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2018-03 19

[Student]Proud Achievements as a Foreigner

On the 1st of February, certificates were given to those on the Dean’s List of Research Records, in the HIT Building. Run by the Industry-University Cooperation Foundation, the research results of graduate school students from January to December were reviewed. Awards were given in three different categories to 12 students in total. Out of these outstanding performers, an international student stood out. Successful research achieved in another country Xing Jiuqiang (Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Engineering, Integrated Master’s – Doctor’s Program) was a proud Chinese Hanyangian on the Dean’s list, as an outstanding researcher. Hanyang University (HYU) is constantly helping and supporting students to make the best research results as the future leaders of the world, as creative and talented people are required in this fourth industrial revolution era. Out of the many graduate students working and researching day and night, Xing proudly put his name on the list. Xing proudly put his name on the Dean's list. “I am so honored to receive this award, even though I went through such hardships as an international student in HYU,” started off Xing. 2018 is his sixth year in Korea, away from his home country. “I’m still not fluent in Korean and still working in my research. I am very thankful I received such a meaningful award even though I am still working on my research,” said Xing. Xing researched the biological purification of underwater pollutive chemicals using microalgae. As this is his 5th year since 2014, he has continued on his research in great depth. His professor, Jeon Byong-hun (Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Engineering), led him to try and study in a range of areas, eventually leading to Xing’s success. “I not only concentrated on chemicals, but also researched on wastewater and other pollutive substances. There are also various types of algae, which gives more chances of different results,” explained Xing. Life of an international student The life of a Chinese student in Korea was tough with a high language barrier. Xing started learning Korean in a language school in Korea, from the very beginning. “I couldn’t even order a single menu item in the cafeteria at first. I had so many difficulties to solve the basic things I needed in life,” reminisced Xing. In an unfamiliar land with an unfamiliar language, he was able to meet a reassuring mentor, Professor Jeon. “I call him my father. He was such a big help to me,” commented Xing. A picture of Xing with his lab members. (Photo courtesy of Xing) Xing started his career in the Bioenergy and Environmental Remediation Laboratory since March of 2014, following Professor Jeon. The professor came as a great help to Xing both emotionally and academically. “Even in my research, there were a lot of things I wouldn’t even have thought of if it weren't for Professor Jeon,” reminisced Xing. Xing’s life is still tough, both as a foreigner and a as graduate school student. “I come to school around 10 in the morning and go back home late at night. I used to be extremely frustrated due to the fallacies in my research. Now, I’m enjoying every single moment,” said Xing. Graduate school research isn’t something everyone can do. Therefore, even for Xing, endless trials and errors were required to proceed with his research. He had to spend weeks to deduct a result he wished. Xing commented that he is now familiar with his work and is enjoying it. Xing is planning to continue on with his research. He still has a lot to do in front of him. “I want to continue my career in molecular organisms. I want to go back to China as a great researcher,” said Xing. His dream motivated him to carry on. He, as an international student in Korea, will again try his best to achieve the best he can. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myeong

2018-02 04

[Student]Finding Companions in What They Love

Countless Hanyangians are holding on to unique hobbies and interests along with their studies with passion. Some, with this passion, have recruited other Hanyangians with the same interests and have formed unique gatherings, which are differentiated from the preexisting school clubs in the sense that they are less formal and do not require the school’s recognition. News H met with three of these gatherings: HyES, Han-tteok and Hy-beer. Who wants to play games with me? “I actually tried to start this gathering back in 2014 with my passion towards games. I just didn’t have enough executive abilities back then,” Lee Yee-seok started off (Materials Science and Engineering, 3rd grade). However, as he came back from the army, he decided to do it promptly. HYES (formerly known as Ganking, now as Hanyang E-Sports) is a now-newly-starting gathering for people who like and want to learn various games. Already having executives and over 70 members, students are more than passionate. People are already having sudden online get-togethers through ‘League of Legends’, ‘Battle Ground’, and ‘Overwatch’. The students who aren’t so good at games try even harder since they believe that it’s a great chance to improve their skills. Lee still has a lot of dreams he wants to achieve. Lee has the big picture in front of him. He is planning on a competition within the gathering and with other school students. However, solely playing games is not what his is wishing for. “I want to motivate our members to try different games and give constructive feedback to them. Moreover, I want to produce various youtube content with all of our members’ participation,” said Lee. He mentioned he wants to change the misconceptions of students playing games. “We could create a channel on youtube or facebook, so that other people could also be interested in playing games. I’m sure playing games can be very productive,” said Lee. He also mentioned that he would like more students who are willing to play games, as he enjoys teaching his knowledge to others. “I am working on changing the prejudice on gaming. Passion is the only trait required!” Having a tteokbokki mate “I went on a two-month trip to Europe during my summer vacation, and that became a crucial motivation for me to create this gathering,” said Kwon Yi-kyong (Clothing and Textiles, 3rd grade). As she hadn’t been able to eat a lot of Korean food during her stay in Europe, she had tteokbokki (spicy stir-fried rice cake) every day for two weeks after she came back to Korea. “My parents ate tteokbokki with me at first, but they gave up as that was all I was eating for two weeks,” laughed Kwon. However, as she tried to eat tteokbokki alone, she couldn’t eat all of the fried dishes and sundae (Korean stuffed sausage) on her own. Since she felt the need to have a tteokbokki mate, she created a gathering starting with 40 people with the name of ‘Han-tteok’ Han-tteok met once every other week officially, but they had sudden get-togethers very often. “After a semester starts, it’s a great chance to make new friends and eat what they want at the same time!” said Kwon. Currently with around 80 students only within four months, Kwon introduced their unique MT as well. “We went to an MT right after the semester ended. We made four groups to make the best tteokbokki in an hour,” reminisced Kwon. "I find our members whenever I go to eat tteokbokki." She is still working on the management of this gathering. “We don’t have an official activity yet, so we’re having hardships getting to know everyone. I’m planning on making one in the near future,” commented Kwon. She is also thinking of selling tteokbokki in the school festival to better advertise their gathering. “All Hanyangians, including all international students, are welcome anytime!” Beer, there’s more than you think! When people hear the word beer, they tend to only think of it as ‘fried chicken’s best friend.’ However, there is much more you have to know about beer. Lim Sung-ju (Education, 3rd grade), with great interest towards the information of beer, started a gathering named ‘Hy-beer.’ “I actually visited Europe to learn more about beer. I first started meeting up with a couple of friends to visit pubs,” reminisced Lim. However, through coming across various clubs in other schools related to alcohol drinks, Lim decided to start one himself. Starting from the second semester of last year, Hy-beer gave me the chance to learn about different types of beer with any willing Hanyangians. Lim started with a humble mind, thinking about a lot of people who wouldn’t be interested in beer. However, 40 students applied and Lim had to make a sorrowful decision of only recruiting 20 members for better management. One week, he would buy various types of beers and open a small tasting event. The next week, they would visit a fine pub and gradually find their taste between the various types of beer. Through the repetition of these two weeks, Lim found this activity worthwhile. “As we first started this gathering, a lot of the members asked me for recommendations when we visited a pub. As they experienced various beers, they seem like they are finding their own beer,” said Lim. "I like German beer the most. They stick to the basics very well." Lim is now planning on an official recruitment this March. “I am planning to recruit more people then before, so that more people can enjoy these activities,” said Lim. He mentioned that even though he might not know beer like a professional, he is still continuing his studies. “A lot of people have misconceptions on gatherings of alcohol. However, the purpose of this gathering itself is to enjoy the mood, without focusing on the amount of beer. I wish anyone who has interest in beer, even though they can’t drink well, to join our gathering.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-01 01

[Student]Creating a New Package

Another year has passed, and people are starting the year with a new determination. In the midst of these determinations, a student is firmly walking his way towards his goal. Choi Gi-jun (Communication Design, 4th year), focused on package design during his time as a university student and is reaching towards his own star, as a succesful designer. Designing his talent The area of ‘package design’ is not a very familiar field with most people. “Package design includes everything that covers a product of any kind,” began Choi. Package design is a field within design, that includes the practical package of anything; not only the design itself, but also the shape and the materials of the package. The final output can give totally different impressions according to the materials one uses. Package design is a complex task since the design is not the only implementation the designer must consider. They have to firmly consider the practicality as sturdiness is required in consonance with the fragileness of a product, and the ambience of the material also needs to be taken care of depending on the traits of a product. Choi is explaining about the field of package design in a cafe near ERICA campus. With this skill, Choi participated in the Korea Design Exhibition with his novel idea. He designed a travel kit when Zika virus was a hot issue in Korea. “Various international viruses flow into Korea as tourists are increasing day by day. However, simple hygiene kits can actually protect against most of these viruses, and, therefore, I created an idea suited for students like myself,” explained Choi. He designed a hygiene kit which is very affordable, which targets students like him. Through this idea and design, he was able to win the special prize in the student field exhibition. He also participated in the Design Sharing Project, which was a type of talent donation. This project led to a win-win game, linking students with small businesses and city-run organizations. Students are able to learn more about the actual field of their studies, and the organizations can receive help from the students they wouldn’t have been able to receive otherwise. Through this project, Choi redesigned the sesame oil created by the Ansan Senior Club, ‘Premium (Myeong-pum) Oil’. His work resulted in a 204 percentage increase in sales. However, it wasn’t only the organization who took benefit. Choi reminisced, “The design inevitably has to change according to the target of the product. I was able to learn the details of the methods required through this program, leading towards the development of my own skills at the same time.” The design Choi created in the Korean Design Exhibition and the Design Sharing Project (Photo courtesy of Korean Design Exhibition and Ansan Senior Club) Packaging his life beautifully A designing career was not certain until he stepped into university. “I was initially interested in stage design as a high school student. That was the only area I actually experienced, and that was the very reason I wished to major in it,” explained Choi. He first encountered the field of package design through the recommendation of his teacher. He was captivated by the fact that he was able to make a three-dimensional design instead of a two-dimensional design as he had continuously done. However, after his entrance, he had his ups and downs. “I hit a slump as the years passed in university. As we continuously experience and observe various works, the level of our expectations gets higher. However, there is a certain point that my hands cannot satisfy my eyes.” He worked even harder during his slump. He believed the only method to get out of a slump is to practice as much as he can. He showed his works to others to receive feedback and repeated modifications until he was able to materialize his works through his intention. Choi will continue his design career with his enthusiasm. Now his goal is to become a respected designer in the area. He is already in the midst of preparing his portfolio and has his firm interests in mind. “I want to make packages related to food. There are certain organizations I’m interested in. When you see their designs, you can tell if they showed concern in design or not.” He also added that he wishes the treatment for designers could improve as well. “The social recognition for designers is still low in Korea due to the lack of workplaces for designers. I wish this problem could be solved in the near future,” wished Choi. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myeong

2017-11 13

[Student]Giving Motivation to Live

On the 18th to the 20th of October, a symposium was held by The Korean Society for Preventive Medicine. Four teams who passed the preliminary rounds were given a session to present their research in the Grand Hotel in Haeundae, Busan. Five students, Cho Seung-won (Medicine, 2nd year), Moon Seong-geun (Medicine, 2nd year), Lee Woo-yeon (Medicine, 1st year), Jin Yoo-hyeon (Medicine, 1st year) and Shin Ji-sook (Medicine, 1st year), proudly won the third prize in this symposium, with research named ‘Factors Affecting Suicidal Ideation of Univeristy Students: Based on a comparison to Their Non-University-Attending Peers‘. News H met three of these students- Cho, Lee and Jin- in a quiet café, early in the morning, to hear more about their unique experience. Contrary to the graveness of their paper, they brightened up the whole cafe during the interview. Enthusiasm combined in a single paper Almost all of the university students who major in medical science go through a subject named "preventive medicine". In order to study this subject, they use textbooks made by The Korean Society for Preventive Medicine. This society, therefore, holds a symposium every year with a purpose to return their profits to the students. This year, the 70th symposium was held with a theme of ‘From cure to prevention of illness, a paradigm shift of national health promotion fund strategy’. Various university students form teams and submit papers related to the topic, and only four teams receive a chance to present their research on the spot. The team consisting of five Hanyangians received this chance and explained their paper on the suicides of the 20’s, which was an area where a lot of research has been lacking. “We first met each other in a suicide prevention club made for students in Seoul majoring in medical science,” reminisced Cho. They visited mental health centers to help those in need and persistently studied these areas. This gave them the motivation to participate in this symposium together. They were so enthusiastic in their research that they devoted the majority of their vacation into their research. Although Hanyangians majoring in medicine only have three to five weeks of vacation, this team met constantly for two weeks to proceed their research. They studied the factors of the 20’s suicides by analyzing statistics by themselves. As a result of their diligent effort, they could present unique research and also receive a great outcome. Cho gave a great presentation that led to a successful result. (Photo courtesy of Lee) The 20’s suicides: out of the government’s picture Their paper did not have an easy theme to proceed with. There had been a lot of research on the reasons of suicides in various ages groups such as teenagers and the elderly. However, this team found out that there was not enough information on the people who just stepped into the society. The ‘adult’ category defined by the government contained ages from the 20’s to the 40’s, and these Hanyangians felt that this category couldn’t fully explain the reasons for 20’s suicides. Throughout their research, they concentrated on the difference between the people who entered university and the people who didn’t. Even within the same age group, the students were concerned the two parties would have different thoughts as they go through vastly different experiences, such as jobs or personal relationships. They, therefore, analyzed the social survey of the National Statistical Office. “We made an exemption on all of those who had any experience in a university. We, therefore, had four different groups: by their gender and their experience in university,” commented Lee. They came to a conclusion that there was a visible difference between these groups on the ratio of people who had ever thought about suicide. “Females who didn’t go to university ranked the highest percentage for suicidal thinking at 11 percent, while men who went to university ranked the lowest at 3.5 percent,” explained Lee. As proud Hanyangians After their symposium, they are now making a brief plan for their follow-up study. Jin explained, “We are curious if this difference we found had the same traits in the past. This party itself has not been focused on in previous studies, so we are just making an abstract frame.” They, indeed, are busy students studying medicine, but they still find a way out to pursue what they want. “Me and Yoo-hyeon also participate in a book club, and all of us try to attend all seminars associated with preventive medicine. It might look tough, but it’s simply something we do to relieve our academic stress,” chuckled Lee. "We wish the prejudice on mental health clinics could change over time." They seemed confident and enthusiastic in their field of research throughout the whole interview. However, they also had their deep, personal concerns. “As I started this research, I felt uncertain if I could practically represent those facing hardships. Generally, most students in our major live a fortunate life with less economic concerns. We, sometimes, feel the burden that we might not be able to estimate their situations as much. I just want to let other people know that there are still people like us who truly care about them,” commented Cho. These students will continue working for their own goals, and they will succeed in motivating others to live. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-10 23

[Student]Hanyang's Volleyball Player Stepping Up into the Pro Game

The 2017-18 season V League successfully started its first game on October 14th. The Skywalkers, the team of Hyundai Capital, also started off with a victory. In this sky-rocketing team, rookies were selected through a draft on the 25th of September, enjoying their first victory as a professional. Hong Min-gi (Division of Sports and Well-being, 5th year, the ERICA Campus), was selected by the Skywalkers as a center this day and is now living his life as a professional volleyball player. From Hanyang to Skywalkers Most players start their life as a professional through the draft. Seven pro volleyball teams in Korea pick their new team members in order, by placing a player’s name from the board to their own team’s board. Once the players are of age, they can freely participate in the draft according to their own will. “All players are extremely nervous during this process. Most of them look pale since this decides their life as a professional,” reminisced Hong. In this state of tension, Hong was proudly selected in the first round, by the Skywalkers, for his noticeable skills in blocking. He also added, “It still feels like I’m dreaming. My head is full of volleyball 24 hours these days.” Hong explaining his draft day experience Hong, now, stays together in the ‘Castle of Skywalkers’, a base camp in Cheon-an with his team members for training. As a rookie, he had to fit into a whole new environment with new people. “The team generally has a free atmosphere. I did feel afraid of the training before I entered the Skywalkers. However, after personally experiencing it, I realized I am training in a more effective way,” said Hong. It has not been long since the season started, so he explained that he is currently doing his best to blend well into the group. He constantly showed gratitude to his team members who helped him feel comfortable in a new environment. Hong also reminisced about his life in Hanyang University’s volleyball team. Hanyang University has been constantly participating in the universities’ volleyball leagues and is showing fine grades. 16 students participate in the volleyball team, and they practice enthusiastically. “It is definitely an outstanding team. Most players have talent, making the team expect development every day,” explained Hong. However, he also explained about his hardships. Since his major had classes on the ERICA campus, he and other students had to travel to the Seoul campus after classes ended. He remembered, “We had to put extra care into our health since it was a harsh schedule. But it was truly worth it.” Pictures of Hong in Hanyang university and the Skywalkers. (Photo courtesy of Hong) Life of volleyball Hong's volleyball career is comparatively shorter than that of other players. He first started volleyball when he was in high school, even though he initially prepared for a sports major. “I had no interest in my studies, leaving me with no decent choice of universities. My parents, looking at me doing nothing, recommended me to at least find a thing I can do consistently. That’s how I started volleyball.” After he started volleyball, he found not only an interest but also talent in volleyball. He loved practicing volleyball and was fascinated by it. He realized he started it way later than others, and therefore devoted more hours into volleyball. He would come earlier than others, and practice movements he wasn’t good at. His effort eventually did give him a wonderful result. Hong’s life, however, wasn’t all that ideal. To sports players, their body condition is crucial. Especially when a lot of jumping is required, the cruciate ligaments of a knee plays an important role. During a match in university, his cruciate ligament was ruptured when he bumped into another player. Moreover, this fact did not cause a major problem. Hong reminisced, “I was too arrogant with my body when I wasn’t supposed to. My body recovered better than others, so I ignored the precautions and continued playing games.” His cruciate ligament therefore ruptured again in the same year and came to a point when the doctor suggested him to quit volleyball. “I deeply thought about what I can truly enjoy other than volleyball that whole day. However, I came to a conclusion there is nothing other than volleyball that makes me happy and enthusiastic. The next day, I told my mother in earnest I would give it one last try.” This incident became a turning point to Hong. He also explained the fears that came along with an injury. “It’s not the injury itself that’s most threatening. It’s not the fact you can’t perform as well. The most threatening part is that you start making an excuse for why you shouldn’t try your best. You start self-justifying yourself and that’s actually the very problem a lot of the players quit after their injuries.” After he overcame his injuries, he is now back up again showing what he has. When asked for his happiest moment in his volleyball life, he didn’t pick a particular incident. “I am happy every single moment I play volleyball. I now have a job of what I like the most. Why should I have a particular moment?” smiled Hong. "I love every moment I play volleyball." Now, as a professional volleyball player, he is planning to do his best again in his status. “Most volleyball players wish to become a member of the national team, and that’s my final dream as well. It’s definitely not easy, but I want to be able to play games with the Taegeuk mark on my chest,” wished Hong. As he explained that volleyball is not a game that is decided by the individual abilities, he elucidated, "it is a sport with the power of unity that is the most emphasized since players have to sacrifice themselves for a better attack." He promised, “As a rookie, I want to show my liveliness and passion for the Skywalkers. I wish to be a player who can excel while fitting well into the team.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park young-min