Total 25Articles
News list
Content Forum List
2020-03 26

[Academics]Hanyang University Professor Kim Jong-Ho, Developed a Nanocatalyst that Enhances the Performance of Metal-Air Batteries

Professor Kim Jong-ho Hanyang University announced on March 26th that Professor Kim Jong-ho's team in the Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering of Hanyang University ERICA campus has developed a new nanocatalyst that enhances the performance of metal-air batteries. A "metal-air battery" is a next-generation battery that is charged and discharged through oxygen in the air, which has bigger energy storage, a lower price, and no possibility of explosion compared to the Lithium-ion batteries, and therefore is attracting the attention of the electric vehicle industry. The performance of a metal-air battery that can be charged and discharged is determined by the oxygen's oxidation and deoxidation rate of reaction happening within the cathode. Up until now, expensive catalysts such as platinum (Pt) and ruthenium (Ru) have been used to catalyze the oxidation and deoxidation of the oxygen. However, these catalysts had the problem of reducing the lifespan of the battery, due to its high price and low stability. For this reason, the need for a carbon catalyst with a low price and great performance has been understood. Professor Kim's team coined the "Solvothermal Radical Synthesis," solving the problem through delicately adjusting the nanostructure and vitality of the carbon catalyst. Professor Kim's team attached cobalt atoms or cobalt nanoparticles to porous carbon nanostructures, in order to adjust the interaction between organic-inorganic molecules and precisely control the structure and vitality of the catalyst, thereby enhancing the performance and stability of the catalysts. The metal-air battery produced through the use of this carbon-nanocatalyst has a 30% lower price than the original catalyst, which maintains its stabilized performance above 100%, even after its long charging and discharging. Professor Kim mentioned that "when the carbon-nanocatalyst with a cheap price and high performance is applied to metal-air batteries, it will remarkably reduce the unit cost of electric vehicles," and added, "This research provides a new method to develop a next-generation nanocatalyst material with precisely adjusted structure and performance through molecular controlling." This research was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea and was conducted with Professor Lee Sang-uck's team from Hanyang University ERICA Departement of Chemical and Molecular Engineering, and the result of the research (Paper Title: Molecular engineering of nanostructures and activities on bifunctional oxygen electrocatalysts for Zinc-air batteries) that was published online on one of the top internationally renowned academic journals within the field of chemical and environmental engineering, Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, on March 9th. ▲ Synthesis of carbon-based nanocatalyst through effective molecule control <Reference> Related paper: 2020_3_Molecular engineering of nanostructures and activities on bifunctional oxygen electrocatalysts for Zinc-air batteries 『Applied Catalysis B: Environmental』 Global News Team Translated by: Lee Wonyoung global@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-03 09

[Academics]Professor Shin Hyun-goo Publishes a Research Paper on ‘Targeted Temperature Management for Post-Cardiac Arrest Patients’

▲ Professor Shin Hyun-goo Professor Shin Hyun-goo, and his team of professors from the Hanyang University Hospital, Guri branch, stated that they have successfully published a paper on targeted temperature management for post-cardiac arrest patients on the March edition of the ‘Resuscitation’ journal on March 4th. The research results were published under the title, “Efficacy of the cooling method for targeted temperature management in post-cardiac arrest patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis,” and his studies suggested that when implementing targeted temperature management treatment for patients who successfully recovered from a spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest, the body surface cooling method and the blood vessel cooling method did not show much difference between the survival rate of the patients and other positive neurological outcomes. Professor Shin stated that, “It is still difficult to decide which method is superior when trying to undergo targeted temperature management, whether it is the body surface cooling method, or the blood vessel cooling method,” and that “the proper method must be chosen according to the patient’s medical conditions, and what is financially efficient for him/her.” He also added that there is a “need to an additional randomized controlled study in a large scale.” Meanwhile, Professor Shin Hyun-goo graduated from Hanyang University’s College of Medicine, and also received his doctoral degree from the same university. He is currently working as an assistant professor at the Department of Emergency Medicine in Hanyang University Hospital, Guri Branch. He is currently active in the medical field as a member of The Korean Society of Emergency Medicine and the Korean Council of EMS Physicians, is also an advanced cardiac life support instructor at the American Heart Association, an advanced resuscitation instructor of Korea at the Korean Association of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitations and a specialized instructor for trauma treatment in Korea. Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-03 02

[Academics]Professor Jang Jae-young Developed Thermoelectric Material with Possible Use for Energy Source for Wearable Electronics

Hanyang University Professor Jang Jae-young (36·Photo) of the Department of Energy Engineering and his team recently developed a stretchable organic thermoelectric material that has a self-healable characteristic. Thermoelectric material is a material that converts heat energy into electric energy using temperature difference, that has been so far using materials based on metal or ceramics. When the research outcome created by Professor Jang's team is commercialized, which was introduced on the cover of Advanced Functional Materials, one of the world's most renowned papers on materials academics, it will allow the wearable electronics to recharge the battery by only using the body temperature, expecting a great increase in its hours of usage. Professor Jang Jae-young Professor Jeong Yong-jin There have been active researches being done on high polymer-based thermoelectric materials, which has better flexibility than metal-based materials with difficulties on modifications. However, due to the drawback that an organic material with a soft property of matter can easily lose the characteristic of thermoelectricity when under a physical collision, researchers were having a hard time commercializing the results. Accordingly, to utilize the source throughout a wider area than the energy source of wearable devices, the need for the development of new organic thermoelement was raised, which has flexibility, elasticity and also can self-heal the cracks created through outside impacts. To solve this problem, Professor Jang's research team used functional organic material and provided material design and manufacturing process strategy at the same time, leading to the development of a material showing the best thermoelectricity. The team went through successful doping of conjugated polymer in a form of nano-wire and showed its thermoelectrical characteristic, while also embedding this to thermoplastic elastomer matrix and developing a thermoelectricity material with both a complex form of elasticity and self-healable characteristics. The developed material features great thermal conversion property on low-temperature and small temperature differences, keeping its stable self-healable ability throughout outside impacts such as scratches or cracks. The significance of the research lies in the fact that it has confirmed the possibility of utilization of organic high polymer-based thermoelectricity material as an energy source of wearable devices. Professor Jang mentioned that "this thermoelectricity material will be a great help to the development and commercialization of future electric materials such as electric skin and wearable smart devices," he also added, "the specific technology is also expected to be used throughout the next-generation energy harvesting related field." The research was conducted under the Ministry of Education(Basic Research Support Program-SGER) with support from the National Research Foundation of Korea, co-working with Professor Jeong Yong-jin of Korea National University of Transporation, School of Chemical and Materials Engineering. ▲ Result of self-healable and stretchable organic thermoelectric materials developed by Professor Jang Jae-young's team ▲ Cover of the world renowned paper on materials academics, Advanced Functional Materials <References> ■ Thesis Title: Self-Healable and Stretchable Organic Thermoelectric Materials: Electrically Percolated Polymer Nanowires Embedded in Thermoplastic Elastomer Matrix ■ Writer Information: Professor Jeong Yong-jin (1st writer, School of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Korea National University of Transportation), Jung Jae-min Doctor Candidate (Hanyang University), Suh Eui-hyun Doctor Candidate (Hanyang University), Doctor Yun Dong-jin (Samsung Advanced Institue of Technology), Oh Jong-gyu Doctor Candidate (Hanyang University), Professor Jang Jae-young (Communications Writer, Hanyang University) Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-02 07

[Academics]Professor Jeong Jae-gyeong Develops a Stretchable Display

On the 6th, Hanyang University announced that Professor Jeong Jae-gyeong (Department of Electric Engineering) developed a ‘stretchable transistor’ technology that can be stretched out and easily change the size. Flexible OLED that is used for foldable cell phones, which became famous as ‘foldable smartphones,’ such as the Samsung Galaxy Fold and Huawei Mate X, is expected to evolve ultimately into a stretchable display after developing as foldable and rollable displays. Following such flows, the technology that Professor Jeong’s team developed is foreseen to be largely meaningful in the display field in the future. Commonly, the flexible display uses polyimide as a breadboard so that it can be curved or rolled. However, polyimide has a drawback that it cannot be stretched since it is a hard material. To overcome the limitation, Professor Jeong’s team made a high-performance oxide transistor over polyimide film and used polyethylene that can be stretched like a rubber band as a breadboard, so that it can be stretched threefold than before and can keep its high electric performances. Also, they planned a structure with a higher duration by replacing the previous silica gate insulator with a hybrid polymer of zirconium, organic matter, and a crosslinker. Professor Jeong said, “The hybrid material and semiconductor processing concept can later be applied to rubber breadboard that can be stretched as one wants in the future. Through this, they might be used not only for the display industry but also for various industries such as tablets, clothing, and human skin.” This research is done with the support of Samsung Electronics Research Funding & Incubation Center for Future Technology’s Next Generation Material / Element Project and the Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy’s Element Part Industry Future Growth Basis Project. The research result is published in a world-renowned paper, 「Advanced Functional Materials (IF = 15.6)」 in January. Kim Jeong-o (Department of Information Display Engineering), taking the Ph. D. course joined as the lead author and Professor Hong Yong-taek of Seoul National University joined as a co-author. ■ Title of the Publication: Network structure modification enabled hybrid polymer dielectric film with zirconia for the stretchable transistor application ■ Authors Professor Jeong Jae-gyeong (Corresponding Author, Hanyang University) Kim Jeong-o (First Author, Hanyang University) Hong Yong-taek (Co-author, Seoul National University) ■ Research Principles It developed an oxide transistor array that can have elasticity and can keep high performance by introducing the stress-relief structure that has a different Young’s Modulus. In detail, it synthesized and developed a new hybrid polymer insulator that can keep a good dielectric property by dispersing zirconia ceramics with high permittivity to a high polymer called PVP-co-PMMA in molecular level through the introduction of a crosslink with a silanol group. Through this, it is applied to a high mobility IGTO oxide semiconductor element. With this, it proved a high-performance TFT array concept that is 300% stretchable in a -150℃ process. Global News Team Translation by: Lee Seong-chae global@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-02 06

[Academics]Hanyang University-Ground X, Publicly Opened a Blockchain Master's Course on 'Smart Contract and Decentralized Application' Lecture

Hanyang University and Ground X have announced on the 31st that they are publicly opening full lectures on the 'Smart Contract and Decentralized Application' for free, aiming for the general development of blockchain technology and human resources regarding the field. Last year, Hanyang University made an MOU (Memorandum of Understanding) joint business agreement with Ground X and opened formal master's degree lectures for the development of blockchain education and joint research. Korea's biggest company in the messenger industry, Kakao Corporation, supported the work, having the goal of creating education and joint researches that nurture future blockchain developers. The 'Smart Contract and Decentralized Application' lecture was held for a total of 15 weeks, starting from September of 2019, providing an education covering various contents, such as basic concepts and structure of blockchain, motion fundamentals of Ground X's self-developed platform Klaytn, consensus mechanism, smart contracts and more. Areas such as blockchain application training based on real-life examples, or methods to improve the UI (User Interface)·UX (User Experience) of blockchain services were also covered in the lecture. The lecture was held by the Evangelist Engineer of Ground X, Kim Woo-joong. The lecture is open to any student or developers interested in a blockchain platform and blockchain application development, which can be found at the IT technology education platform 'InfLearn' or 'Ground X Youtube Channel'. Kim Woo-joong Ground X Evangelist mentioned that "it was very memorable to give the lecture that covers not only the basic concepts of blockchain but also the experiences and business knowledge based on various scenarios that happen in the real-life business environment." He also noted that "since the whole Hanyang University lecture is opened online for free, I hope that it helps many people that are interested in Klaytn and development and operation of blockchain application." Logo of Hanyang University and Kakao's blockchain affiliate 'Ground X' Screenshot of the lecture that is open to the public on Youtube Watch lecture video of Ground X (Youtube) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSt0Fu_UtZI&list=PLKqrwxupttYEcJhWAw0E_5RVpDD9LD6Q- Global News Team Translated by: Lee Wonyoung global@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-02 05

[Academics]Increasing Mileage of Electric Cars with a ‘Starch Battery’

On January 21st, a co-research team of Hanyang University's Department of Energy Engineering, Chonnam National University's Department of New Material Engineering, and the KIST Energy Storing Research Group announced that they have developed a silicon-based cathode which has a fourfold battery capacity than the graphite cathode that was previously used and can be charged more than 80% in five minutes. If this is applied to electric cars, the mileage can be increased more than double. Current commercialized electronic car batteries use graphite as cathode material but a disadvantage of it is that its mileage is shorter than internal combustion cars, due to small battery capacity. To develop electric cars with longer mileage, silicon that can save energy up to ten times than graphite is now highlighted as a new cathode material. However, the difficulty of silicon commercialization is that silicon rapid expansion of volume and loss of capacity, when charging and discharging are continued. Also, although many ways to enhance the safety of silicon as a cathode material are suggested, high price and complex processes are hindering silicon from replacing graphite. The co-researching team focused on cheap materials in daily lives such as water, oil, and starch to enhance the stability of silicon. They increased a carbon-silicon material by diluting starch in the water and oil in silicon and heating them. A carbon-silicon complex is made through a heating process just like frying something. Through this, the volume expansion of silicon cathode is prevented, when charging and discharging it. ▲ Carbon-Silicon Complex Synthesis Process Micelle is made of an emulsion of water, oil, starch, and surfactant and when it is repeatedly heated and carbonized, a carbon-silicon complex is formed. (Photo courtesy by KIST) The complex showed a battery capacity (1,530mAh/g) that is four times larger than the previous graphite-based cathode material (360mAh/g), and it also showed a characteristic of stabilized capacity after more than 500 times of charging, and of more than 80% charging in five minutes. This is because the carbon complex controls the volume expansion of silicon so that the stability is increased and it gained a large output due to carbon’s high conductivity and rearrangement of silicon structure. Doctor Jeong Hoon-gi of KIST who led this research showed his expectation by saying, “An easy process and great characteristics as such have a high possibility of commercialization and they will be further used in electric cars and Energy Storing System (ESS) when applied to a lithium-ion secondary battery.” This research was conducted by the support of the Ministry of Science and ICT and as a part of KIST’s main projects and climate change response development projects. The result of the research is published in the newest edition of 「Nano Letters」, an international journal of the field of nanotechnology. ▲ An imaginary image of an electric car equipping a carbon-silicon complex cathode, made by mixing and heating the silicon from eco-friendly materials, such as corn and sweet potatoes, which are mixed with oil (Photo courtesy of KIST) Global News Team Translation by: Lee Seong-chae global@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-02 03

[Academics]Professor Park Hui-Joon, Increased the Solar Battery Efficiency by Combining Compound Semiconductor and Perovskite

On the 19th, the joint research team of Professor Park Hui-Joon of Hanyang University's Department of Organic and Nano Engineering and Professor Lee Jae-Jin of Ajou University announced that they have developed a 'tandem solar cell' by combining a flexible 'Gallium-arsenic (GsAs) compound' and a 'Perovskite semiconductor.' They used the method that increases the conversion efficiency of electronic energy by using more diverse wavelength lights, laminating a semiconductor compound crystal that absorbs large wavelengths of light, over a thin film of Perovskite that absorbs short-wavelength light. The research team succeeded in creating a thin film of Perovskite with high-efficiency, by using a method of low-temperature solution processing. The tandem battery that is made through putting the film over a gallium-arsenic compound is found to have 15% higher efficiency. A possible increase in the price of the tandem solar battery has also been managed by using low-cost Perovskite, which has the function of increasing the photoconversion efficiency of the semiconductor compound. Professor Park mentioned that "the newly developed tandem solar battery is very light and flexible, which makes it useful for automobiles, drones, wearable devices, as well as the energy source for IoT (Internet of Things) sensors." The research has been conducted with the support of the Ministry of Science and ICT, the Ministry of Education, and the Fundamental Research Business by the National Research Foundation of Korea, and the result of the research was published on the cover paper of an international academic journal, 「Advanced Energy Materials」, on December 19th, 2019. Mimetic Diagram of Perovskite-Gallium·Arsenic Tandem Structure Solar Battery (Provided by National Research Foundation of Korea) Global News Team Translated by: Lee Wonyoung global@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-01 14

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Opening a New Method to Save the Environment through Discovering a Nanocatalyst

The Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering is divided into 5 different sub majors, such as Nano Technology, Bio Technology, Information Technology, and Environment & Energy Technology. Overall, it deals with discovering and creating new materials, which are related to various industries throughout the world. Professor Kim Jong-ho, researching at Hanyang University NanoChemistry Lab at ERICA Campus, has recently discovered a method of substance production and functionalization during his research. Professor Kim uncovered a new method to compose a multifunctional nanocatalyst called PdO@WO₃ and the according substance. PdO@WO₃ has never been reported in the academic world and it also serves a perfect role as both a light photocatalyst and an electrocatalyst. ▲ Professor Kim Jong-ho of the Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering of ERICA Campus has recently discovered a method of substance production and functionalization. The material that Professor Kim has discovered is formed through the direct conversion of a PdO nanocluster that has a catalyst function and an ultrathin 2D tungsten oxide (WO₃) nanosheets. This newly found nanosheet serves as a light photocatalyst that converts light energy into chemical energy, while also effectively initiating C-C coupling reactions. PdO@WO₃ can also be used as an electrocatalyst as mentioned above. It is viewed that PdO@WO₃ can be used as a new tool to reduce environmental problems. For example, many medical supplies and medicines such as anticancer drugs go through C-C coupling reactions to be produced. This chain reaction requires a light photocatalyst action of a chemical element called palladium (Pd). The action is usually initiated by mixing palladium into a solution, which makes the material almost impossible to recover after mixing. However, when using the new method created by Professor Kim, the solution becomes a heterogeneous mixture, thus allowing the recovery of the nanomaterial that still maintains the functionality as a catalyst. Palladium is one of the rare-earth materials, known for having a higher price than gold. The ability to use this material again would drop the unit price of the medical supplies and medicines greatly. Moreover, it would also help to improve our natural environment, because the mining of such materials is one of the great factors of environmental destruction. PdO@WO₃ can also be used for creating a next-generation battery to replace the existing lithium-ion battery. The lithium-ion battery has an explosion hazard and low efficiency, which is currently used the most in electronic cars. The demand for the next-generation battery, especially the ones such as the metal-air battery is increasing more than ever. The zinc-air battery that is created through the cathode electrochemical catalyst function of PdO@WO₃ has higher energy density, with no possibility of any explosion hazard. When the zinc-air battery technology becomes commercialized, developing electric cars that can replace cars with an internal combustion engine is expected to become much easier than before. ▲ a) A mimic diagram of C-C coupling reactions conducted using PdO@WO₃ as a light photocatalyst. b) The result of Oxygen Return Reaction conducted using PdO@ WO₃ as the electrocatalyst (Provided by Professor Kim Jong-ho) The discovery of Professor Kim (Thesis title: ‘Ultrathin WO3 Nanosheets Converted from Metallic WS2 Sheets by Spontaneous Formation and Deposition of PdO Nanoclusters for Visible Light-Driven C-C Coupling Reactions') was made possible through the failure of separate research. In the beginning, PdO@WO₃ was simply a byproduct of an experiment with another purpose. However, Professor Kim did not stop after faced with the failure. Instead, he thoroughly analyzed the result and continued various experiments on the newly created material. In the end, Professor Kim redefined the byproduct as a catalyst, after establishing a new method of conversion of the material. Professor Kim stated, “I discovered a new scientific knowledge from the result of an experiment that I thought of as a failure. I also want the students of Hanyang University to not be afraid of the result and to gain new knowledge within it.” The research took a total of two long years; one that ended up with the failed result of the former experiment, the other spent on analyzing and establishing PdO@WO₃. The NanoBio Chemistry Lab of Hanyang University, where Professor Kim's research was done, has continued its studies on creating eco-friendly nanocatalyst material. Professor Kim gained the original patent on the conversion method of PdO@WO₃ and published the work on a scientific journal. He is now considering the publication of how PdO@WO₃ can be applied and used for the metal-air battery. Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-01 08

[Academics]Professor Shin Heung-soo’s Team Has Developed a New Stem Cell Delivery Method Inspired from Lotus

Professor Shin Heung-soo Hanyang University announced on the 7th that a team led by Shin Heung-soo, a professor at the Department of Bio Engineering, recently developed a stem cell delivery technology that can more efficiently treat a wide range of wounds caused by burns as such. Professor Shin developed a method that can produce large quantities of ‘stem cell three-dimensional spheroid’, known to be efficient in treating wounds and deliver them evenly to a wide range of areas. The technology is expected to be widely used to treat patients with extensive area wounds such as burns and ulcers when it can be commercialized in the future. Stem cells are being researched to treat various incurable diseases by injecting it into the human body since they possess functions such as self-replication, differentiation possibility into various cells, growth factors, and immunosuppression factor secretion. However, stem cells had the disadvantage of significant decrease in cell function since the environment around the cell differs from the environment in the body when incubating in vitro system and the limitation that local transmission in the human body is possible in the form of an injection, but it cannot regenerate the tissue in a wide area of damage. Professor Shin’s team derived ideas from lotus and solved these problems. He created a biomaterial that small rooms in hundreds of micrometer-scale, formed on a large scale regularly on the surface, to replicate the structure that each seed is fixed inside lotus seedpod. He formed three-dimensional spheroids by making stem cells extracted from human fat tissues to be brought together. Dealing with the process that the fixed seeds inside lotus become released outside due to external forces, he designed the stem cell spheroids formed in each room to be released externally when biological material expands. As a result of animal model testing, the three-dimensional spheroids produced through this process could be transplanted into a wide-range skin wound easily and showed a cure effect that is improved twofold. Professor Shin said, “This research can increase the survival rate of cells transplanted in the human body by refining the delivery method of stem cell treatment that a lot of people are interested in. It is a meaningful original technology to increase the efficiency of cell treatment with a small number of cells.” This work was researched together with Professor Choi Yu-seok of the University of Western Australia and Professor Moon Seong-hwan of Konkuk University College of Medicine, and the result of the research is listed on the December volume of ‘Biomaterials’, the magazine of authority in the biomaterials field. The research was funded by the Mid-sized Research Support Project and Natural Simulation Innovation Technology Development Project of National Research Foundation, Ministry of Science and ICT. ▲ A biomaterial for the stem cell spheroid delivery and production, based on the lotus-simulated biomaterial. (Left) A mimetic diagram of hydrogel that has a lot of rooms alike lotus, produced with micro-process technology (Middle) A mimetic diagram of stem cell spheroid that has a three-dimensional structure formed in each room through stem cell (Right) A process that spheroid is being delivered through external stimulation for transplantation Global News Team Translated by: Lee Seong-chae global@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-12 11

[Academics]Kim Chul-geun, professor of Life Science, discovers new anticancer drugs

▲ Professor Kim Chul-geun Kim Cheol-geun, a professor of Life Science at Hanyang University, recently developed a new approach to discover binding drugs in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Region (IDPR), according to Hanyang University on November 27. It can be used to develop new anticancer drugs that can suppress cancer metastasis. This research has a significant impact in curing cancer since cancer patients have a high mortality rate from metastatic cancer than primary cancer. The nonstructural regions of a protein function in vivo through interactions with other proteins. Particularly, since cancer cells have many proteins with the non-structural region, it has been a focal point as a drug target when developing new drugs. However, since the nonstructural protein region does not have a standardized three-dimensional structure, it has been difficult to apply the structural-based drug discovery method1). Professor Kim's team successfully discovered the new drug by focusing on the 'Disorder to Order Transition' (DOT)2)’ property of the nonstructural protein region and established a computer simulation platform that predicts and analyzes the cancer metastasis protein MBD2. Kim's findings have significant implications for the development of new drugs that target transcription factors and epigenetics that are involved in gene expression control. It also makes sense for the first time to demonstrate and demonstrate that MBD2-mediated chromatin remodeling complexes may be useful target systems in the development of cancer metastasis inhibitors. Professor Kim said, "The substances discovered in this research do not show side effects on normal cells, so they are expected to be applicable to clinical trials as cancer metastasis control agents. He also added, "If so, it could be used for research on the development of various diseases besides cancer.” The research was supported by the National Research Foundation's support for mid-sized researchers and the Ministry of Science and ICT's Bio and Medical Technology Development Project. It was published in Science Advances, a sister magazine of Science on November 20. This research has done by co-first authors, Dr. Kim Min-young, Life Science professor at Hanyang University (current postdoctoral researcher, University of Florida, USA) and Dr. Na In-seong, a professor at University of South Florida (current postdoctoral researcher, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA). Also, professor Won Hyeong-sik (Biomedical Science and Engineering, Konkuk University) and professor Vladimir Ubersky (University of South Florida) participated as corresponding authors. 1) a technology to reasonably design binding drug based on the standardized structure of the target protein 2) It might have a standardized structure when combined with other proteins Global News Team Translated by Hyejeong Park global@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-12 03

[Academics][Notice] The Medical Research Collaboration Center hosts a special lecture on 'Meta Learner and Auto A.I.'

Hanyang University's Medical Research Collaboration Center will host a third lecture series on the Artificial Intelligence Research Network. The theme is 'Meta Learner and Auto A.I.' The event will be held at 5:30 pm on December 9th at the Lim Woo-sung International Conference Hall, on the 4th floor of the Lecture Hall of the Seoul Campus. The special lecture will be presented by Cho Dong-yeon, a member of T-Brain, SK Telecom's A.I. Center. The lecture will be linked to the Paiknam meeting room at Hanyang University's Guri Hospital. Global News Team Translated by Hyejeong Park global@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-11 13

[Academics][HYU Research] Develops Self-Powered Artificial Muscle

* This article is published in 2019 Hanyang Research Magazine Vol.2 Professor Kim Seon-jeong Develops Self-Powered Artificial Muscle The development of artificial joints or skeletons is highly regarded as a technology for a healthy life, which human nature is longing for. In the midst of this, researches are actively underway to create even muscles, which are one of the largest components in human body, with the artificial technology. In 2017, professor Kim Seon-jeong of Hanyang University, Division of Electrical and Biomedical Engineering and eight teams from three countries have succeeded in developing the world's first artificial muscle energy harvester (regenerating electrical energy from an energy that is thrown away in nature). Professor Kim's research was consecutively selected for Creative Research Initiative Program, supported by Ministry of Science and ICT and National Research Foundation of Korea to foster world-class researchers in 2006 and 2015. As a result, artificial muscles with advanced materials and energy storage devices which stores an electrical energy for driving the artificial muscles have been developed and published four times in Science since 2011. The fifth article is also an extension of the ongoing research on artificial muscles. He further developed a self-powered emergency signal device (product name: Self-Powered Emergency Signal Device), which had the honor of winning the Innovation Award at 2019 CES. Professor Kim said, “From 2006 to 2015, we published numerous papers regarding to the artificial muscles as a Center for BioArtificial Muscle, and we are continuing to conduct research on electrical energy that can move the artificial muscles as a Center for Self-Powered Actuation.” also added that, “The technology of harvesting the electric energy from artificial muscle was selected for one of Korea's top 10 technologies news in 2017.” After 15 years in research, succeeding in developing artificial muscles that are more powerful than human muscles up to 40 times, he is now focusing on an energy that could actuate the artificial muscles. “As human muscles produce energy themselves to contract, artificial muscles need energy to move freely. We are studying yarn-type artificial muscles that can generate electricity while moving on their own on the basis of biomimetic engineering.” said professor Kim to introduce his research activities. According to Kim’s explanation, the generated energy from artificial muscles can not only move artificial muscles, but also replace conventional batteries. Batteries have good performance, however, they have disadvantages of discharging quickly and being useless in extreme environments such as in low temperatures or underwater. However, this yarntype harvester is not affected by these environments and expected to be utilized in various industries. Currently, the research is being conducted with professor Kim Seon-jeong, University of Texas in the United States and University of Wollongong in Australia, and they are recognized as the world’s top group in the fields. "We don’t have many researchers in the group, but they are elite. We want students to have a challenging spirit by presenting them with research interesting subjects,” said professor Kim at the end of the interview. “Teaching by rote has its limitations, so you have to be interested in, passionate and active to be effective,” said Kim to the students. Click to Read Hanyang Research 2019 Vol.2