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12/11/2019 HYU News > Academics > 배포용

Title

Kim Chul-geun, professor of Life Science, discovers new anticancer drugs

Published in 「Science Advances」 on November 20

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▲ Professor Kim Chul-geun

Kim Cheol-geun, a professor of Life Science at Hanyang University, recently developed a new approach to discover binding drugs in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Region (IDPR), according to Hanyang University on November 27. It can be used to develop new anticancer drugs that can suppress cancer metastasis. This research has a significant impact in curing cancer since cancer patients have a high mortality rate from metastatic cancer than primary cancer. 

The nonstructural regions of a protein function in vivo through interactions with other proteins. Particularly, since cancer cells have many proteins with the non-structural region, it has been a focal point as a drug target when developing new drugs. However, since the nonstructural protein region does not have a standardized three-dimensional structure, it has been difficult to apply the structural-based drug discovery method1).

Professor Kim's team successfully discovered the new drug by focusing on the 'Disorder to Order Transition' (DOT)2)’ property of the nonstructural protein region and established a computer simulation platform that predicts and analyzes the cancer metastasis protein MBD2. 

Kim's findings have significant implications for the development of new drugs that target transcription factors and epigenetics that are involved in gene expression control. It also makes sense for the first time to demonstrate and demonstrate that MBD2-mediated chromatin remodeling complexes may be useful target systems in the development of cancer metastasis inhibitors.

Professor Kim said, "The substances discovered in this research do not show side effects on normal cells, so they are expected to be applicable to clinical trials as cancer metastasis control agents. He also added, "If so, it could be used for research on the development of various diseases besides cancer.”

The research was supported by the National Research Foundation's support for mid-sized researchers and the Ministry of Science and ICT's Bio and Medical Technology Development Project. It was published in Science Advances, a sister magazine of Science on November 20.

This research has done by co-first authors, Dr. Kim Min-young, Life Science professor at Hanyang University (current postdoctoral researcher, University of Florida, USA) and Dr. Na In-seong, a professor at University of South Florida (current postdoctoral researcher, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA). Also, professor Won Hyeong-sik (Biomedical Science and Engineering, Konkuk University) and professor Vladimir Ubersky (University of South Florida) participated as corresponding authors. 

1) a technology to reasonably design binding drug based on the standardized structure of the target protein
2) It might have a standardized structure when combined with other proteins


Global News Team
Translated by Hyejeong Park
global@hanyang.ac.kr
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