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2020-06 29

[Alumni]A Crossover of Traditional and Contemporary Music

Traditional music in Korea is called gugak, which literally means “national music” in Korean. However, as the trends of Western music have been sweeping the music industry for more than half a century, most Koreans feel a sense of distance from traditional music. Ha Yun-ju (Department of Korean Traditional Music, '09) is a Jeongga (a kind of gugak which involves vocal singing) singer who is trying to popularize traditional music through a musical crossover with Western music. Ha Yun-ju (Department of Korean Traditional Music, '09) is a Jeongga singer who is trying to popularize the traditional music of Korea through a crossover with contemporary music. (Photo courtesy of Ha) Ha explained Jeongga as a genre that engrafts music and literature which used to be enjoyed by the upper-classes. “Jeongga reveals a taste for the arts as it leads to inner peace from its slow and steady melody,” said Ha. She added that Jeongga provides a mystic experience by filling in the emptiness of people with lyrical and instructive messages. After entering Hanyang with a full scholarship, Ha started to lay the foundation for her competence as a musician. “Each lesson with the professors helped me grow to be able to meet the standards to survive in the actual field,” said Ha. With the professors’ support as well as her efforts, Ha won the Gold Prize in the 27th Onnara Gugak Competition. However, Ha aspires to more than just mastering Jeongga. She is especially interested in familiarizing other people with this beautiful traditional music. Ha chose a crossover between traditional music and contemporary music as the medium. Upon receiving the KBS Gugak Award in 2018, Ha released her first full-length studio album, Chuseon, which means “a fan in autumn." The album featured contemporary songs sung in the style of Jeongga, expressing the loneliness of a woman saying farewell to her loved one. In addition, Ha is participating in various collaborations with contemporary pop musicians including Kim Junsu, Song So-hee, and Second Moon. Ha feels that she has been tasked with certain responsibilities as a traditional musician, and the crossover is a way of fulfilling them. Chuseon is Ha's first full-length studio album which expresses the loneliness of a woman saying farewell to her loved one. (Photo courtesy of Ha) Other than the crossover, Ha has been involved in diverse projects to popularize traditional music. The Jeongga singer recently released a collection of children's songs after appearing in Who Is Good at This, a singing contest program for children. Ha is preparing to release another full-length album, The Point of Ecstasy, with the poems of Na Tae-ju. Ha also plans to participate in a singing competition program by MBN as a representative of traditional music. “With my music, I am trying to touch the emotions that all Koreans unconsciously carry in their minds,” said Ha. Ha told the members of Hanyang to keep their passion and believe in what they are aiming for. “What you believe is what opens your way to the opportunities,” said Ha. “Even when you feel exhausted, don’t give up and do your best.” Oh Kyu-jin alex684@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-12 15

[Faculty]The Expedition to Living Knowledge

Mark Twain said that every person is a book, each year a chapter. People seek the meaning of life through their experiences. Here is Professor You Yeong-mahn (Department of Educational Technology), a knowledge ecologist who integrates people's experiences into new knowledge. Professor You Yeong-mahn (Department of Educational Technology) is a knowledge ecologist who integrates people's experiences into new knowledge. Communicating with the public You is well-known for his active communication with the public. You featured intermittently in television programs such as tvN’s No Way I’m an Adult and CBS’s Sebasi Talk. You delivers simple but permeating messages – such as tree (namu) does not blame (namurada) anyone. “There is a big difference between the role of a university lecturer and a public speaker,” said You. “The message should be concise and thought-provoking towards the public.” Knowledge ecology labels the general public as an agent of knowledge management. You's exposure to mass media is deeply related to knowledge ecology. You has published 88 books that meet the public interest. Besides, You posts a series of articles through social media where he interacts with his subscribers. You recently published Do Not Meet Someone Like This, which builds on his posts on Brunch, an SNS platform. It is a book that covers human relations. “What determines who I am is who I meet,” said You. “People should reflect on themselves before judging others.” You advises people to look back on themselves through Do Not Meet Someone Like This. (Photo courtesy of Namusaenggak) Curved rather than being straightforward You recalled his astonishment upon reading the comments on an article introducing Do Not Meet Someone Like This. “Some expressed mere anger and hostility without even reading the book,” said You. “What I found was a heartless atmosphere in society.” You referred to modern society as ‘straightforward,’ where you are faced with fierce competition. “People are demanded to aim further, work harder, and achieve faster,” explained You. “All that remains is emptiness.” You criticized current social conditions by citing Antoni Gaudi’s words, "The straight line belongs to men, the curved one to God." The knowledge ecologist proposed ‘curved’ values such as – diversity, harmony, and flexibility – as an alternative social discourse. “Curved values are enlightened through experience,” said You. The professor defined them as wisdom accumulated from continuous trial and error. They provide solutions to hardship with insights that hit the bull's-eye. Yoo suggested 'curved' values of – diversity, harmony, and flexibility – as an alternative to 'straightforward' social discourse. Experience as the source of creativity You recounted how his experiences led to creativity. “I helped my parents as a farmer, worked as a welder, and read books as a student,” said the knowledge ecologist. You said his experiences converged into a database. Along with extensive reading, it became a source of his unique content. You encouraged students of Hanyang to compile their database. “You need language to visualize what you think,” advised You. “There is no sense if you are in the absence of vocabulary.” The professor suggested that students read and behave. “Reading is rather physical labor than mental labor,” said You. “In order to master what you read, experience and reading should be done at the same time.” You highlighted the importance of experience as well as reading books. Some people say that a concept without experience is vain, and a thoughtless experience is dangerous. You is exploring the ecosystem of knowledge through his experience and interaction with the public. Oh Kyu-jin alex684@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Ju-eun

2019-11 25

[Faculty]Illuminating Dasan, an Innovative Thinker of the Joseon Dynasty

Dasan Jeong Yak-yong is considered one of the greatest thinkers in the late Joseon dynasty. Dasan -- a scholar and politician throughout the late 18th and early 19th century -- is well known for his pragmatic approach towards Confucianism, publishing highly influential works on philosophy, science, and theories of government. Illustrating Dasan's work is Professor Jung Min (Department of Korean Language and Literature), a scholar who has devoted his career to illuminate the values of Dasan and his publications. Professor Jung Min (Department of Korean Language and Literature) explores through the values of Dasan Jeong Yak-yong, one of the greatest thinkers of the Joseon dynasty. Jung recently completed publishing his series of Dasan Dokbon in Hankook Ilbo, which is a critical biography that takes a glimpse into Dasan's unknown life. “The articles cast light upon Dasan’s early years as a politician,” said Jung. “It was an age of turbulence following the breakdown of dominating Neo-Confucian values.” Jung portrayed Dasan as an ambitious intellectual who actively sought a breakthrough in social issues. Fortunately, Dasan received political support from King Jeong-jo, the reformist monarch who ruled Joseon in the late 18th century. Jung recently completed the Dasan Dokbon series and published it in book form. (Photo courtesy of Hankook Ilbo) Jung paid attention to Dasan’s approach to Catholicism throughout Dasan Dokbon. Unlike some scholars who see Dasan as a devout Catholic in his youth, Jung interpreted that Dasan regarded Catholicism as a field of study rather than a religion. “Dasan was deeply interested in the promotion of public welfare through science,” said Jung. “This is why he embraced Catholicism as a major ideological foundation of Western science.” Ironically, Catholicism is what forced Dasan out of his position, as it was counted as heresy by the ones with vested rights. Dasan was involved in the Catholic Persecution of 1801, and it ended his political career. Dasan was exiled to Gangjin, where he concentrated on his publications for 19 years. Jung plans to cover Dasan’s years of banishment through his further works. Jung claims that Dasan’s management of information will give out new insights to people living in modern society. “There is no Korean scholar who can surpass Dasan in the quantitative and qualitative richness in publications,” said Jung. “Dasan offered a new mechanism of processing voluminous information which is co-operated with his pupils.” Jung stated that Dasan’s competence as a data compiler will provide templates to which are required in the era of big data and collective intelligence. Jung sheds light on Dasan's role as a data compiler in his 19-year-banishment at Gangjin. Jung highlighted the importance of changing perspective. “Stereotypes prevent the emergence of new thoughts and ideas,” said Jung. “I tried not to confine myself to the traditional view on Dasan.” Jung’s humanistic insights to find connections with the society produced innovative results in his Dasan studies. As some people say, you can expect no influence if you are not susceptible to influence. Oh Kyu-jin alex684@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Ju-eun