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02/28/2020 Interview > Faculty > 우수연구자

Title

[HY's Excellence] Editor-in-Chief of Routledge IR Theory and Practice in Asia, a Young Erudite Scholar Challenging Mainstream Ideas and Perspectives

Professor Yong-Soo Eun (Department of Political Science and International Studies )

한양뉴스포털

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Professor Yong-Soo Eun has been making an impact on the topic of diversity in international politics. The topic, which started with his questioning the diversity of theory and cognition, expanded to non-Western international politics, and eventually led him to the position of editor-in-chief of Routledge IR Theory and Practice in Asia. He is sparking notable discourse by working as an editor with famous scholars in the East and the West such as Peter J. Katzenstein (Cornell University), T. V. Paul (McGill University), and Qin Yaqing (China Foreign Affairs University). 
 
Professor Eun has been suggesting problems with mainstream ideas and perspectives while delving into international studies in depth. For example, while various theories have appeared and are being discussed in international relations, he was concerned whether a public forum is being formed, whether it is being practiced, and even whether various theories are acceptable beyond social and cultural boundaries and across borders. “On the surface, there are a variety of theories, but the underlying soil that creates theories lacks diversity. I also came to the realization that the process of reproducing knowledge, in terms of practicing and spreading knowledge based on mainstream thoughts, can further undermine diversity,” said Professor Eun. He put such thoughts in his publication Pluralism and Engagement in International Relations (2016). This book drew a lot of interest after being published by Macmillan (UK) and Springer (Germany). Released in e-book format, it has already been downloaded over 820 times. (https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9789811011207) 

He said, “I had some regrets over missed aspects in Pluralism and Engagement in International Relations that bothered me after its publication - namely the diversity of knowledge across geography and culture.” He thought that the ongoing problem of Western-centric international politics must be solved, so he suggested to Routledge a series of “IR Theory and Practice in Asia,” and now he publishes more than one book a year after assessing manuscripts from scholars from around the world. Professor Eun himself has published What Is at Stake in Building “Non-Western” IR Theory? (2018) as a part of the series. He noted, “What is important is that the field of international politics remain open, not dividing the West and the non-West to study non-Western international politics.”

About the memorable achievements of his recent research, Professor Eun mentioned an academic debate he had with Professor David Lake of the University of California, San Diego, who has held positions in the American Political Science Association and International Studies Association. Eun’s paper set forth the concept of “reflective solidarity” that Professor Lake had missed in the form of a reply to a publication by Professor Lake in 2016. This paper was published in the PS: Political Science, a journal of global influence. He emphasized that the coalition between Western and non-Western academics is more urgent and important than an expansion in the constituent of human resources that just brings non-Western academics to academia, to overcome the narrowness of the field of international politics and to realize true globalization. 
 
Professor Eun is focusing on research about “hybrid coloniality.” Through the theoretical view of postcolonialism, it critically analyzes international political events in the history of Korea’s anti-colonialism process and the responses of the Korean government along with their impacts on Korean diplomatic and security policies in terms of coloniality.  In particular, it captures the process and outcomes of Korea’s postcolonialism by converging the concepts of diversity and coloniality. It can ultimately overcome hybrid coloniality while considering alternative measures. If the past ways were approaches taken at material and institutional levels, then he studies ways to achieve independence and diversity of diplomacy on a cognitive level. 
 
Professor Eun collaborates with scholars from the East and the West to expand the diversity of international studies, apart from the publication of the Routledge series. In this context, he is partnering on research with Amitav Acharya who, like many other international scholars, holds a position in the International Studies Association. Notably, in recent times where Western-oriented liberal international order is being threatened, he has been studying and working with scholars from Southeast Asia to learn  what small and medium-powered Asian countries can do to ensure regional order. He aims to be a researcher who asks critical questions and presents alternatives to conventional wisdom about mainstream ideas via “reflective solidarity.”

 
- Associate Professor of Political Science and International Studies,  Hanyang University, Seoul, South Korea

- Editor-in-Chief, Routledge series, IR Theory and Practice in Asia, (https://www.routledge.com/series/IRTPA)

- Editorial board member, The Pacific Review

- Research Fellow, University of Warwick, UK 

- International Relations (IR) theory
- Diversity and pluralism in IR
- Sociology of knowledge 
- Philosophy of social science 
- Postcolonialism 
- Collective emotion and national identity  
- International politics in the Asia-Pacific region

“An Intellectual Confession from a Member of the ‘Non-Western’ IR Community: A Friendly Reply to David Lake’s “White Man’s IR”, PS: Political Science and Politics, 2019 Find more
“Beyond ‘the West/non-West Divide’ in IR”, The Chinese Journal of International Politics, 2018 Find more
“Why and How Should We Go for a Multicausal Analysis in the Study of Foreign Policy?: (Meta-) theoretical Rationales and Methodological Rules,”, Review of International Studies, 2012 Find more
“Getting Asia Right and Advancing the field of IR,”, Political Studies Review, 2013 Find more

“Constructivism: National Identity and Foreign Policy” in Sage Handbook of Asian Foreign Policy, edited by Takashi Inoguchi (Sage, 2019) Find more
What is at Stake in Building “Non-Western" IR Theory? (Routledge, 2018) Find more
Pluralism and Engagement in the Discipline of International Relations (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016). Find more
Regionalizing Global Crises: The Financial Crisis and New Frontiers in Regional Governance, co-edited with Toni Haastrup (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014). Find more
 
 

  Go! Hanyang WIKI : http://wiki.hanyang.ac.kr/Yong-Soo_Eun

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