-ha Music Concours, a song writing and performance competition for discovering new and talented artists, in his near future. Kim singing and playing piano at his concert. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Recently, Kim donated all of the profits earned in his personal recital and his extra money for victims enforced to work as comfort women by the Japanese military during WW2. “I think music is for expressing some things that are difficult to say in words. Due to my belief that the incident that the victims had to handle was one of the saddest events in Korean history that words cannot express, I decided to donate the earnings and planning to donate more to help people in the future.” Kim said. “I want to make a masterpiece of a song, even though I don't exactly get what it is yet. I don't want to make my song to be heard like one gulps down an 'instant food', but create it so that it can give the listener different feelings each time it is heard. Say, my idea of a successful career as a songwriter would be if my song is played in my funeral, and every person there recognize it. However most of all, I belive continuous effort is the road to success.” Kim grinned. Kim aspires to become a songwriter and compose music that recurs again and again in people's memory. Click here to visit Mozaroot's facebook page. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-06 12

[Student]A Woman Who Ran in Desert for Charity

‘Charity run or donation through sports’ is one of the emerging trends to financially support people who are in need of help. In Korea as well, there are increasing number of people choose to express their passion as a way to raise money for donation. One of the best examples was found among Hanyang University (HYU) students, Kim Chae-wool (Industrial Information Studies, 2nd year). From last April 30th to May 6th, Kim participated in Sahara Desert Marathon and succeeded in fundraising over 7 million won (approximately 7 thousand dollars) which was donated to Korea’s first and only children rehabilitation hospital. Message of Hope Witnessed in The Ironman Triathlon Sahara Desert Marathon is known as one of the four toughest marathon on earth. (Other three include the Gobi March in China/Mongolia, the Atacama Crossing in Chile and The Last Desert in Antarctica. This year due to the IS, it was held in the Namib Desert.) Participants, or runners have to run total 250km for six nights and seven days without any external support except for water and sleeping bag at nighttime. Other essential equipment have to be carried in personal bag packs which usually weigh up to 11 to 12kg. A lot of people surrounding Kim, her parents and friends worried of her application for this extremely challenging marathon. However, Kim simply had to do as she planned because she had a goal in her mind. The biggest motivation for Kim's challenge was from the sign of strong love and hope she saw in the Ironman Triathlon. One of the main events that motivated her to participate in this marathon traces its date back to 2015 when she volunteered as a staff in a Korean Ironman triathlon. In a sports competition where a participant has to swim, ride a bicycle, and run a marathon without a break, Kim witnessed a father on the race with his son suffering of a rare disease. “I felt like a hammer just smashed right in my head,” reminisced Kim. What Kim witnessed was a lively scene of a man running with his son in a sports competition which is even hard for a runner on his or her own could complete. “Even after the race, I wasn’t able to forget what I saw, and decided I would also be the one who can give hope to such disabled young children through my own challenge,” said Kim. Her first grand step was to participate in an Ironman triathlon herself. In the same competition where she witnessed the father and the son, she ran with the goal to donate all the participation fee for disabled children. After preparing for about a year, she could finish the cousrse and make her first donation. “But then, I thought, why stop here? there must be better ways to help more children who needs support,” said Kim. Kim posing in front of the fininshing line of the marathon. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Even on a Tight Schedule as a Working Student That idea was the start of the whole plan to run the marathon. In the following year, she encountered desert marathon via Youtube and thought it was the perfect one for fundraising. “Even if it’s little, I wanted my fundraising plan and challenge could raise more awareness of lack of child rehabilitation hospital in Korea,” explained Kim. Kim was the youngest participant out of all 110 runners from all over the world. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Of course, preparing for a desert marathon required more training for Kim and she started to work out day and night even on her tight schedule as a working student. “Before going to work, I went to swimming centers in the early mornings and during lunch breaks at work, I often skipped my meal and went for a run in a park in front of my office. It was actually really tough because I had to go to school after getting off from the work as well,” remembered Kim. Even without a personal trainer or any other professional help, she continued to push herself to a harder training. For a fundraising, Kim utilized her personal blog which she used to post her workout journeys. On her blog, she explained in a detail why she planned this donation project from the beginning to what contest she is participating. Rewards included hand-written letters on a back of a picture she took herself in the desert. As a result, more than 160 people, including Kim’s acquaintances supported the crowdfunding which amounted up to 7 million won in total. On the middle of the Hot Namib Desert Kim walking in the middle of the Namib Desert. As a nickname of the desert marathon can easily tell, Kim did encountered hardships during her seven days race. On the last course of the race, which is called a ‘long day’, participants had to run about last 80km out of the whole 250km. “The last day was the hardest, not only because of the length of the course, but also because of the pain in my knees,” said Kim. Even before coming to Namib, her knees were in a severe condition due to some hard core trainings. “I really wanted to give up because of the extreme pain but I could not give up because of all the supports I have received,” said Kim. After taking proper medication, with strongly clenched fists, she started to run back on track and was able to successfully finish the course on time. Kim’s first desert marathon race was over, but she is now preparing for her bigger plans, to run rest of the three marathons before she graduates. “I really hope better perception of donation could be spread in Korea. It is not a hard or difficult thing to do, only what people need is courage. Also, through sports donation, people can be healthy while helping people so I wish more people would give it a try,” said Kim. A bigger vision of Kim is now to run rest of the three desert marathons. (Photo courtesy of Kim.) Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-05 22

[Student]Writing Songs of Memory

“Under the deep ocean, hundreds of unbloomed flowers…” starts the song Flower of Truth, composed by Park Soo-jung (Department of Applied Music, 2nd year, ERICA Campus). Believing in the necessity of remembering the MV Sewol tragedy, Park, as a young composer, has been writing songs about Sewol in hopes of reminding people about the incident. Collaborating with the youth musicians supporting organization Sing About Chu, Park recently presented her new tribute song Flower of Truth. She expresses her deep sorrow and regret over the disastrous event through the song. Flower of Truth Commemorating the 3rd anniversary of the MV Sewol incident, Park wrote and dedicated this song to the students and their families, as an attempt to represent the consolation and condolences of the public. The overall mood of the song is dismal and depressing as it tries to reflect the reality surrounding the incident. The underlying message she tried to convey was criticism toward society’s changing perspective of the event which grows more and more nonchalant and negligent. She pointed out the nonsensical attitude of some people, and wrote this song in compensation of those negativities. Flower of Truth criticizes the inappropriate attitute toward Sewol and its victims. “I sometimes see ridiculous remarks by people online such as ‘enough with Sewol,’ ‘I’m tired of hearing about this issue already,’ ‘It's had enough attention’ and so on. It makes me angry to see how cruel and indifferent people are.” By including the line “someone’s pain is someone’s mockery,” Park intended to reproach those who spoke improperly of the Sewol incident. Repeated in the song is the lyrics “make it bloom, make it full bloom,” by which she meant the bloom of flowers in people’s minds, the flower of truth, and never forget what happened. “I was taking a nap on the day of Sewol’s third anniversary, and I had a strange dream. In it, I was drowning in the ocean, which gave me enough fear and pain to wake up terrorized. I will never be able to imagine or understand the students’ awful horrors that they went through that day,” expressed Park. Such vividness solidifed in her mind that the pain and terror of the students, not to mention the scars left on their families, should never be overlooked and nor be forgotten. Park and Composition When composing a song, Park gets inspiration from anywhere and everywhere. The little thoughts and ideas that pass by her mind or the objects she sees develop into lyrics and melodies. For Flower of Truth, she found the melody after a shower. As a music major, she has written many songs, the most representative one being The World, dedicated to people who have low self-confidence and many insecurities, to boost their confidence and to shift their minds towards a more positive view of themselves. “I chose to major in composing music because as a high school student, the only joy and hobby I had was playing the guitar and singing along. I was emotionally going through hard times, but I was able to find comfort in music.” As a young composer, Park’s dream is to one day become a composer whose name is synonymous with great music and the music in which people find energy and strength. "I want to compose music that lifts people up." Click to watch Park's Flower of Truth Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Hye-im

2017-05 01 Important News

[Student]Hanyangian Brothers on the Soccer Field

When players flutter their sweat and passion in the air on a soccer field, the fans watch the direction a ball is heading to with bated breath. The fierce competition, earnest desire for victory, and both psychological and physical pressure are what soccer players must bear on the ground. In Hanyang University, there are two brothers who chose to walk this path- Lee Dong-hee of the Division of Sports and Well-Being and Lee Gun-hee of the Department of Sports Industry. Life of Hanyang soccer players Even though they were brothers grown at same home, their beginnings of soccer life were different. Dong-hee: I began playing soccer in my first year at elementary school. My father, who had a dream of becoming an athlete in his early age, suggested me to do so. From then, I lived with my coaches or my teammates, only to practice soccer. Gun-hee: My start was a bit different, because I had no interests in sports. When I was in my sixth grade at elementary school, I just became a goalkeeper for no reason. When I found out that I was a fast runner, I became an offense, and I began to grow my dream as a soccer player. Dong-hee: I went to a high school located in the rural area, so it was hard to be recognized by the coaches in Seoul. I had lucky opportunities to play against Hanyang University during my high school years for three times. This way, I could be scouted by my coach and come to HYU. I hope more opportunities will come to players at rural areas, because many of them have skills and efforts that deserve chances. Gun-hee: Unlike my older brother, I went to a high school in Seoul, and got accepted to Hanyang University. I thought that HYU would be a great home for me, because my brother is there and, also because of its environment. The coaches are nice and the facilities are considerate of players. I am blissful about my soccer life at HYU, except for my brother’s high temper. (laugh) Dong-hee: Just like Gun-hee said, the coach always tries to solicitude us, considering our conditions, schedules, and needs. As a sub-captain of a team, I have burdens that I have to encourage and criticize teammates at the same time. Also, managing soccer schedules and school education is another nuisance for us. Lee Dong-hee (left) and Lee Gun-hee (right) are talking about their soccer life. One year is a long run for Hanyangian soccer players. From February, Hanyang team participates in the Spring Soccer League, and the U-League (University League), until September. Also, between June and August, players compete against 16 other teams at the National Sports Festival. When most of the leagues are over, Hanyang soccer team leaves for the off-season training during the winter to constantly fit in shape. The Lee brothers on the field Both brothers take great responsibilities on the soccer field. The older brother Dong-hee is a midfielder and Gun-hee is a front-line offense. Despite the great pressure they must bear, Dong-hee is now a sub-captain and Gun-hee has already scored multi-goals at the U-league. Q. What are some aspects of each other that you want to take after? Dong-hee: My brother Gun-hee is sincere on the field. Before playing games, be manages his mental conditions and is able to calmly score at games. Gun-hee: Dong-hee embodies great fundamental skills and fitness. Even though I try to be calm when faced with the goalpost, it is still hard for me to take care of my health conditions. I am affected by the time when I play soccer, but Dong-hee is consistently good during the game, whether it is morning or evening. Q. What are your ultimate goals? Dong-hee: I want to enter a K-League (Korean League) team in South Korea. Also, I wish to wear a Tae-guk mark (South Korean Flag) on my uniform and represent my country with my brother. Fame is not what I desire, but long-lasting soccer life. Thus, I will always confront soccer earnestly, also to satisfy my grateful coach who trusts me. Gun-hee: I want to become a memorable player in the end. My favorite soccer player is Lewandowski of FC Bayern. Just like him, I want to be the best offense who results in constant scores. The two passionate brothers stand as the bright future of HYU. Parents of the Lee brothers are very proud of their sons, but try not to root for them intensely. They lower their sons’ conceit, if they have to. Under such wise parents, the Lee brothers are always immersed into soccer and practicing. “When I visited Germany from HYU, I realized that general environments such as facilities, coaches, and self-pride are different from Korea. I wish our country will someday provide such comforts and considerations for all our players,” said Lee. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-04 10

[Student]Marathon, Veni, Vidi, Vici!

“At least I ran all the way” is a famous quote by Murakami Haruki, a famous novelist who gets motivated to write through running. Moon Sam-sung (Department of Sports Industry, 4th year) is also a runner who doesn't believe in quitting. Although he injured his fibula (a bone parallel to tibia) 5 weeks before the Seoul Marathon, held on March 19th, Moon decided to run all the way, and he won the Master’s division. Career as a runner Moon started his career as a runner at the age of 10. Moon was Jung Jin-hyuk's training partner for about 7 years. Jung is currently a marathon runner at KEPCO. Living ust a few meters away from each other in the same neighborhood, Moon was able to run alongside Jung, while holding to his dream of becoming the best runner in Korea. “My partner Jung has been the greatest gift that I could ever hope for. Thanks to him, I was able to win the biggest tournament in my middle school years twice in a row,” recalled Moon. The concept of a running partner is of great importance since partners motivate each other to reach their fullest potential and achieve the best in a shorter period of time compared to training alone. Moon remembers his childhood years as a runner. One tip that Moon gave when dealing with injuries was to never stop exercising. Even if you are injured, according to Moon, workout routines must be kept although not to your fullest capacity. “Your running ability will eventually return once you are able to train again. There is no need to be pressured mentally even though others may be training harder than you are,” said Moon. He claims that marathons all come down to mental strength after the 35km mark. “Anyone can train to run up to 35km. It’s after the 35km mark that people fail,” said Moon. He likens that stage as “not being able to eat anything for one week, being out of breath, and hammers being thrown on the legs with every step." Hard work pays off The 2017 Seoul Marathon was the first tournament where Elites (Korea Athletics Federation Runners) and Masters (Non-professional runners) started the race at the same time. Moon won the Masters division this year. Right after entering Hanyang University in 2011 on a full-scholarship, Moon quit his career as a professional runner due to a knee injury. After five years of inactivity, Moon started preparing for marathon running again last year. “Although people warned me not to run in this race, I wanted to try my best due to the hard work that I had put in my training sessions.” Moon, running in the 2017 Seoul Marathon. During his period of inactivity, Moon worked as personal trainer and recently started working as a coach at 'Bang Sun-hee Academy'. After completing military service, he tried saving up money for university by working as a personal trainer. “As I worked, I realized that I should eventually attend university and get a degree,” said Moon. He started running half marathons last year, and, in order to be ready for the full marathon, he had to lose about 10kg. “I prepared for the Seoul Marathon for about 100 days, and I was proud to win the race and prove my skills as a coach,” said Moon. In the first month, Moon trained on sprints, the second month on endurance, and the last month on both speed and endurance. Moon wishes to participate in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Although it has been a hard race so far, life itself is a marathon, and Moon plans on preparing for the realization of a bigger dream. “I want to participate in the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 along with my former partner Jung,” said Moon. With such vivid dreams, we have yet to await Moon’s next step as a professional runner. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-04 03 Important News

[Student]Spreading Warmth through Handwritten Letters

On a peaceful street called gamgodanggil of Jongno-gu, Seoul, stands a pink postbox. The black sign shows that after writing letters about one’s worries, the replies will come back within one or two weeks. Pausing at the sign for a moment, people then decide to stop by to disclose their worries to somebody unknown. The postbox named ongi, meaning warmth in Korean, is installed by Cho Hyun-sik (Department of International Studies, 4th yr), after reading “Miracles of the Namiya General Store” by Keigo Higashino by chance. “The overall plot of the book is that the characters from the past write letters about their worries to the characters of the future. I focused on the idea of revealing worries and being comforted through exchanging letters,” Cho said. Cho explaining the reporter about the operations of Ongi Postbox. The power of slowness and sincerity The plan was carried out due to his thought that even though SNS is popular these days, there are few people who listen carefully to others’ stories by heart. On the contrary to today’s social conditions which handwritten letters are disappearing, due to the discomfort that comes from slowness, Kim believes that there is a special value of the letters. “The slowness of handwritten letters would allow people to be relaxed enough to open up their hearts and disclose their stories,” Cho emphasized. Cho is the chief manager of Ongi General Store, with three other managers and 60 or so volunteers or ‘clerks’. The managers and the clerks write replies to the worries of people sent through Ongi Postbox. The installation of the postbox was on late Feburary this year, and the place of its location was chosen due to Cho’s personal preference of the street’s quiet, comfortable, and slow atmosphere. “I found ten people who wanted to be clerks of the Ongi General Store from the Internet, but then we wound up getting lots of letters which were more than we expected, ” Cho said. Merely a week after the installment of the post box, over 150 to 200 letters were sent by anonymous people. People visit the Ongi Postbox to write about their worries. . (Photo courtesy of Cho) “I didn’t know that there were going to be such a lot of letters, and that is why I came to decide more people were needed to reply them. There were no special requirements or even an interview. The most important thing was sincerity which people who applied to become clerks already possessed,” Cho said. As the manager of ongi general store, he spends his time discussing the management of Ongi General Store with other managers every day, and writing letters with his clerks in a café near Iwha Womans University on Monday, Tuesday, Friday. Each day, with a team of 15 clerks composed of different age group, they read, choose the person who is most relatable with the stories of the letters, and then reply their letters for two hours. As for the expenses for operating the postbox, such as the costs of stamps, letter papers, and envelopes, Cho provides through private tutoring. "The most difficult letters to reply were from children who felt that they were too fat and ugly. To the former letter, I wrote that time will solve the problem. To the latter, I replied that she would find other charms as she grows. I spend a lot of time and be careful with what I'm saying when I sending letters to children." (Photo courtesy of Cho) The importance of the freedom of choice in life According to Cho, he puts a lot of value in helping people, continuously participating in volunteering, such as helping prepare events for patients with Lou Gehrig’s disease. His belief was set after his grandmother’s death. “I was very close to my grandmother because she took care of me when I was young. When she was diagnosed with lung cancer and met her death, I thought a lot about how human life is so limited and how we will benefit from helping each other instead of having meaninglessly competitions, ” Cho reminisced. “My current plan is to increase the number of the postbox, and set up a booth complete with two writing tables as an extension of the postbox. I want people to be more comfortable and thus have more time to write out their worries. I’m preparing a crowdfunding for the project now. Then, I wish that Ongi General Store can develop into a non-profit organization to help comfort more people,” Cho said. "I believe in the value of helping people." (Photo courtesy of Cho) According to Cho, consistent reading and the experiences from his life help sympathize with the letters. "I was a very diligent student before I decided to take a leave of absence. I began to feel skeptical of dull, mindless studying although everybody else believes it is the right answer of life," he said. After he took a leave of absence, he tried running a street vendor, worked in a social enterprise, and went on traveling. He felt that there is no right answer but to live one’s own life. “If I write a letter to my past self, I want to tell myself that although I once worried a lot, all the difficult things turned out to help me instead. Nobody else lives for you, and the one who feel happiness from your life is yourself. So try what you truly want to do without regret or worries, ” Cho smiled. Cho's effort to spread warmth through heartfelt concerns about others' worries shines like sunlight. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-03 27

[Student]Touring Around Hanyang With 'Tambang Tambang'

Nowadays, with the official launch of Pokémon Go in Korea, augmented reality games have become more familiar to people. ‘Tambang Tambang’ (tambang being a Korean word, meaning 'explore') is an augmented reality game which leads users to tour around the Hanyang campus while completing missions. The application was released on March 15th this year. Tambang Tambang was created by four students: its founder and leader Shin Kang-soo (Department of Policy Studies, 3rd year) and three members, Noh Ung-gi (Department of Sports Industry, 3rd year), Kim Na-yeun (Department of Applied Art Education, 4th year), and Yoo Eun-seo (Department of Applied Art Education, 4th year). Shin and No spoke about the stories behind Tambang Tambang. Let’s go tambang in HYU Playing Tambang Tambang is fairly easy, which makes it greatly accessible. One simply has to take a photo of a required sculpture or an object suggested in silhouette to pass each course. Once one completes a mission, he or she will be allowed to continue onto the next destination within the game. A major characteristic of the game lies in its feature that allows users to gain further information about an object or a specific place while playing the game, visiting the actual spot at the same time. The picture shows the future game display model. Displayed on the left is the overall map, and the mission page is shown on the right. (Photo courtesy of Tambang Tambang) The initiative model of Tambang Tambang is currently based on the HYU Seoul Campus. “As there are hundreds of high school or middle school students visiting HYU, we thought it could be hard for them to tour around the campus more effectively without a proper guide,” said Shin. Tambang Tambang aims to target those students, as playing the game will naturally lead them to learn about the campus as well. Currently, as one of the main way to advertise the game, they have collaborated with Saranghandae, the school's student ambassador group. “We designed the courses along with Saranghandae, the courses will include the school’s important spots like the Lion’s Rumble, Paiknam Library, and 88-stairs. The game will be later used in the campus tour program by Saranghandae,” said Noh. From assignment to business Four students with different majors first met one another through a lecture called ‘Social Entrepreneurship’, where students were expected to build and plan their own social business. “Our final assignment was to present our whole plan in front of the professor and the director of HYU social innovation center, Seo Jin-seok. After the presentation, Shin and his members received a suggestion from the director to make their project as an application. “I was really excited to be given the opportunity to proceed with the project. It wasn’t the first time that I had participated in a start-up business, but it was new for me to be the founder while leading the whole team,” explained Shin. Noh (left) and Shin (right) said that the release of Tambang Tambang was only possible because of every members' effort. For Shin and the members, making proper content, like the campus trajectories, and developing an application based on that was surely arduous work. “We had to spend hours actually visiting places we hadn't actually had a chance to visit. We got help from an existing walking course called Doollehgil, HYU’s campus trails that encompasses the campus’s 8 scenic points,” said Noh. Through enough research and incorporation of recommendations they received from their fellow students, Shin and his team were soon able to discover more spots worth taking note of. Making the overall contents of the game was the job of Shin and Noh. Designing was taken on by Kim and Yoo, who are capable of dealing with related computer programs. With financial support from HYU Social Innovation Center, they are currently being helped out with other technical problems through outsourcing. Shin shows how to complete a mission on Tambang Tambang. Learning through playing Currently, Shin and Noh said the number of downloads for Tambang Tambang stands at about 200. Of course, they aren't fully satisfied with the results, which is why they have been planning on creating bigger business models to upgrade Tambang Tambang. “We thought of creating Tambang Tambang as part of another game to introduce museums that exhibits materials regarding history, especially Korean history,” said Shin. Just like how Tambang Tambang can be played on HYU's Seoul Campus, the new version will work as a medium between museums and visitors. “We found out that the current methods of learning Korean history contributes negatively to its understanding among teenagers. There are various reasons for that, but the most critical one is that it usually fails to retain students’ attention as the subject itself is oriented towards memorizing,” said Shin. Tambang Tambang aims to increase students' interest in Korean history by making the learning process more entertaining. Certainly, there is still a long way for Shin and his team to go. “Three months was definitely not enough time for us to complete all the necessary work. We'll have to upgrade the game on many different aspects such as its music and effects,” mentioned Noh. “In the near future, we hope to become successful enough to support students who are living far away from Seoul to give them a chance to come to HYU,” said Shin and Noh. Tambang Tambang will be developed continuously in tandem with the team's higher goals. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-02 08

[Student]Piano Genius Reintroduced as Band Leader

If you've seen K-Pop Star 2, a Korean music audition TV program for singers and dancers, you will remember a girl who was a so-called piano genius, Choi Ye-geun (Department of Applied Music, ERICA Campus, 3rd year). As a high school student, Choi amazed producers of the biggest Korean entertainment companies with her astounding musical talent, especially with her deep, soulful voice and hard-to-believe song arrangement abilities. After the audition, Choi decided to transfer to an arts high school to focus on her music career. Now, as a Hanyang University (HYU) student, Choi is living both as a band musician and a hardworking Hanyangian. The band’s first single, ‘Adult’ Choi's recent single, 'Adult'. (Photo courtesy of Reve Entertainment) While Choi’s steps following the audition were highly anticipated by a lot of her fans, she embarked on a new challenge, which was introducing a song with a band session. On January 2nd this year, Choi released the single ‘Adult’ in the name of 'Choi Ye-geun Band'. It has received positive reviews from the public. Her fans have commented how Choi's singing is improving by the years. Choi sings the song with her powerful and soulful voice. The song 'Adult' is about a man, whom she has a crush on, being more mature and calm than the singer herself, who is contrastingly impatient because of her unrequited love. “I'd had a crush on someone when I was in middle school. He was older than me as the title of the song implies, but the memory was only a motive for the song. Theest of the lyrics are all based on my own imagination,” said Choi. Before singing in a band, Choi in fact released several digital single albums as a solo artist. “I produced various songs as digital singles as I wanted to try out different genres of music. I didn’t know what kind of music suited me best at the time,” explained Choi. Choi met one current band member from one of her concerts. “When I was performing in different places, I met a senior from HYU, who is now a proud member of my band. He had asked if I’d want to perform in a band with him and his session, and I'd had no reason to hesitate. It just seemed fun enough to try.” Choi (middle) and her band members. (Photo courtesy of Reve Entertainment) If you love music, you are already a musician “I just loved music since I was very young. I loved playing the piano in my house since my kindergarten days. I once tried taking piano lessons but I quit after a short while. I was so used to playing it the way I wanted,” recalled Choi. Alongside the piano, Choi had also enjoyed singing as a child. “I started going to vocal lessons as a hobby. Participating in K-Pop Star 2 was actually a bet with friends at those lessons. We betted on who would survive the longest in the audition program. For me, it was really just a fun tryout, which allowed me to feel less pressured in the competition,” said Choi. Of course, being on a TV and being presented to the mass public wasn’t solely an experience without hardship. Choi remembered how the competition between its participants got fiercer after every round. “I was able to endure it because of the fellow participants I became friends with. I loved meeting people who had the same passion and interests as me." K-Pop Star 2 remains a precious memory for Choi. One of the reasons why Choi was able to continue on freely, trying out different music genres both as a solo and in a band, was because of the entertainment company she belongs in. “After K-Pop Star 2, I received many calls from different entertainment companies, but I ended up choosing Reve Entertainment as they promised to help me with “music” itself, which was my top priority rather than being an idol or a celebrity. Come to think of it, I think it was one of the best decisions I have ever made." More musical colors to be filled To Choi, her band is like a clean, white paper, where she can draw freely whatever she wants. This upcoming spring, she is planning to release a mini album featuring several songs including ‘Adult’, along with a new title song. “There are no constructive plans regarding my band as yet, but I don’t want to rush anything. The band can only go on when my music is ready. Still, I do have a long-term goal. I want to be a musician that HYU is proud of, just like the other seniors who made the school proud,” concluded Choi. In the upcoming semester, Choi is to focus on her band's soon-to-be-released mini album. Yun Ji Hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-01 24 Important News

[Student]Aspirations of a Prospective Technical Official

A civil servant is one of the most admired jobs in Korea. It is due to the fact that the job involves taking part in researching, making, and assessing national policies. In order to become a Korean civil servant, one has to pass the Civil Service Examination. The exam is notorious for its immense difficulty, with a very high competition rate. There are diverse fields and ranks in the job, and the one Jo took was the official deputy director's post. Of all the test takers hoping to work as a technical official, Jo Min-woong (Division of Mechanical Engineering, 4th year) not only passed the test but attained the highest scores among the examinees of 2016. Jo spoke about his study tactics and his thoughts about being a public official. For the happiness of the public Jo Min-woong (Photo courtesy of Jo) December 13th, 2016 was the day the names of applicants who passed the Civil Service Examination were announced. “I felt relief when I saw that I passed the exam. After that, I realized I was the top among all applicants. That had been my objective, but I couldn’t believe that it actually came true,” Jo remarked. “Even though I’m not perfect, it’s a great honor to receive such good results. Now, as a future civil servant, I want to try to contribute all I can for the development of Korea." Jo wished to become a public official because he wanted to contribute to increasing people’s happiness. “I did some volunteering- teaching high school students, repairing houses, and carrying coal briquettes for the needy,“ said Jo. One special experience of his was when he helped distribute free lunches to the poor on Christmas Day. Seeing 2,000 people waiting for their lunches on the cold roadside, Jo became determined to become a government official who could enlarge happiness for the public by developing policies that could greatly benefit them. Another reason why Jo wanted to become a technical civil servant was because of the dream that he could devote to Korea’s adjustment in the change related to the 4th Industrial Revolution, characterized by AI (Artificial Intelligence), Big Data, and IoT (Internet of Things). “Like Korea did in the 3rd Industrial Revolution, reaching 10th place in the world economy, I believe that contributing to Korea’s adaptation to this new paradigm is what I want to endeavor for in developing my nation." Effort not in vain There are three stages in the Civil Service Examination. The first stage of the examination is called PSAT (Public Service Aptitude Test), which assesses whether the test taker has the basic ability and refinement of carrying out government affairs. PSAT comprises of subjects called language and logic, data analysis, and situational judgment. The second stage tests how well one is equipped with knowledge of one's major. There are three compulsory subjects and one elective subject, depending on the field that one applied for. The test is held for five days, one subject each day, and applicants are to write their answers in essay format. The final stage is the interview. Held for two days, the test comprises of PT (Presentation), GD (Group Discussion) and an individual interview on public service values and job competence. “I began studying for the test since my sophomore year. I took a leave of absence to concentrate on studying in 2015, one year before the test.” The most difficult time Jo went through was when he failed the first stage of the examination in 2015. However, due to much encouragement from his family and friends, Jo could settle himself down to study once again. “I tried to use all my time to study, except the time taken to maintain elementary needs, such as eating and sleeping. The episode I remember most during the time I spent studying is last year’s seollal, or the Lunar New Year. Instead of going home to see my relatives, I had to stay in my empty dorm alone to study. Eating instant food from the microwave oven, I vowed to pass the exam in 2016 and have rice-cake soup with my family,” Jo reminisced. The folders of papers Jo organized while studying. (Photo courtesy of Jo) “I will receive training from May to December this year. Next year, I am to be placed in a department and start working. I don’t know where I’m going to work yet, but I want to work in the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy because it is the department where officials handle the real economy." When asked to give advice to fellow students who are preparing for big national tests, Jo said, “There is a saying that goes: ’Move forward step by step. There’s no greater method than this in order to accomplish something.' There were times when I felt anxious because I had a lot of studying to do in a limited space of time. In those moments, I tried to repeat this message over and over in my head. I hope this message helps fellow Hanyangians as it did for me in times of distress.” Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr