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2018-02 06

[Alumni]Ekklesia: Under the Sound of Music

In today's competitive society, our lives tend to be labeled as either a failure or a success--two contrasting concepts that one wishes to completely avoid or achieve. But the simple truth that people fail to recognize is that there can be no great success without failure. A model example of this is Kim Jae-bin (Vocal Music, '13), the lead singer of a popera group called Ekklesia. On the rise Holding a long list of stage experience and media exposure, Kim is an active, rising star in the popera field continuously working his way up to success as the leader as well as the CEO of Ekklesia (Ekklesia Enterprise). Now a well-known popera group, it consists of three members including Kim himself. The term “Ekklesia” itself is a Greek word defined as “an assembly under God’s calling." It well incorporates Kim’s dream to perform songs that both singers and the audience can emotionally relate to and return with a bit of peace and happiness. However, it was not always a path full of bliss for Kim to get to where he is today. In particular, back when he first started out as a popera singer, it was one bumpy road that not many wanted to risk taking. “Popera,” also known as operatic pop, is a subgenre of pop music that is performed in an operatic singing style or a song. As it is a more popularized version of classic opera among the public, one would think that it is a positive trend in the classical music industry. However, in the beginning, it was perceived as some sort of heresy and received heavy criticism from the field. Likewise, Kim was also skeptical before taking this path until his life mentor and professor in charge at that time strongly suggested that he try out for a popera group called “UAngel Voice,” which would then provide him with abundant stage experience and financial support. After two years as a ‘Uangel Voice’ member, he did not want to quit as “it allows me to feel the instant connection with the audience as it has more interaction than classical opera performances. This ultimately led me to create Ekklesia," said Kim. UAngel Voice stage rehearsal, 2012 (Photo courtesy of Kim) Walking down the rough path Kim's background story was surprisingly full of rough patches that started out with “I had nothing more to lose as I was starting from scratch. Whatever I challenged myself with, even if there was a huge chance of failing, I knew that there could only be a way up for me.” At one point, Kim even had to work as a salesman in an insurance company to financially support Ekklesia. Despite these hardships, he never refrained from challenging himself to try new things. “I like the term ‘전화위복’ (转祸为福; misfortune turns into a blessing). My years of experience at the insurance company allowed me to truly understand all the hardships these people were going through everyday at work. I then incorporated it in my message to these people through the songs I performed for them. It was quite successful, and I was able to sign long-term contracts with other large companies to perform at their workshops and seminars.” Fear of failure: the only hindrance to reaching your dream For Kim, one of the most meaningful performances was from back when his group gave hour-long performances on stages in the metro stations. "One time, this mother and a child who had been watching our entire performance bought a huge cake and coffee for us. The mother thanked us for our performance and told us that her daughter who actually hated music, insisted that they stay and watch till the end. She had never seen her so happy. This was the moment when it really hit me, that I was doing something meaningful. From then on, my passion for music grew, and I have never hesitated to try something new.” Kim with a mother and her child after performing at Sadang station, 2014 (Photo courtesy of Kim) When asked if he thinks he is now successful, Kim said yes without a doubt. Kim’s definition of success was being able to proudly perform a piece that is not only the collaboration of pop and opera, but a collaboration of everybody’s heart: mix and intercommunication of our dreams and feelings. He added that, right now, he is truly happy only because he knows the starting point of his path – how it was before, his past experiences and so on, and also because he has a lifelong goal. “I hope that my popera successors will dream big but fear less. If we look carefully, there are many stages we can perform on although it may not be as financially rewarding or live up to one’s expectations. Don’t let your fear of failure blind you from all those chances out there and end up only looking for short-cuts to success.” Ekklesia performing "Love" (Video courtesy of Kim) Kim Jae-bin - Le Temps des Cathédrales (Video courtesy of Kim) Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-02 05

[Faculty]Founding the First Korean Dance Troupes Association

There is an old saying on unity, ‘united we stand, divided we fall’. It is important for people to cooperate and organize to raise their voice on issues and deliver their will more effectively. Professor Moon Young-chul, from the Department of Dance, has been a professional ballet dancer for over forty years and has always had the urge to bring dance troupes in Korea together for common goals. Thanks to his hard work, more than fifty organizations from three different fields of dance from – Korean dance, modern dance, and ballet – were able to cut the ribbons on July 13, 2017. Although it was a Saturday, Moon came to school for practice. Voicing out issues One of the many issues that Moon and the Korean Dance Troupes Association (tentative title) are interested in is the military issue of Korean male dancers. As dancing requires daily practice in a specific condition, male dancers in the nation are having a difficult time continuing their career while having to serve in the military for almost two years. There are very limited opportunities for exemption compared to other fields of art such as music. While there are more than 240 awards which are subject for the exemption annually, male dancers must win first prize from one of the four events to be exempt from military duty, which are the Dong-A Dance Competition, Seoul Dance Festival, Korea Dance Festival, and the Korea Newbie Dancer Competition. “Korean dancers are good, but the condition is harsh up to the point where foreign dance companies ‘import’ our dancers” lamented Moon. Moon plans to discuss such issues with the head of other dance troupes and bring them up to the table as much as he can. The association also aims to provide foundations for the member organizations to brand themselves, promoting Korea to the world. Moon’s MoonYoungChul Ballet Pomea contributes a lot in that sense. As well as the media work and teaching, Moon works hard to live up to another title of his, 'a ballet dancer'. (Video courtesy of Moon) Leading creative ballet in Korea MoonYoungChul Ballet Poema was founded in 2003 by Moon when he started teaching in HYU. He brought Hanyang graduates and students together to perform creative ballet, scripts inspired from literature. ‘Poema’ means poet in Spanish. Moon named his organization as such because he believes ballet dancing is like a poet, literary and delicate. The organization performs once a year with original pieces. Moon organized his ballet group aiming to make the creative ballet group that represents the whole nation. In a sense, he has already achieved that goal. The MoonYoungChul Ballet Poema has won dozens of awards in Korea and has been invited to perform in Saint Petersburg, Russia for four years in a row. The most recent performance was titled <The Blue Bird>, from Maurice Maeterlinck’s script <The Blue Bird (1908)>. A video clip from last year, The MoonYoungChul Ballet Poema performing <The Blue Bird> (Video courtesy of Moon) Moon himself occasionally performed in the play although he does not plan to take the stage this year. When asked what motivated him so much from a young age to continue in ballet and constantly strive to dance, produce, and engage in backstage jobs, Moon replied that “ballet is like a drug to me. I just can’t live without it.” With the passion he has inside, he aspires to provide more stage for his students now. “Students need motivation to keep them practicing every day. I feel like it is my duty now to find and give as much opportunity to them,” smiled Moon. Recently appointed as the 17th president of the Dance Research Journal of Korea, Moon will be busier than ever. “Dance and procrastination never go along. The one who keeps working and keeping themselves busy will survive,” emphasized Moon. He wishes his students to participate more in the academic realm of ballet, as its importance is growing day by day. Kim So-yun dash070@naver.com Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-02 04

[Student]Finding Companions in What They Love

Countless Hanyangians are holding on to unique hobbies and interests along with their studies with passion. Some, with this passion, have recruited other Hanyangians with the same interests and have formed unique gatherings, which are differentiated from the preexisting school clubs in the sense that they are less formal and do not require the school’s recognition. News H met with three of these gatherings: HyES, Han-tteok and Hy-beer. Who wants to play games with me? “I actually tried to start this gathering back in 2014 with my passion towards games. I just didn’t have enough executive abilities back then,” Lee Yee-seok started off (Materials Science and Engineering, 3rd grade). However, as he came back from the army, he decided to do it promptly. HYES (formerly known as Ganking, now as Hanyang E-Sports) is a now-newly-starting gathering for people who like and want to learn various games. Already having executives and over 70 members, students are more than passionate. People are already having sudden online get-togethers through ‘League of Legends’, ‘Battle Ground’, and ‘Overwatch’. The students who aren’t so good at games try even harder since they believe that it’s a great chance to improve their skills. Lee still has a lot of dreams he wants to achieve. Lee has the big picture in front of him. He is planning on a competition within the gathering and with other school students. However, solely playing games is not what his is wishing for. “I want to motivate our members to try different games and give constructive feedback to them. Moreover, I want to produce various youtube content with all of our members’ participation,” said Lee. He mentioned he wants to change the misconceptions of students playing games. “We could create a channel on youtube or facebook, so that other people could also be interested in playing games. I’m sure playing games can be very productive,” said Lee. He also mentioned that he would like more students who are willing to play games, as he enjoys teaching his knowledge to others. “I am working on changing the prejudice on gaming. Passion is the only trait required!” Having a tteokbokki mate “I went on a two-month trip to Europe during my summer vacation, and that became a crucial motivation for me to create this gathering,” said Kwon Yi-kyong (Clothing and Textiles, 3rd grade). As she hadn’t been able to eat a lot of Korean food during her stay in Europe, she had tteokbokki (spicy stir-fried rice cake) every day for two weeks after she came back to Korea. “My parents ate tteokbokki with me at first, but they gave up as that was all I was eating for two weeks,” laughed Kwon. However, as she tried to eat tteokbokki alone, she couldn’t eat all of the fried dishes and sundae (Korean stuffed sausage) on her own. Since she felt the need to have a tteokbokki mate, she created a gathering starting with 40 people with the name of ‘Han-tteok’ Han-tteok met once every other week officially, but they had sudden get-togethers very often. “After a semester starts, it’s a great chance to make new friends and eat what they want at the same time!” said Kwon. Currently with around 80 students only within four months, Kwon introduced their unique MT as well. “We went to an MT right after the semester ended. We made four groups to make the best tteokbokki in an hour,” reminisced Kwon. "I find our members whenever I go to eat tteokbokki." She is still working on the management of this gathering. “We don’t have an official activity yet, so we’re having hardships getting to know everyone. I’m planning on making one in the near future,” commented Kwon. She is also thinking of selling tteokbokki in the school festival to better advertise their gathering. “All Hanyangians, including all international students, are welcome anytime!” Beer, there’s more than you think! When people hear the word beer, they tend to only think of it as ‘fried chicken’s best friend.’ However, there is much more you have to know about beer. Lim Sung-ju (Education, 3rd grade), with great interest towards the information of beer, started a gathering named ‘Hy-beer.’ “I actually visited Europe to learn more about beer. I first started meeting up with a couple of friends to visit pubs,” reminisced Lim. However, through coming across various clubs in other schools related to alcohol drinks, Lim decided to start one himself. Starting from the second semester of last year, Hy-beer gave me the chance to learn about different types of beer with any willing Hanyangians. Lim started with a humble mind, thinking about a lot of people who wouldn’t be interested in beer. However, 40 students applied and Lim had to make a sorrowful decision of only recruiting 20 members for better management. One week, he would buy various types of beers and open a small tasting event. The next week, they would visit a fine pub and gradually find their taste between the various types of beer. Through the repetition of these two weeks, Lim found this activity worthwhile. “As we first started this gathering, a lot of the members asked me for recommendations when we visited a pub. As they experienced various beers, they seem like they are finding their own beer,” said Lim. "I like German beer the most. They stick to the basics very well." Lim is now planning on an official recruitment this March. “I am planning to recruit more people then before, so that more people can enjoy these activities,” said Lim. He mentioned that even though he might not know beer like a professional, he is still continuing his studies. “A lot of people have misconceptions on gatherings of alcohol. However, the purpose of this gathering itself is to enjoy the mood, without focusing on the amount of beer. I wish anyone who has interest in beer, even though they can’t drink well, to join our gathering.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-01 21

[Student]Melody of Sincerity

"How will you financially be successful in that path?" was the question Park got most frequently after becoming determined that he would become a harmonicist. Since he was a young boy, Park Jong-seong (Department of String and Wind Instruments majoring in Orchestra Conducting, Master’s program) had many opportunities to encounter music and learn various instruments thanks to his pianist mother. The one that enchanted Park the most was not the piano, the violin, or the flute, but the harmonica. Having studied harmonica and composition since high school, Park became a talented harmonicist player and song-writer who is dreaming of becoming a conductor in the future. The thrill of impressive touchingness Park first encountered the harmonica when he was in elementary school. He only considered the instrument as a good hobby and something he could have fun with, until his harmonica teacher suggested him to participate in a harmonica contest held in Japan. Park agreed to the suggestion and ended up receiving the grand prize, which brought his teacher to tears of happiness. “The teacher is someone who is so precious and valuable to me. He is a great person of wonderful personality who was so loving and dedicating. After receiving the grand prize and seeing him crying, I felt like I repaid for all the love I’ve received from him with music. This is when I decided that I would become a harmonicist.” Moreover, lucky for Park, the contest was also a concert for professional harmonica players, the performance which further inspired him to become a harmonicist. Park saw an old Japanese harmonicist who stepped onto the stage with a walking aid due to his weak legs, his harsh breaths clearly audible during his performance. “The sound that man produced was simply mesmerizing. It was so touching that it even made me feel jealous of his professionality. At that moment, my dream became solidified,” reminisced Park. The thrill that vibrated Park’s heart that day was the pivotal event that set his path toward becoming a harmonicist. "For my song composition, the inspiration comes from my daily life." Nonetheless, his decision was not always unchanging. While in high school, he studied music composition because he thought going to a university and majoring in composition would be the most helpful stepping stone for his dream since there is no school in Korea that has harmonica as a major,. Park realized that the history of harmonica is relatively very short and there are not many songs written for harmonica. Such bitterness urged him to become a composer for harmonica music. Park almost majored in composition in one school had it not been for another school which announced that they accept any applicants of string and wind instruments. Even though majoring in the harmonica was unheard of and unprecedented, his skill allowed Park to become the first one. Park proved his skill by collecting about 10 prizes from various contests. The most memorable one of all was the pivotal contest in Japan and some others include the Asian Pacific Harmonica Contest held in China, in which Park got the first prize in three different sections and the world’s harmonica contest in Germany. Park likes to perform his own songs in the contest because he wants to express himself through the song he composed, which he believes could best convey his color and feeling. The song he feels the strongest attachment is called ‘Run Again,’ which Park composed after his mother passed away. Park was going through a great emotional slump and could not prepare for the contest. However, he suddenly encouraged himself and brushed off the dust. This song won him a grand prize! A clip of Park's performance For myself, and for the harmonica “If I have to choose one thing to do for the rest of my life, I thought it would be the harmonica because it’s what makes me happy.” The instrument is charming to Park in its smoothness in playing. “Just with the breaths I’m taking right now, the harmonica can be played. Unlike other instruments where you have to use energy or some power, the harmonica can be played very naturally.” This is what enables Park to express and convey his emotions through his songs, as the sound comes from his natural breaths. “There is one thing I want to change about the instrument. It is the fixed idea people normally have with the harmonica. Unless they see me performing, people tend to underestimate the sound the instrument can produce. I want to change such a simple understanding about the harmonica by becoming a better player who can produce greater music.” Just as Park wanted to study music composition to compose songs for the harmonica, he wanted to study orchestra because he wants to become a better harmonica player. He was seeking further studies above composition that would guide him to enhance his skills as a player and came across the idea of studying orchestra conducting. After studying conducting at Hanyang with his professor, Park became more ambitious to carry on his studying and move on to the Doctor’s degree. He not only thinks his studying will ultimately help him to become a better player but also found another goal for himself. “I wish to be an orchestra conductor who can also participate in the performance,” envisioned Park. "I will always have fun playing the harmonica and be happy with my performance." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-01 17

[Alumni]Passion to Learn After the War, Landing in America

Hanyang University(HYU) is now in its 79th year of establishment. Throughout these years, countless students have graduated from our school and are shining in their own positions all over the world. Lee Jong-hyeok (Industrial management, ’65) is one of these students, working in America as the representative of Lee Accountancy Group. Last November, Lee made his first visit to HYU since 1965 to receive an honorary graduation certification. An honorary graduation certificate and a development fund After attending HYU as an architecture major for three years since 1958, he passed an exam by the ministry of Education to study abroad. He then voluntarily enlisted himself in the Marine Corps before moving to another country. He changed his major to industrial management after he was discharged from military service, and therefore graduated from HYU as a industrial management major. After almost 60 years, Lee received an honorary graduation certificate of an architecture major last November. As Lee received his honorary graduation certificate, he commented, “I only wandered around the alumni of architecture since I graduated with another major. Now I can proudly call myself an alumnus of architecture to my colleagues.” Lee received an honorary graduation certificate in the office of the president in November, 2017. Lee also made a 40 thousand dollar development fund contract for HYU. 10 thousand dollars is being planned to be donated every year, for four years. He had a special reason he decided to donate this money to HYU. “I received help from the school in various areas and was occasionally exempted from tuition fees. I was the very refugee who moved from Hamgyong province to South Korea immediately after Korea was emancipated from Japan. I therefore decided to donate this money, counting this fund as my tuition fee for four years,” explained Lee. He also conveyed his words that he wishes his money to be spent on students with willpower to pioneer their own path. As a foreigner, as a pioneer With peculiar interest to learn, he not only graduated HYU, but continued on his degrees in America. He has a bachelor’s degree in California Sonoma State University’s School of Business and Economics, a master’s degree in Golden Gate Graduate School Business Administration major and a doctor’s degree in Argosy University Graduate School Business Administration major. He had his reasons for his passion to study. “After I fled for refugee after liberation, I was left alone during the Korean war. I continued my studies alone, to be accepted as a member of the society,” reminisced Lee. He first entered HYU’s architecture department with hopes to set up Seoul again after the Korean war, which ended in 1953. However, after he was discharged from military service, he changed his major with his interest in industrial psychology. Lee therefore continued on his studies in America, to study deeper into industrial psychology. In Sonoma State University School of Business and Economics, he had to study accounting in order to proceed on his major. Although it was then an unfamiliar field, he was captivated by the systematic and organized trait of accountancy. Afterwards, he received a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) in California, and worked as an adjunct professor in various universities such as Armstrong State University, San Francisco State University and East Bay California State University. Lee also worked as an economic consultant in California State Government and Oakland, and is now the representative of Lee Accountancy Group. Lee is now a proud representative of a corporation in America. (Photo courtesy of The Korea Times) The power of determination Oakland led the Thanksgiving Day for the lower-income group and the homeless, with over 2 thousand volunteers each year. However, the state asked Lee to support this event, as various problems occurred when the state led this event. “Due to the lack of budget, I had to ask for help from various corporations, social organizations, my fellow compatriots and the Marine Corps back in Korea. A lot of people lent their hands and gave donations to us. The basketball team, the Golden State Warriors also participated as volunteers and helped us out,” explained Lee. Oakland, therefore, announced ‘The Day of Lee Jong-hyeok’ on the fifth of May, 2004, to thank his contribution to the state. "Race is not important in achieving what you wish to do!" (Photo courtesy of Lee) “Some might say it’s just a lifelong regret of my adolescence. However, I wanted to show that anything is possible once you try it, even in the white society. More frankly, I solely wanted to reach the goal I had set for myself,” answered Lee, to the question of his motivation to achieve such a variety of results. He emphasized the word ‘enthusiasm’ to all Hanyangians during his interview. Lee explained that it’s important to set one’s goal straight and to stick to them. He also emphasized to hold on to self-actualization with a distinct willpower to achieve their goal. “Live hard, love hard, learn hard, and share hard!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-01 15

[Alumni]The New Head Coach of the School Basketball Team Expresses Confidence

Once upon a time, there was a shooting guard on the Hanyang University’s (HYU) basketball team who led the team to win the competition. Twenty-three years later, the player returned to his home team to teach his pupils. This week, News H met the new head coach of HYU's basketball team, Chung Jae-hun (Business, ’96). "I am deeply honored to come back home for teaching." About the coach himself A shooting guard is one of the five positions in a basketball game. He or she is the one who mainly attempts long range shots such as Stephen Curry in the modern NBA. Chung used to play as a shooting guard when he was in college. One of the moments that he remembers playing was his turn around shot against the Korea University team. 1995 was the year when HYU shared the top spot with Korea and Chungang University. After graduation, Chung became the founding member of Daegu Orion Orions, which is now called Goyang Orion Orions. The newly appointed head coach further explained his long passion towards leadership. “The frustration became bigger for me to lose a game as a coach, than to lose as a player,” said Chung. That is why he decided to retire from the court in 2002 after winning the 2001 season with the Orions. Now coming back to his home school as a head coach, Chung is inspired to grow the players as big as the alumnus already on the court. “I feel greatly honored and pressured at the same time,” smiled Chung. Hanyang's proud basketball team from last season. We ended up in 8th place last year. (Photo courtesy of HY-Ball) Prospects for the team Chung sees that the biggest strength of the team is speed. However he also recognizes its weakness which is the lack of height and defense. “We have many offensive options on the team but we lack defensive strategies.” Therefore he is planning to focus on improving the defense by emphasizing the centers to get more involved in boxing out, overcome the physical attributes by engaging in zone defense strategies and attempting to trap the opposition in the corners. Boxing out refers to blocking the opposition players from getting involved in rebounds, which is when the ball bounces back from the rim. Zone defense is when players mark the players according to their own respective areas. “Practice makes perfect,” said the head coach, looking determined. The only way to make up such shortcomings is to practice day and night. In the morning, the team is scheduled for weight lifting, defensive strategies in the afternoon, and personal skill training during the night. As Chung remembers his team back in the days in HYU, most players were able to do shoots, passes, dribbles and drives. Nevertheless, he feels like the students nowadays are less impressive, in terms of their abilities. “Still, by working to improve ourselves little by little, we will be able to have competitiveness through the use of various strategies,” mentioned Chung, with hope in his eyes. "Instead of fancy plays that catch the attention of the crowd, I will defend and rebound more to improve the team," said Bae Kyung-sik (Sports Industry, 4th year), the captain of the team. When asked what his goal is for next season, Chung replied with humbleness: “We aim to make it to the play-offs." A playoff is a competition played after the regular season by the top competitors to determine the league champion or a similar accolade. Once our team makes it to the playoffs, Chung believes that the team can possibly reach the final four. “Me and the whole team shares the goal of reaching the final four. Although people might think that we are not a strong team, we aim high,” Chung aspires. The new season starts from March. Let us keep our eyes on the upcoming games and the progress Chung will bring to the team. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Geun-baik

2018-01 14

[Student]Monopolizing the First Place

With the slogan ‘The Engine of Korea,’ Hanyang University (HYU) has been one of the main forces in Korea for technology and engineering domains. Having high recognition of its engineering department and other fields of technology, Hanyang has been cultivating numerous outstanding students who have the potential of becoming the future leader of the fields. In this year’s Technique Examination where five out of about 250 people are selected, four Hanyangians proudly returned with the glorious news of occupying four of the five winners’ places. News H introduces two of the four Hanyangians this week: Jeon Ui-geon (Architectural Engineering, ’12) and Cho Won-dam (Chemical Engineering, 4th year). Hard work pays off, eventually Five out of 250 sure is a fierce competition with a ruthless passing ratio. Jeon prepared for the test for almost four years and Cho for an year, the rough time of which surely paid off. When asked what is the secret of winning the competition, Jeon and Cho both gave humble yet determined answers. “I think it’s all about setting the right direction. I always tried to have the best mindset of a diligent student. No matter what I was doing or where I was, I always had my mind on the materials I was studying. By wholly fixating your mind to studying, you can draw the most out of this simple method. I even dreamed of studying in my sleep. Additionally, I relieved my stress by swimming, which helps you to clear your body and mind,” said Jeon. “For me, the reason I was able to pass the test despite the lack of time in the middle of my school semester was because I put focus on the sample questions when I was studying. By analytically studying the sample questions and figuring out the main scope of the test questions, I think I was able to efficiently prepare for the test and obtain the best result,” revealed Cho. Both Jeon and Cho were in Examination Class in Hayang, where they were funded with dormitory, studying facilities and meals. They both joined study groups to find people whom they can study with and to exchange help. They took mock tests together as a group and shared their knowledge, which turned out to be a great studying method. Both of them showed great appreciation to the group members as they were in the similar situation, which means their circumstances and emotions were highly relatable to each other. The examination is largely divided into four stages, which are carried out over five days. This year’s was Jeon’s fourth and the last test, for which he exceptionally did not have a good feeling for. “To be honest, I thought I’d pass the test every year because I had a good feeling. But this year, I had several ominous happenings such as a cockroach climbing onto my toe or breaking my glasses on the first test day, which never happened in three years. However, to overcome the bad feelings, I screamed ‘a crisis is an opportunity!’ on my scooter,” chuckled Jeon. The day before the final test, in Jeon’s dream, countless shooting stars poured onto his head, which gave him hope. In Cho’s case, once again, it depended on her perspective. “I doubted myself at first because I was so anxious. However, I regarded the test as just another test from my school, which I believe helped me to do better unconsciously. Jeon (left) and Cho (right) are two proud Hanyangians who added honor to the school. 99 percent effort, 1 percent luck Interestingly, both Jeon and Cho said that passing the examination was unexpected, not to mention receiving the top scores. They were more than glad and thankful for the result, and they confessed that they felt a little lucky. The outcome of their efforts is deeply meaningful, as their reasons for taking the test was definite. For Jeon, when he was researching for his career when he was 20 years old, he first came across the Technique Examination. Since he wanted to have a job that would greatly contribute to the interest of the public, he was convinced that he would prepare for the test in the future. On the very day he was discharged from the ROTC (Reserve Officers' Training Corps), he went straight into the Examination Class and started studying. Similarly, Cho took the test because she was inspired by his father who is a dedicated public officer who works devotedly for the country. She realized taking the test would lead her to the most desired path that accorded with her values. There were hard times, as their journey was not an easy task. Jeon felt considerable burden as he doubted himself after failing from his first try. He confessed that overcoming that fear was the hardest thing as nothing was guaranteed for sure. For Cho, who had to attend her first semester’s courses, balancing and managing her studying for both her classes and the Technique Examination was not easy. Due to their relatedness in the contents, she was able to handle both of them at the same time. Now that they have passed the first door toward their dream, their goals have been laid ahead. Jeon wants to be a green architecturer who is well-recognized by his peers. He wants to contribute to Korea’s well-being at large, which is why he decided to take the Technique Examination at the first place. On the other hand, Cho wants to contribute to Korea’s energy field. Since Korea does not produce natural resources, she wants to contribute to stabilization of the country by excluding any turbulence caused by energy shortage. "Don't feel too disappointed and never give up!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-01 11

[Alumni]Proud International Students of Hanyang

The number of international students in Hanyang University(HYU) are increasing year after year, and now they consists of a certain portion of the school. Over 400 students entered HYU in one semester, from 43 different countries. The international students not only learn the curriculum from our school, but are also giving large outputs as proud Hanyangians. News H met 3 students who came from overseas to study in HYU and decided to continue their career in Korea. A desire to do what I want “I first came to HYU just because it was a sister school of my university in China,” started off Jiao Liu (Mechanical Engineering, ’17). He was interested in the area of computational analysis, and therefore took lectures related to his interests. He had to start off with the basic theories of math, epidemiology, and so on to interpret and analyze data processing professionally. “I had an ardent wish to study in the Applied Aerodynamics Laboratory run by professor Cho Jin-soo. As I exerted my time in his lab, I was able to gain practical experience for my career,” reminisced Liu. Liu is now working in the Hyundai Motors Technology lab of China, working in the Computer Aided Engineering(CAE) department. He analyzes the static stiffness and vibration noise through CAE interpretation, to develop motor vehicles. As a foreigner in Korea, Liu had his own difficulties. “I only had a few friends in Korea as an international student. However, as I stayed in the lab, my professors and colleagues helped me whenever I was sick or in troubles. I sincerely want to thank them for their kindness,” explained Liu. He is now in his second year of work, and thanked HYU for letting him successfully seeking a career in Korea. “I graduated a school which empowers talented people, I will also strive to become a great Hanyangian myself!” "I want to invite my parents to Korea and live together." (Photo courtesy of Liu) Having my own unique outfit “I realized I liked and was talented in designing clothes through after-school activities in China,” said Yuan Ying (Clothing and textiles, Doctoral program 4th year). Yuan achieved her dream of majoring clothing design in an overseas university through HYU. Yuan entered HYU in 2010, majoring in clothing and textiles and continued on her doctoral degree in 2014. In 2016, she entered a start-up club to actualize her dream. Yuan explained “Specific clothing trends change in two weeks term. However, this term is too short to design, produce and commercialize clothing by myself. That’s why I came up with creating a ‘production automation’ platform.” Yuan created an application named ‘Design U’, which includes the functions of production automation. Product automation is an idea which all procedures before the actual sewing could be completed automatically, with anyone’s own idea. Through this application, Yuan allows customers to create their own design, collect people who wish to purchase the same design, and finally receive the clothes individually. “I wanted to provide a method for individuals to purchase clothes with whatever design, colors or fabric. I wish I could better systemize this platform in the near future and extend this to my home country,” commented Yuan. Yuan showing a page of her application, 'Design U'. For the better me ‘Hallyu’ was a major reason that enticed a student to enter a Korean university. “I studied Korean as I entered university, and started to dream of studying in Korea since then,” explained Han Ximeng (Accounting, Doctoral program ’17). Financial accounting was a familiar area for Han, as one of her family members was engaged in the field. She had been preparing for her Chinese Certified Public Accountant(CPA) after acquiring a private accountant license in China. She decided her career in HYU to better specialize in this area. Han not only concentrated in her studies, but tried out various part-time jobs and interns. “I taught undergraduate students on basic accounting theories. I also had a part-time job in a cosmetic trading firm as a translator, and worked in Korean cosmetic shops to improve the Korean nuance,” reminisced Han. After her various experiences, she realized financial accounting was what she truly wished to do. In order to be a Chief Financial Officer(CFO), she decided to look for a job in Korea. She is now working in the Accounting department of SK innovation affiliation SK General Chemical, writing settlement of accounts and annual reports. “It’s only my fifth month, and still have a lot more to learn. The actual task itself isn’t as new as the culture of companies. I had more hardships with speaking honorific words according to the position,” explained Han. She showed her aspiration to improve her abilities to be able to work in any country she happens to face. Han is achieving her dream step by step to become a CFO. (Photo courtesy of Han) On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-01 08

[Student]Winners of I·SEOUL·U Storytelling Competition

Two proud Hanyang University (HYU) students won first place in the I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition. It is hosted by the Seoul Metropolitan Government with its total prize money mounting up to 20 million won. Choi Hyun-jun (Entertainment Design, 3rd year), and Nam Jung-yeon (Communication Design, 3rd year), a close friend within the College of Design, teamed up for their first competition ever and were honored with the crown. From the left, Choi Hyun-jun (Entertainment Design, 3rd year), and Nam Jung-yeon (Communication Design, 3rd year). They were both interested in design from a young age. For the first time in forever The I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition is a part of Seoul's effort to promote its brand name: I·SEOUL·U. Its participants can depict their very own unique story about Seoul through a video, article, or poster. Nam and Choi chose video as it is Choi's major in school. There were a total of 625 pieces submitted, with one first place award, three second place awards, and six third place awards. Although lots of design college students participated in such competitions, it was the first time for both Nam and Choi to participate in one. “To be honest, I was afraid before. I was not sure of my own abilities,” mentioned Choi. Beginner’s luck or not, Choi and Nam showed perfect teamwork throughout November when they prepared for the competition. “People always ask us if we ever had conflicts, but we never had one,” smiled Choi. As a pair of close friends, they both mentioned that having someone to watch over and support one another was the key to completing their video. Choi, majoring in entertainment design, did most of the editing work. “Although putting 3D into videos is not part of my curriculum, I was able to self teach myself through a video society ‘Intro’ in our school,” said Choi. Nam, on the other hand, brainstormed with Choi and edited pictures and graphics in the video. Take a look at Choi and Nam's ingenious story. (Video courtesy of Choi and Nam) The hardest part of the production was the filming. Because the team had to rent a 4K camera, they had to fit all of their filming schedule into one day. Considering that the sites were dispersed all around Seoul, they had to begin in the early morning, use time in its utmost efficiency and wrap up before sunset. The time lapse sunset in the video was taken by the team in the peak of Inwang mountain for four hours. When asked about the source of their brilliant ideas, Nam answered, ‘lots of brainstorming and our imagination.’ For instance, Nam always used to think, ‘what if there is another reason for people walking in the street?’ and they came up with an idea of magnets pulling people around in the streets. “The whole point of the video was to visualize the extraordinary reasons behind ordinary activities in our imagination,” said Nam. Creativity to gravity The inspiring ideas of the team was the crucial reason for attracting the minds of people. The winner of the I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition is first decided on the professionals’ evaluation on creativity, art, aptness to the topic, and utility. Then, the remaining 40% is up to the people’s choice. We do not know exactly how many votes the team received, but assuming from the results, Choi and Nam must have caught people’s eyes with their original ideas. "There was no secret recipe for overcoming hardships. We just bore with it. Pulling all-nighters is a usual thing for design students anyways," said Choi. When asked about the usage of their prize money of 5 million won, both plan to spend the money on purchasing devices related to their major. Nam would like to purchase a tablet so that she can enhance her productivity during the semester, and Choi plans to buy a camera, supposedly a choice based on the difficulty they had filming videos the past month. Choi and Nam would like to challenge once again in a competition, as they find each other a perfect teammate. Right now, however, they have their hands busy on their internship. “I am learning a lot, managing a project from A to Z. Making a video for my school project and for a client are two very different jobs, but I enjoy it,” mentioned Choi, with a smile on his face. Both plan to proceed in their profession according to their major. With the passion and ability they have now, they have a bright future ahead. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-01 02

[Alumni]A Doctor at an Art Museum

What does the field of medicine and art have in common? To that question, doctor Park Kwang-hyuk (Department of Medicine, ’00) answers that they both revolve around the life and death of humans. While the field of medicine works strenuously to lengthen human lives by finding the cause and remedies for diseases, art strives to capture the essence from various moments in a person’s life. Having found this intriguing factor, Park has devoted his life equally to each of these fields. He works as a physician before noon, and gives art lectures in the afternoon. The audience of his lectures are somewhat varied, from corporations to public offices and schools. One lecture that he gives on a regular basis is through his weekly art gathering, the Mona Lisa Smile. The Mona Lisa Smile The name 'Mona Lisa Smile', suggested by one of the members, has a dual meaning. The first is quite literal, referring to the mysterious smile of Mona Lisa, one of the most symbolic works of art in the Louvre Museum. The second meaning is derived from the movie, The Mona Lisa Smile. In the film, the protagonist is an art instructor who attempts new approaches to art lectures. Park expressed satisfaction with the name, as it well captures the values that his gathering strives for: the love for art and the desire for new things. The Mona Lisa Smile is a social gathering that welcomes anyone who shares a love for art. (Photo courtesy of Park) When asked how the Mona Lisa Smile came to being, Park replied that he originally began with docent lectures, which is a type of lecture that handles art facts and history when some of his audiences approached him with a suggestion to begin a regular lecture. Intrigued by his lecture contents, they formed a regular social gathering for art lovers, where Park could give regular lectures. For Park, it was a great opportunity as he liked nothing more than to study art under various themes and prepare lectures to share his findings. Some of his most popular themes were “The plague in classical art”, “Gambling in classic art”, “Jealousy in classic art” and so on. The classes are held every Friday, from 7pm to 9pm, in Yeoksam-dong. About 30 to 40 people from a total of 70 members attend, where classical art is approached in a variety of perspectives, such as medicine, humanities, and so on. Not only are there lectures but also group museum tours from time to time on weekends. Although most of the members are artists and doctors, Park mentioned that he was surprised to find out the diverse professions of his audience, such as lawyers, pharmacists, accountants, and public servants. A Doctor at an Art Museum Park also published a book titled, “A Doctor at an Art Museum.” It is part of a series in which different fields are applied as windows to perceive classical art. There are books such as “A Chemist at an Art Museum,” “A Lawyer at an Art Museum,” and such. Park explained that the book was actually a collection of his lecture notes from the Mona Lisa Smile. Some of his members asked for a review note of his lectures to organize their contents, so he began sharing his analysis on internet communities. The notes had so great a reaction that people nudged him to organize them into a book. Park also wrote columns for art magazines from time to time, and some of them were also used for the book. Although his lectures revolve around a large number of themes, he was asked specifically to extract contents related to the field of medicine to emphasize his characteristic as a doctor. Park answered that he was surprised to find out that "A Doctor at the Art Museum" had a decent sales number. (Photo courtesy of Park) The story of Park Park recalls that he had been mesmerized by Greek Mythology as a child. As an introverted kid, he often turned to mythology books during his free time. However, his ideas and concept of various gods and myths were only in his imagination. It was when he encountered his first classical art piece that the ideas in his head were portrayed in real life. He realized that a picture really did speak a thousand words, and that there were details that he had never thought of before. It was in that moment when he realized his love for art. Later in his high school years, he witnessed the death of a protestor during a demonstration in Shinchon. Such a close encounter to death was a traumatic event for him, and he recalled that he was even physically ill for a few days. He had spent the rest of his life trying to forget the memory of what he had seen on that day. Then, during his second year in medical school, he went on a trip to Europe. He visited the Louvre Museum in Paris, where he was mysteriously drawn to the Liberty leading the People, drawn by Eugene Delacroix. He stood in front of the piece and shed tears for a long time. “I saw myself in that drawing. Among the protesters leading the rally, there was a frightened looking child, whom I found myself in.” He felt as if his old trauma was fading away and realized that there is a power in art which can heal people. Throughout the interview, Park was excited about his next lecture regarding the piece, The Girl with the Pearl Earrings Now Park is living a happy life pursuing his interests and his profession. He jokingly added that many people think that he must make a lot of profit from his activities, but as a father of five daughters, he has to work very hard to maintain his life balance of both fields. He plans to lead this lifestyle for as long as he can, and when asked about any of his long term goals, Park answered that he hopes to publish another book in the future. In his last comments, Park wanted to tell the readers that there are many domestic artists who are extremely talented but have a hard time maintaining their professions. Just like the late artist Vincent Van Gogh, artists cannot keep up with their living expenses and only draw. He expressed deep sympathy, as domestic art museums such as Hangaram Museum, Somang Museum, and many small galleries in Insa-dong carry a number of art works from talented artists who haven’t had a chance to get any spotlight. Although he himself holds small auctions to raise support funds for unknown artists, he hopes to see many more opportunities and events to promote talented, yet unknown Korean artists. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun