Total 196Articles
News list
Content Forum List
2019-06 19

[Faculty]Incorporating Philosophy into Science and Life

Professor Yi Sang-wook (Department of Philosophy) gave a lecture on "The Unknown Story of Geniuses" on the Distinguishing Class (차이나는 클라스) show on JTBC which premiered on June 5th. Yi explained the prejudices in science and of scientifically important figures, and accentuated the importance of learning the philosophy of science in order to prevent such blind faith. Professor Yi Sang-wook (Department of Philosophy) is explaining the key ideas in his lecture on the JTBC show Distinguishing Class (차이나는 클라스). Distinguishing Class suggested that the lecture be based on Yi’s book Science Calls This Imagination, published earlier this year. As his final statements on the show, Yi encouraged students to study the philosophy of science. He added during the interview that it is important to make wise decisions based on media literacy, which is the ability to decode the various forms of media autonomously, especially in our modern society which is overflowing with information. He argued that the ability to understand, criticize, and oversee society, as a participating citizen, is crucial in the 21st century. He added that the mandatory elective course at Hanyang University named “Philosophical Understanding of Science Technology” was created for this purpose, to foster civic literacy. Piles of books were stacked in the office, clearly showing Yi's passion for them. Yi has experiences of giving lectures to students from science high schools, and he pointed out that many students view only the renowned scientists as making important discoveries, based on the elitism that they had grown accustomed to. He argued, “Science is fundamentally a social activity.” Not even a genius scientist can influence a large chunk of science, but many small contributions from unknown scientists lead up to the discovery of an innovative scientist that lead human civilization. Yi says he loves the family-like atmosphere of the Department of Philosophy, especially the rolling papers his students prepare for him every year. Yi originally majored in and had a master’s degree in Physics. His doctoral degree of Philosophy at the London School of Economics and Political Science was a slight change of direction, although he himself does not think so. He stated that until the 19th to early 20th century, physics handled science philosophy, as Heinrich Rudolf Hertz's books introduced contents such as how physics sees the world. Physics research processes were very labor-oriented and repetitive, whereas he found himself well-suited to philosophy, since he liked to explore the fundamental questions of life. Yi stated his wishes to write more books in the near future. He has also been acting as a member of the World Commission on the Ethics of Scientific Knowledge and Technology (COMEST) since last year, and he has been engaging in creating the declaration of ethics in regard to artificial intelligence. He has come to realize the necessity of international cooperation in changing the world, and the efforts required to actually have an impact on global society, through working at the United Nations. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Joo-eun

2019-05 28

[Student]A Precious Silver for Hanyang Judo Team Captain

The 12th Cheong-poong Judo Competition was held for five days from May 1st to May 5th. At one of the largest judo competitions in Korea, along with the Jeju-cup and Suncheonman-cup, Cho Young-hak (Department of Physical Education, 4th year), the captain of the Hanyang Judo team, managed to produce an outstanding result by winning the silver medal in the 81 kg class individual division. Cheong-poong Judo Competition Cheong-poong Judo Competition is one of the largest judo competitions in Korea both in its size and reputation. Having first started in 2008 as Cheong-poong National Judo Competition, targeting elementary, middle, and high school students only, it was in 2015 that the competition was extended beyond students to include assortments of all classes. Except for in 2011 and 2012, the competition has been held in Cheongju due to the reputation of the area within South Korean judo. Second from left, Cho Young-hak (Department of Physical Education, 4th year) has won the silver medal in the Cheong-poong Judo Competition 81 kg class individual division. (Photo Courtesy of Cho) 260 teams (1,843 individuals) for the individual division and 130 teams (980 individuals) for the team events participated in this year’s competition. An additional 180 individuals were also present for the university club division, bringing the total to 3003 participants for this year’s competition. Cho managed to make it to the finals, having successive victories since the round of 32. During the finals, Cho gave away half the points to his opponent, with 40 seconds remaining. “Not having enough rest after the semi-finals, I think that fatigue was the main reason behind my loss. Still, it was a nice experience, and I will prepare more for other competitions,” stated Cho. Captain of the Hanyang team First starting judo during his second year in elementary school, Cho managed to win his first medal a year later. It was this medal that solidified Cho’s interest in the sport and led him to this point. Now being the captain of Hanyang Judo Team, Cho showed his passion for judo. Despite his success in the Cheong-poong competition, rather than showing satisfaction, Cho stated how he felt his shortages through the tournament and how he was inspired to train even harder. He also added that he will prepare well for upcoming competitions in the future, having the goal of joining a business team or the Korea Armed Forces Athletic Corps after graduation. Being the captain of Hanyang Judo Team, Cho showed his dedication toward preparing himself and his teammates for future competitions. (Photo Courtesy of Cho) Cho also asked for more interest in and support for the school team. He explained that “Only two players were admitted to Hanyang per year, yet even this recruitment has stopped, leaving only the six current members. With us all being in different weight classes, it is difficult for us to practice with only each other. A more supportive environment for training would be a great help to the team." Despite the small number, Cho and his team members have shown great results. According to Cho, judo is a stepping stone towards his next life. Having guided the Hanyang Judo team well, the anticipation towards future competitions is high for both Cho and his teammates. Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-05 27

[Student]Color Scripter, an Individual Project Created by a Middle Schooler

With industries' increasing interest in programming, the number of individuals and professionals who pursue further study in the field has significantly increased. However, in the time before programming and coding became so popular, it was difficult to read and recognize codes due to their complexity. Lee Young-soo (Department of Computer Science, 4th year) was a young man interested in programming who felt the same inconvenience and tried to look for various programs that increased the readability of codes. He found that none that were satisfying, and as a result, decided to make his own. This is how he first created Color Scripter, a beloved coding program, at the age of 16 as a middle schooler. Lee Young-soo (Department of Computer Science, 4th year) made his first program Color Scripter when he was 16. What is Color Scripter? Color Scripter is a program that enhances the readability of codes on the Web by changing codes’ colors. Approximately 500 to 600 users utilize this program daily, and more than 100 languages and themes created by users are registered on the website. This program is specialized in Korea as a platform that simplifies the process of code posting, specifically in Naver blogs. There are diverse languages in programming, and it was extremely burdensome to accommodate all the languages that users require, so Lee decided to open the ‘Extended Store (확장스토어)’ service that allows users to spontaneously upload their own languages and themes to share. Users can spontaneously make their own language packages or styles through the 'Extended Store (확장스토어)' (Photo courtesy of Color Scripter website) When and why did you start an individual project? “I started programming when I was in 5th grade in elementary school. It started as a hobby, but as I spent more time on it, I was determined to pursue programming as a career path,” said Lee. The earliest version of Color Scripter was invented when Lee was in the 3rd grade of middle school. He made the program for his own convenience at first. However, as Lee shared his codes coated with Color Scripter in his blog, other users began to recognize the usefulness of the program and started using it. The number of users increased considerably, and Lee felt responsibility to run a website for the convenience of others. “It left a certain mark when users used Color Scripter and added a viral effect as well. I first started this project for my own good, but as many people were using my program, I felt a sense of pride and the necessity to run the website and constantly update the program,” recalled Lee. As Color Scripter was simply an individual project, Lee felt no burden or discomfort when running the website. This is because if the purpose of the program was to earn a profit, Lee would feel great responsibility and deal with users’ complaints; however, Lee actively notifies users that Color Scripter is just a hobby for him, and that is why the program is serviced for free, and all of its users are aware. However, when it comes to the website's operating expenses, Lee has to spend his own money. As an ordinary university student, Lee faced a financial burden. “At first, I tried to cover all the operating expenses by myself, but as time went on, it became more and more burdensome. I confessed to the users that I was facing such an issue, and that I had to open a sponsorship section. I did not expect so much monetary assistance in the beginning, but I actually received money three days after I opened the section. I felt a great sense of humanity that day,” smiled Lee. After Lee opened the sponsorship section, he no longer had to spend his own money to cover the operating expenses. Lee picks the opening of the sponsorship section as the most meaningful experience that not only resolved his financial burden of website operating expenses, but also made him feel a sense of humanity. What is your future plan? According to Lee, “Some people tell me to start charging for use of the program, but I have no plans at all of doing so. I believe it is a better and worthwhile experience to run a website with sponsorship from my users. I want the self-consistent ecosystem within Color Scripter where users’ needs are satisfied by themselves. Color Scripter has its special meaning that has grown with me and served me with good memories.” Lee has not yet decided on a specific career path since he is still finding out what he truly wants to do. Many acquaintances recommended he launch a start-up business, but he wants more preparation and is waiting for a definite item that will be profitable. Color Scripter has a special meaning in that it grew with him and provided him with many good memories. Since Color Scripter was first made when he was young, it lacked organization. As he entered Hanyang University, he was able to notice numerous successful examples of well-organized programs and acquire knowledge that he usefully applied to his program. “I started this project all by myself. I just want to say that if you look around at your friends, they all are experts in certain areas and may have a common interest. I hope other students experience success in team projects. If I had the chance, I would have definitely tried with my friends,” concluded Lee. Kim Min-jae fhffl5781@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Joo-eun

2019-05 26

[Student]Dads Are Back with The New Grey

Lim Ji-woo il04131@hanyang.ac.kr Photos courtesy of The New Grey Photos by Kim Joo-eun Design by Lim Ji-woo, Kim Min-ji

2019-04 08

[Student]Pursuit of a Dream Beyond Borders

Hanyang University's basketball team is currently in ninth place in the 2019 KUFS University League, hosted by the Korean University Basketball Federation (KUBF). This is all thanks to the excellent players the team has, one of whom is Khishgee Boldsukh (Department of Physical Education, 2nd year). He has performed sensationally in this year's university league, scoring an average of over 20 points in the first four games. Having entered Hanyang University in September of 2018, Boldsukh is a 189cm player who is currently having a great debut season, ranking third in the individual scoring chart with a total of 86 points. Khishgee Boldsukh (Department of Physical Education, 2nd year) has peformance exceptionally during the first three games of the 2019 KUFS University League. Pursuing his dream in Korea Born in Mongolia, Boldsukh came to Korea at the age of eleven, after his grandparents passed away. As Boldsukh’s mother was living in Korea at the time, he came to the country in the need of a guardian. As soon as he arrived in Korea, Boldsukh entered Sahwa Elementary School and joined the basketball team, which was the start of his career as a basketball player in Korea. Moving onto Palryong Middle School and Masan High School, Boldsukh pursued his career by joining both schools' basketball teams. Although Boldsukh was allowed to play on basketball teams, it was his nationality as a foreigner that prevented him from playing in regular leagues such as the National Sports Festival. Boldsukh’s nationality also presented additional hardships such as not being covered by national health insurance and many complications related to documentation paperwork. However, such difficulties did not prevent Boldsukh from pursuing his dream, and he was admitted to Hanyang University in 2018, based on his exceptional basketball skills. Boldsukh faced numerous hardships while pursuing his career as a foreign player in Korea. Becoming a key player Even after his admission to Hanyang University, Boldsukh was not allowed to play in last year’s University League due to the regulations on foreign players. It was only after Boldsukh received his Korean citizenship in October of 2018 that he was able to register as a player, finally making his debut in the 2019 KUSF University League. According to Boldsukh, last year was a difficult season for not only himself but also for the Hanyang University team itself, as he had to watch the team failing to make it to the playoffs from the bench. However, with Boldsukh joining the team, the outlook for the team seemed to be bright this season. “Our team members have formed a close relationship, which resulted in showing great teamwork. We also are specialized at swift attacks based on a strong defense,” answered Boldsukh, when asked about the strengths of Hanyang University team. As for his individual performance, Boldsukh gave the credit to his teammates, explaining how basketball is a team game, and that it was their great support that led to his outstanding performance. Boldsukh has an important role in helping the Hanyang University team make the playoffs this season. Boldsukh is playing a pivotal role on the team in that his outstanding performance is earning high scores and raising their rankings. As of April 8th, Boldsukh has scored a total of 81 points, 21 points on average per game, which makes him the highest scorer among Hanyang players, and third in the league's individual player scoring chart. Even his defensive contributions are high with Boldsukh managing to make a total of nine steals throughout the first four games, which places him sixth out of all the players. As for his goal at Hanyang University, Boldsukh has showed his hopes towards winning the University League. Going further, his dream is to join a professional team after graduation, eventually becoming a member of the Korean National Basketball Team. In the short run, however, Boldsukh’s main focus is to take the team to the playoffs this year and help his current teammates have a successful season. Meeting Kyunghee University on April 24th as their next opponent, Boldsukh's passion will once again be seen, doing his best to help the team achieve its next victory. Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Guen-hyung

2019-04 08

[Student]Health Tourism Platform Corporation, KMK, Established by Kazakhstan International Students and a Korean Student

In a globalized world where active interaction among countries is taking place, the trend of participating in the exchange student program is also flourishing. Thanks to the program, students can now learn and directly experience various cultures while studying in different countries. Nonetheless, when it comes to getting a job, since not as many opportunities are open to foreign people as they are to local people, they struggle through hardships. Despite such harsh reality, Taldybayev Zhanadil (School of Business, Master’s Program), an international student from Kazakhstan, successfully launched a corporation called KMK, which provides a platform for medical tourism in South Korea. Talybayev Zhanadil (School of Business, Master’s Program)'s interest in South Korea eventually led him to start a business with a good prospect. Taldybayev first came to South Korea for a year as an exchange student when he was an undergraduate student. He was majoring in Oriental studies in his country and selected the South Korea track, allowing him to learn Korean history and culture. As his interest in Korea grew considerably throughout the journey of his undergraduate life, he decided to broaden his knowledge and perspective regarding Korea, thereby, enrolling in a graduate program at Hanyang University. Taldybayev wanted to start a business in Korea in relation to Kazakhstan with a friend named Kakim Danabayev (Media and Communication, Doctorate Program), because by the time he came to Korea a year and a half ago, South Korea and Kazakhstan had became strategic partners, and many Korean industries entered their partner country. Under such circumstances, he predicted a profitable vision if he started a business, and fortunately, Taldybayev came across a start-up assistance program at Hanyang University. When he was looking for an outstanding item for starting a business, his mother came to Korea to receive medical care, since Korea has one of the highest quality medical service industries in the world. After his mother received successful medical treatment, his friends’ parents also wanted to take advantage of such advanced treatment. “I realized that health tourism between Korea and Kazakhstan possess great potential as a business item. With this brilliant idea, I started preparing for the start-up in April of 2018 and submitted the business plan to the Hanyang Start-up Lounge,” said Taldybayev. As a result, his business passed the standard, and he was able to establish his own corporation, KMK, in October 2018. Taldybayev wants to broaden his business to all countries in former Soviet countries. What KMK does is promote Korean medical services and provide information to Kazakhstani customers. The service includes not only translation, escort to the hospitals, and consultations, but also offers Seoul or Incheon city tours if desired. There are three co-representatives of KMK: Taldybayev, Kakim, and Kim Seul-ah (School of Business, Healthcare Management Track, Doctorate Program). For Kakim, he specializes in marketing, as he is a renowned journalist and blogger in Kazakhstan. He wrote numerous articles regarding Korea before he even started this business. Talybayev said, “I first met him at a job fair at COEX. Because of Kakim’s popularity, I could recognize him at first glance. I approached Kakim and felt a sense of comradeship since we are from the same country.” Coincidently, Kakim also was a Hanyang University student and they became friendly in a short amount of time. Taldybayev suggested starting a business with Kakim, and he accepted the proposal. However, as both Kazakhstani students were foreigners, they thought they needed a Korean person to be part of their plan; thus, Taldybayev scouted his fellow lab friend Kim to participate, and she instantly agreed. The three co-representatives of KMK, from left, Kim Seul-ah, Taldybayev Zhanadil, and Kakim Danabayev, provide the medical tour platform for Kazakhstani people. (Photo courtesy of Talybayev) Kakim is in charge of the marketing department, and Kim takes care of administrative duties related to Korea. With the vast network Kakim has, they tried to cast celebrities through social media like his individual blog and Instagram accounts, the result of which was remarkable. A Kazakhstani member of the National Assembly and a top-ten successful businessman in Kazakhstan, Kairat Kudaibergen, who has over 1.2 million followers on Instagram, promoted both KMK and Korean medical services. Instead of paying him, KMK covered his fee by providing him with medical care for free. Taldybayev recalled, “I stayed in Korea for two days with Kairat. With the high-quality medical service and tour, he was extremely satisfied with the trip.” Such high satisfaction consecutively led to networking with other Kazakhstani celebrities, allowing the business to flourish. Taldybayev currently lives in the dorm provided by the Hanyang Start-up Lounge, which is difficult to get into, at no charge. With a requirement of a number of interviews and the submission of start-up reports, only thirty candidates are permitted. In addition, the residents should submit weekly reports that include the overall plans for business activity. Taldybayev insisted, “Although the procedure is quite tough, I received plenty of help from the people living there, as we shared ideas, gave feedback on each other’s business plans, and gave advice on how to overcome hardships.” The Hanyang Start-up Lounge offers concrete and detailed assistance to these residents to help them actualize their plans. KMK is planning to scout renouned Russian celebrities to further promote its corporation and the outstanding quality of Korean medical services. (Photo courtesy of Taldybayev) The current trend of Kazakhstani people visiting South Korea is increasing annually. 15,000 people come for medical purposes and 25,000 for tours. Over the past three years, the number of visitors has increased by about 90 percent, and it is expected to increase even further. With the growing number of visitors, Taldybayev hopes to draw more clients to help his business grow. Eventually, Taldybayev wants his business to expand not only throughout Kazakhstan, but also to all former Soviet countries. Kim Min-jae fhffl5781@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-03 25

[Student]The Youngest to Conquer the 4 Deserts Grand Slam 2018

An ordinary young man serving in the military was fascinated by a magazine that he read by chance, which covered the story of three first reserves (military reserve force) who completed a marathon in the Gobi Desert. “What brings these people to the desert? Why would they do such a thing?” Many questions emerged in the young man's head, which later led him to chasing some life-changing experiences. The young man in the military was Yoo Dong-hyeon (Department of Electrical Bio-Engineering, 1st year), who became the youngest male in the world to complete the Grand Slam, at the age of 22. Yoo Dong-hyeon (Department of Electrical Bio-Engineering, 1st year) shared his story of the four deserts that he conquered, on March 22, 2019. The rocky beginning Yoo was strongly drawn to the idea of participating in the race, but by the time he found out about the four deserts race series, he only had three months to prepare. He was still serving in the military, so he needed permission for overseas travel. Moreover, he had to receive donations to cover the races' costly entry fees. He mostly received sponsorships from companies, individual donations from seniors that he knew from high school, and from colleagues from the military. It was Yoo’s first time participating in a marathon, so he needed to exercise and enhance his stamina before the real events began. Many factors were in the way of his participation, but fortunately, with great luck, all was set and he was signed in. The courses of the desert race The Sahara Race was first in the 4 race series that began in late April until early May, and took place in the Namib Desert in Skeleton Coast National Park on the coast bordering the Atlantic Ocean. The Gobi March takes place in Central Mongolia during the hot summer months, and the course brings runners through vast green grasslands, stupas, and temples. His favorite race was the Atacama Crossing in Chile. The course consists of infamous salt flats, huge sand dunes, canyons, and glittering night skies. It was also the most memorable because his shoes got ripped and his feet bled due to the piercing salt from the region. However, the place had the most beautiful night skies with thousands of visible stars. The Last Desert in Antarctica had 10 courses including many tracks that visited islands and bays. During the Atacama Crossing, hardened salt pierced through shoes and left the participants in pain no choice but to speed through the desert. (Photo courtesy of Yoo) The magnificent night skies of (top) the Sahara and Atacama Deserts (Photo courtesy of Yoo) Yoo Dong-hyeon (center) happily crossing the finishing line of the Atacama Crossing alongside his friends. (Photo courtesy of Yoo) While running During the race across the desert, Yoo met many people of various backgrounds and nationalities. Among them, there was a visually impaired man and a person with one leg. While Yoo had been complaining all throughout his life about things small and big, his new friends were relaxed and seemed happy. “I learned to be thankful for what I had and to be more relaxed in my life.” Walking through Antarctica, the Last Desert (Photo courtesy of Yoo) Groups of penguins welcoming the marathoners to Antarctica (Photo courtesy of Yoo) The tent mates slept together in one tent after the race was over for the day. (Photo courtesy of Yoo) If the runners finished the race early, they would gather around near the campfire with their dinner in hand, and talk about the many ongoing global issues. (Photo courtesy of Yoo) After the marathon “What does a marathon mean to you?” After hearing this question, Yoo took his time to answer. “Marathon is now what I live with every day. I used to give up easily, but now I know that hard times pass, and regardless of the speed or the time it takes to get there, I can finish the race.” Yoo completing his marathon journey after the race of the Last Desert 2018 (Photo courtesy of Yoo) Yoo hugging fellow runners after the first Sahara race ended (Photo courtesy of Yoo) The 4 Deserts Grand Slam crew at their last destination (Photo courtesy of Yoo) Although he is very proud of his achievements, Yoo also felt hollow after the marathon. Looking for more challenges, he is planning on participating in a triathlon held in Korea, as well as going on a cross-country bike trip across America through a contest being held in July 2019. With his glowing eyes full of excitement, he advised, “Do not hesitate. It is easy to be frightened by the titles like the race of the polar regions, but human beings are stronger than you think. I hope you challenge yourselves to grow bigger.” Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-03 12

[Alumni]From an Architect to an Illustrator

While some university students choose their double majors in accordance with their academic preferences and passions, others only apply for the majors that correspond to certain conditions such as grades. For the latter group, it is important that they find their true interest during their college years. Jung Jin-ho (Department of Architecture, ’13) is an illustrator from the Department of Architecture who went through such a situation. His life-long dream of becoming an architect changed into the dream of being an illustrator who inspires and pleases young readers. Jung Jin-ho (Department of Architecture, ’13) is an illustrator who is an alumnus of the Department of Architecture. He is reading his award-winning picture book Wall. Originally, Jung’s dream was to become a renowned architect, which is why he chose the Department of Architecture. During his 4th year, he signed a contract for a year-long internship at the architecture company he always wanted to join. However, the reality was considerably different from his expectations, and this internship experience became the turning point of reconsidering his original dream. Jung struggled to find a job that genuinely suited his passion during his 5th year of college, since his life-long goal to become a successful architect had suddenly collapsed due to the experience of the frustrating reality of the field. While he was contemplating his future, Jung recalled that since his childhood he had always liked reading picture books. Due to a serious burn he had received, Jung had to spend most of his time in the hospital. “I made a lot of friends at the hospital. Some of them were seriously ill. I remember a friend who had lost an arm. However, I had no prejudice against them. They were just like ordinary people and I felt no sense of difference between us. Through this experience at the hospital, I learned that having such bias was meaningless,” Jung stated. As activities for children are quite limited in the hospital, it was natural that he read a lot of picture books, which eventually became a major hobby that lasted to his adulthood. Considering his childhood background, Jung decided to create a picture book that also included a story of his 5th year of university life. Jung made four pieces in total that year. An Elephant Living in My House illustration (우리집에 코끼리가 산다) by Jung Jin-ho (Photo courtesy of Jung's Grafolio) The books Look up! (위를 봐요!), Wall (벽), Soil and a Worm (벽과 지렁이), and Owl (부엉이), received great attention and love from the public, and also won Jung an award. The piece Look up! was especially highly evaluated in terms of architecture. He applied what he had learned in university over four years to his book, and this challenging spirit and refreshing attempt gained recognition from experts. Jung notes, “Whereas many authors get inspiration from other peoples’ stories, I focus on my past experiences. In Wall I reflected the knowledge I learned from my major, and in 3 Second Diving I reflected on my elementary school life. Since my first piece, which was the primary momentum to become an illustrator-author, reflects the most about my personal story, I feel the greatest attachment to it.” After receiving several awards, he gets numerous calls from interested libraries and schools. Jung also has been giving lectures to both teenagers and adults since 2015. The content of the lectures differs depending on the audiences' level of understanding level about art. For younger generations, he prepares a variety of activities such as building blocks and drawing simple pictures, while giving theoretical explanations of picture books to adults. While he travels around giving lectures, he plans to write one or two books a year at the same time. Jung hopes university students find their genuine interest. It was lucky for him to debut in the field of illustration and novels, as Professor Kang Min-kyung from the College of Humanities sent Jung’s pieces to several publishing companies, all of which offered a positive response. Jung’s goal is not grand. He just wants to maintain his career in this field for a lifetime; however, many illustrators are unable to due to inconsistent income. Jung said, “There was one respectable professor that I really liked. He always insisted that becoming a master is achieved when you constantly put forth a strong effort without craving for it. I just want to survive in this field and work for my true interest.” Jung adds, “Many people work in a different area that is irrelevant to their major, but it’s okay. By doing so, they can make their own attractive story. Broaden your perspective and be confident. Everything you have learned can always be helpful to what you will be in the future.” Kim Min-jae fhffl5781@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-03 11

[Alumni]The 2019 Icon of Korean Tradition

The Brand Prize Award, hosted by The Korean Herald, is given to those who have made a significant achievement in their field over the year. Having been recognized for her efforts with the gayageum, also known as the Korean harp, Park Ji-yun (Department of Korean Traditional Music, Doctorate, '16) was awarded the Grand Prize for the Arts Sector of the 2019 Brand Prize Award. As a traditional musician who has played the gayageum for over 30 years, Park's new goal has been to pass her knowledge on to her students, starting her life as a teacher. As a musician Starting with playing the piano during her early years, Park showed a talent for music. She first encountered the gayageum as a hobby, having been attracted by its monophonic features. Switching from the piano to the gayageum when she was 13, it has been over 30 years since Park has played the traditional Korean instrument. During her long years of devotion, Park has managed to make major achievements within the field. Park successfully put on a concert last December with the Seocho Philharmoniker, being the first to have an accompanied performance with a symphony orchestra. (Click to go to the video of Park's accompanied performance) “The gayageum is often regarded as a boring and dull form of music by many. I wanted to overcome this wrong belief that many carry, and in order to do so, I had to take some new departures,” explained Park. She further explained how the orchestra is often considered main stream within the musical field and, thus, she wanted to show how the gayageum can be successfully collaborated with other more popular forms of music. Park is also preparing two albums which she is planning to release by next year at the latest. Park has long put in efforts towards making the gayageum closer to the public. (Photo courtesy of Park) Park stated that her first album is one that is going to focus on the traditional features of the gayageum. Having entered her forties, Park explained that she wanted to record and share her recitals, which have now been accumulated with over 30 years of practice. On the other hand, the second album is to be a duet with the electone, an electronic organ that has features of automatic accompaniments and tone modulation, which is a new challenge to the gayageum. Such efforts show Park’s long desire of bringing the gayageum closer to the public through various innovations, while still stressing its traditional features. As a professor Having majored in the gayageum during her high school and college years, Park further pursued her studies at Hanyang University, receiving both her master's and doctorate degrees in the field of traditional Korean music. Park first focused on gaining practical experience by joining an orchestra after her college graduation. After playing with the orchestra until her early thirties, however, Park decided to change her career path towards becoming an instructor and sharing her knowledge of the gayageum. First starting her teaching career at Gugak National High School, it was during these years that Park became determined to pursue her studies within the field. While studying for her doctorate, Park was also given the opportunity to teach at Hanyang University. In addition to having lessons with the students majoring in Korean traditional music, Park has also taught courses for other majors such as the Department of Composition, as they had to widen their scope of music. During her teaching career, Park stated that it is when her students are praised by others that she feels the most worthwhile. Park is now focusing on transferring her deep knowledge of the gayageum along to her students as a professor. (Photo courtesy of Park) Now holding an additional post as a professor for the Department of Korean Traditional Music in Hanyang University, Park maintained that her main goal as a professor is to bring honor to both the department and the school. In order to do so, she stated that she will not only pursue her own career in the field of the gayageum, but also help her students become musicians of higher levels within their own field. More than thirty years have passed since she first started playing the gayageum, and it seems as if Park’s passion is filled both as a musician and a professor. Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-02 18

[Student]MOYE, a Brand Created by Students From the Department of Clothing and Textiles

MOYE is a fashion brand created by a group of students from the Department of Clothing and Textiles. Its name consists of two meanings: it is a shortened word that comes from the sentence 'moduga yesoolgada,' which means ‘everyone is an artist’ in Korean, originally quoted by the artist Joseph Beuys; it also has the meaning of putting together the elderly and children, according to the dictionary. In this sense, MOYE implies that every ordinary person is an artist. For their project this time, the artists involved were elderly women from the Sageun-dong Elderly Welfare Center. This week, the creators of the brand, MOYE shared their brand story. (From left) Head officer Song Ha-yoon (Department of Clothing and Textiles, 3rd year), financial officer and designer Kim Seung-hyun (Department of Clothing and Textiles, 2nd year) and marketing officer and designer Lee Eun-joo (Department of Clothing and Textiles, 4th year) of MOYE As its name implies, the designers for MOYE are ordinary people. For their new project, MOYE decided to make elderly women their artists. Their reason for doing so was because the date of their project launch was on February 12th, which was after the Lunar New Year’s Day when the concept of a generation gap was felt the most. There is a reason behind why MOYE chose to use communication as the core identity of the brand. “I had the experience of transferring to different schools many times. From that, I realized the importance of having someone to talk to. I value everyone's story, so I wanted to listen to and deliver them through the medium of clothes,” said Song, the head officer of MOYE. The artists of MOYE’s project, the elderly from Sageun-dong Elderly Welfare Center, are drawing the designs for clothing. (Photo courtesy of Song) While there are many paths available for those wishing to launch a brand, the creators of MOYE decided to raise a funding at Wadiz, which is a crowd funding platform. This was a decision resulting from lessons the founders had learned last summer when their project was promoted off line. They faced the limitations of initial capital, lack of item diversity caused by mass production, and difficulty delivering the story behind their designed products. MOYE’s clothing line was created through four steps. First, the designers listened to and sympathized with the elderly at Sageun-dong Elderly Welfare Center. During this process, the MOYE designers caught a story with an impactful impression and asked them to draw their story. Finally, the designers refined the drawings and the stories are now being delivered through the completed clothing. One of MOYE's clothing designs called ‘Portrait’, which is the most sought-after clothing piece that depicts the lifetime of an artist in one single line. The colorful colors describe the emotions that follow a life event. (Photo courtesy of Song) “I was surprised to hear that a 73 year old artist that I worked with had learned photoshopping skills when she was younger. It sounds like a new generation's skill that the generation gap started to seem obscure to me,” recalled Kim. Beginning next week, MOYE’s next project is going to have children as their target, from vulnerable social groups. MOYE follows by the ideology that while they have artists from vulnerable social classes, they do not sell through emotional appeal. Rather, they plan to prove the excellence of pure imagination of children through commercial values. “I hope our next project will implant courage to the children, despite the insufficient love they might have received in the past.” A picture of the designers from team MOYE and their model. All models and photographers are from the Department of Clothing and Textiles. (Photo courtesy of Song) Clothes are worn and consumed by people every day, and MOYE successfully fulfilled their objective to communicate and deliver one’s story through clothing. While their online funding ends on March 3rd, MOYE plans on donating 100 percent of the net gains to the Sageun-dong Elderly Welfare Center. They will continue their projects by creating an official club on campus, with the aim of breaking down the stereotypes for beginning start-ups and the notion that finding employment is impossibly tough. Click here to view MOYE's clothing lines Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung