Total 288Articles
News list
Content Forum List
2020-06 23

[Performance]Four Graduates of Hanyang University are Amongst the 70 New Law School Prosecutors for 2020

Among the 70 new prosecutors in 2020, four were undergraduate students from Hanyang University, placing Hanyang as the sixth-highest among other Korean universities, and five were graduate students from Hanyang University’s School of Law, the fifth-highest amongst other domestic law schools. On May 11th, the Ministry of Justice newly appointed 70 people who passed the 9th bar exam from the School of Law as prosecutors. This year marks the first time that more than 70 law school graduates-turned prosecutors have been newly appointed since 2012 when 42 people passed the first bar exam. This is due to the sharp decrease in the number of graduates from the Judicial Research and Training Institute. According to The Law Journal on the 18th, which published an analysis regarding the newly picked prosecutors, Seoul National University and Yonsei University had the largest number with 13, followed by Korea University with 12. Sungkyunkwan University and Ewha Woman's University were tied at 4th with five students each. Hanyang University and Sogang University tied for sixth with four students each. Also, after analyzing the newly appointed prosecutors coming from law schools, Pusan National University’s School of Law topped the list with nine students. Pusan National University’s School of Law ranked ninth with only two students last year but jumped to first place this year. Korea University’s School of Law (8 students) and Sungkyunkwan University’s School of Law (7 students) took the top three spots. Hanyang University’s School of Law had only three students appointed last year, but as the number increased to five this year, it rose to a joint fifth place with Kyung Hee University’s School of Law. Out of the 70 newly hired prosecutors, 41 (58.6%) were women, a sharp increase from last year (38.1%, 21 people). By age group, those who were in the 30-31 year-old group accounted for the largest portion with 27.1%, followed by the 28-29 year-old group with 25.6%, and the 32-33 year-old group with 15.7%. There were 22 (31.4%) prosecutors that majored in law for their undergraduate degree, while more than 60% were non-law majors. On the other hand, the Ministry of Justice announced that it had selected qualified candidates based on the results of personality tests, third-phase competency evaluations, and organizational competency evaluations in order to verify the candidates' in-depth public ethics, ethical awareness, balanced perspective and human rights awareness through document screening and working-level records in order to verify their academic performance and professionalism. The newly appointed prosecutors will receive intensive and substantial training such as but not limited to theory and practice of criminal law, prosecution investigation, lectures on investigative techniques, evaluation of working records, ethics education specifically for prosecutors, and working-level settlement of the frontline office (2 months), and will then carry out their duties as prosecutors. Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Lee Jung-joo

2020-06 23

[Student]ERICA Orchestra "Angelus" with Sounds from the Heavens

"Let's explore ANGELUS, a group of ERICA students that love music more than any others."  Q. What kind of a group is ANGELUS? A. ANGELUS means The Sound of the Heavens. It is an inter-university amateur orchestra under the Office of Student Affairs, where students who love music are gathered. Place of birth, age, gender, and living environments of the students are different, but they are still becoming one in the name of music, creating one beautiful voice.  Q. If it's an orchestra, it seems that the major activities would be playing instruments. Is that correct? A. There are annual concerts held every March and September for outdoor activities. There are other small activities meant to build friendships among the students, such as a founding celebration and other small concerts. Moreover, the ANGELUS orchestra is closely connected with other universities. To help the concerts of other universities, we participate in others' concerts as guest members and also invite guest members from other schools as well. Other than that, we also participate actively in events such as support concerts for the Office of Student Affairs, the Ansan Flashmob Concert, tutoring the Haeyang Middle School Orchestra, and other events within the school.  Q. How is ANGELUS constructed? A. There is an executive branch that takes care of overall administration work. Orche-group takes care of orchestra activities, and acts an advisory group that seeks to help or take on the role of middle man for a better operation of the orchestra. The executive branch mainly deals with administrative work, concerts and events, accounting, and student management. Orche-group is composed of section leaders that aim to make the best ensembles by directing the ensembles, delivering music scores, and taking care of each member's part. The instruments can be changed according to the members, but generally, in the string section there are violins, violas, cellos, contrabasses, and in the woodwind section there are flutes, clarinets, oboes, trumpets, trombones, and horns. Q. Since it is a group playing instruments, do you need to have basic playing skills? A. More than the skills of playing the instruments, the desire to play the instruments is more vital. Some people even started reading musical notes for the first time in their lives after entering ANGELUS. But they were full of passion for learning how to play the instruments, and all members gave great help. In the end, we were able to create beautiful sounds together. Q. How do you prepare for concerts? A. Dividing the year into two parts, we select which songs to play at a meeting. Usually, we select 1 or 2 overtures and a concerto to play in the first half of the concert select a symphony for the second half, and choose an encore song for the end of the concert. Taking the last concert as an example, we prepared Beethoven's Coriolan Overture and Mendelssohn's Final's Cave for the first half, and Beethoven: Symphony No. 7 for the second half. For the encore song, we prepared James Bond 007 in an orchestra version. Once the songs are selected, we start the ensemble. It is usually done once a week, about two and a half hours to three hours, excluding two weeks during exam periods. Once vacation starts after the semester ends, we start focusing more on the ensemble. The director comes every week to lead the ensemble, and we increase the number of practices to twice a week. Once the semester starts again, we practice almost daily, or every other day, to prepare for the upcoming concert. We usually hold the concert within two or three weeks of the start of the semester. Q. When does ANGELUS recruit new members? A. We are not able to have active events due to COVID-19 for now, but we are always recruiting members. Usually, registration can be done by contacting the president or vice-president, or through the Facebook page. It is also okay to visit the orchestra room directly. Also, we open a recruitment booth every March and September, so please visit if you have any interest. Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Lee Won-young

2020-06 16

[General][On-the-Spot] Final Exams and Social Distancing

While putting in a significant amount of effort to prevent the spread of COVID-19, the university is following prevention guidelines to ensure that final exams at the university run smoothly. On June 15th, many students took their final exams that were administered according to the designated health precaution procedures at the Olympic Gymnasium. ▲ Individual students’ temperatures are being checked at the entrance to the exam room. ▲ A student is wiping his desk using wet wipes that have been distributed individually. ▲ Students partaking in taking the examination must individually write up and submit a Health Questionnaire. ▲ At the entrance of the exam room, there is a notice in regards to the examination guidelines such as temperature checks. ▲ The Olympic Gymnasium has desks arranged in compliance with social distancing guidelines. ▲ Final exams are underway at the Olympic Gymnasium. ▲ Many students are taking their final exams at the Olympic Gymnasium. ▲ A student is taking his exam while the distance between him and the other desks are secured according to social distancing guidelines. ▲ Final exams are being conducted at the Olympic Gymnasium by maintaining a safe distance between the students. ▲ Students taking final exams at the Olympic Gymnasium Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Lee Jung-joo

2020-06 11

[Performance]Hanyang University Rises 4 Places to Rank 146th in 2021 QS World University Rankings

The United Kingdom’s global university ranking organization Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) announced the results of the 2021 World University Rankings on June 10. Hanyang University went up 4 places to 146th and continued its upward trend for the 10th year in a row. The world rankings were topped by the MIT in the United States with Stanford University and Harvard University following behind. In Korea, the ranking order was Seoul National University (37th), KAIST (39th), Korea University (69th), POSTECH (77th), Yonsei University (85th), Suungkyunkwan University (88th), Hanyang University (146th), Kyunghee University (236th), Gist University (295th), Ewha Womans University (393rd), Chung-Ang University (456th), Dongguk University (456th), Catholic University of Korea (456th), and Sogang University (456th), and 13 out of 15 universities climbed their rank compared to previous year. ▲ QS World University Rankings Hanyang University result page (photo by official website) Hanyang University fell from 339th in 2009 to 354th in 2010 but has continued its upward trend by rising to 314th in 2011. Compared to 10 years ago (2010), the figure has risen by 200 ranks. Hanyang's ranking in Korea has been the same for 4 years at 7th place. The evaluation criteria consists of a total of six indexes, and the ratio of the graduates’ reputation and student numbers were high in the 70s, but other indicators were relatively lower than the total score. See content in [[Hanyang Wiki]] hyu.wiki/QS세계대학평가 Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Park Gyeong-min

2020-06 10

[Special][Photo] Campus Mail Sends Hearts Despite COVID-19

Hanyang University Seoul Campus Post Office sends mail twice a day. Post office trucks load packages every afternoon at 1:30 and at 6 o'clock in the evening. Including both registered post and general post, around 200 packages are delivered with each shipment. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, Hanyangian's hearts were delivered on June 4th. ▲ A post office truck is parked in front of Hanyang University Seoul Campus Post Office to load packages on June 4th. ▲ The post office truck driver is loading packages onto the truck. The clock tower reads 1:30 PM (Doesn't it read 1:40?). ▲ The post office employee is moving packages from the post office to the truck. ▲ The post office employee is heading back to the office after sending out the mail. ▲ Post office truck is leaving to deliver packages from Hanyang University Seoul Campus Post Office.

2020-06 09

[Faculty]Professor Yeh Sang-wook, Awarded for Climate Change Research

Professor Yeh Sang-wook, from the Department of Marine Sciences and Convergent Technology at the ERICA campus, awarded for 'Researcher of the Month' by Ministry of Science and ICT. The Ministry of Science and ICT and its Research Foundation stated that Professor Yeh received this award for identifying the cause behind the increase in tropical precipitation in the Pacific region due to the increase in carbon dioxide, and for providing the basis for the increase in meteorological and climate change. ▲ Professor Yeh Sang-wook (Source: Ministry of Science and ICT) Professor Yeh is a natural scientist who has been suggesting ways to solve future problems in regards to the climate by finding out the cause behind climate change and extensively studying meteorological changes, climate change, and how fine dust can affect the climate. He said that as the increase in carbon dioxide has had a great impact on global climate change, many researchers have been trying to figure out the impact of human activity on the global climate. Tropical precipitation is one of the topics that has long been studied in the field of earth science because it acts as an energy source for global air circulation. Professor Yeh suggested a new approach to the precipitation structure in tropical regions by predicting future climates in an atmosphere where the concentration of carbon dioxide has more than doubled since the period before the Industrial Revolution, through climate model experiments. The analysis showed that the precipitation levels in the western Pacific region had increased in all experiments with increased carbon dioxide concentration levels. Additionally, it has been identified that the Walker Circulation and the Hadley Circulation, which are the region’s major atmospheric circulations, are regulators that determine precipitation increase. He also presented to the climatological community that structural differences in atmospheric circulation must be considered to grasp the detailed changes of tropical climates during global warming, and published related findings from his research in the March 2019 issue of Nature Communications. Professor Yeh said, “This study is meaningful because it suggests that the Walker Circulation and the Hadley Circulation in the tropical region play the role of regulators in determining the detailed changes in the precipitation structure of the region due to the increase in regional carbon dioxide levels. We hope that this study will help us predict future changes in water circulation and abnormal meteorological/climate changes around the world.” Meanwhile, the Science and Technology Personnel of the Month Award was established to discover and reward those who have contributed to the development of science and technology in the way of excellent research findings, to boost scientists’ morale and to spread the scientific and technological mindset to the general public. The recipients of the award receive the Minister Award from the Ministry of Science and ICT and 10 million won in prize money. Visit [Hanyang Wiki] for more information: hyu.wiki/이달의_과학기술인상 , hyu.wiki/예상욱 ** The following is the full interview released by the Ministry of Science and ICT in a press release. Released in 2006, the documentary The Inconvenient Truth was enough to raise mankind’s awareness of global warming. Fourteen years after 2006, in the year 2020, the industries of the future promise a richer future for mankind with the Fourth Industrial Revolution, but the uncomfortable truth facing the global environment has not yet been resolved. Professor Yeh Sang-wook from Hanyang University stresses that “having an interest in environmental changes is the most important thing that one can and should do." He is a natural scientist who observes the earth’s mysterious natural environments and explores the characteristics of various meteorological/climate variabilities and the causes behind such phenomena. His research, which started with an investigation into the El Niño effect, has expanded to establish the correlation between the heatwave, which is South Korea’s unusual weather condition during the summer, oceanic variabilities which occur every 10 years or more, and also the correlation between fine dust and atmospheric circulation. Climate change is a global phenomenon and the most international field of research because it requires a comprehensive understanding of the global environmental system in which the oceans and the atmosphere interact and have an influence on each other. We met Professor Yeh Sang-wook, who works under the motto, “The most effective prescription begins with a definite diagnosis” by putting out his best effort to try to predict the global environment and climate’s future and to read changes to the global climate that may occur based on his climate model that helps him make assumptions under various scenarios. Congratulations on receiving the Science and Technology Personnel of the Month Award. - I feel like I am undeserving of this award. First of all, I would like to thank my fellow senior and junior researchers for giving me this opportunity to conduct good research together. I was able to get a lot of help and ideas by constantly interacting with my fellow researchers. Because of this, I was able to produce good results. I would also like to express my gratitude to the Korean Meteorological Society for recommending me to become the recipient of this month’s Science and Technology Personnel Award. The concentration levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere are increasing, which also has a significant impact on the El Niño effect and climate change. What made you interested in researching the El Niño effect and climate change? - The El Niño effect was the topic for my doctoral thesis and is still what I mainly focus on as my central research theme. During my Ph.D. program, I started to extensively research the El Niño effect as I conducted a climate prediction model study with an El Niño simulation. The El Niño is confined to the tropical central and eastern Pacific region, but its impact has reached a global scale. Therefore, it is essential to understand the El Niño effect to understand the various meteorological/climate variabilities around the world. Please introduce your major research on meteorological/climate changes. - To make it simple, my research is focused on understanding the characteristics of various meteorological/climate variabilities observed on Earth today and the causes behind such phenomena. The phenomena that I am interested in vary from the extreme summer weather observed in our country, the heatwave, to ocean variabilities that have been occurring for more than a decade. And I want to analyze and understand how these conditions will alter the future of climate change. Recently, you have identified the atmospheric circulation characteristics which regulate the tropical precipitation changes in the Pacific region due to the increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration levels, in other words, the regional changes in the two atmospheric circulation levels in the tropics are modulators that affect tropical precipitation. Please introduce the major parts of your research. - Tropical precipitation is an energy source that causes global meteorological/climate variability. So, understanding the changes in precipitation levels in the tropics, especially in the Pacific region, is the basis for understanding the global water circulation and various atmospheric-ocean systems. Through this study, we were able to find that with the increase in carbon dioxide concentrations, precipitation levels increase in the western Pacific region. Whether the carbon dioxide levels were doubled, tripled, or quadrupled, the precipitation levels in the Western Pacific region still increased. Additionally, the tropical region’s major atmospheric circulations, the Walker Circulation, and the Hadley Circulation were found to be the regulators that were responsible for determining the increase in precipitation levels. It is very important to understand future changes in precipitation levels in this region because precipitation in the Western Pacific Region of the tropics is a place that directly or indirectly affects water circulation or abnormal weather/climate in East Asia, including South Korea. You have analyzed and predicted changes in the atmosphere using various climate models. Please explain to us how one can study the changes in the atmospheric and marine environments, which are nature’s greatest phenomena. - The most essential tools for studying the changes in the atmospheric and marine environments are climate models. This is because we are unable to do any direct experiments on the atmosphere or the ocean that we encounter every day. Computer programs that reflect complex physical equations behind what governs such natural phenomena can help us predict atmospheric and oceanic motions. This computer program is a climate model. Through climate models, one can understand how the atmospheric and marine environments change by assuming various scenarios that may occur on Earth in the future. June 5th is World Environment Day. The importance of the oceans and the atmospheric environment is being emphasized worldwide. What do climate change researchers predict the future of Earth's climate will be like? Do you have anything that you want to suggest to the people of South Korea? - I can say for sure that if there is one topic that people should be concerned about in the future, climate change is exactly that. Imagine a scenario where the economy has boomed and great scientific discoveries have been made, and therefore human life has become richer. Even in such scenarios, if climate change occurs drastically, humans will not be able to survive. It’s easy to understand here about why we should be even more concerned about climate change than any other problem. Even if I don’t talk about my research findings, it is evident that the climate of our planet is changing fast and rapidly. Above all, I think the most important thing that we can do at this time is to pay attention to the changing environment. When every citizen pays constant attention to environmental problems, I think that policy can then be enforced and therefore encourage a change in everyone’s behavior. As climate change is a global phenomenon, it seems that there is a need for us to communicate and cooperate with researchers from around the world and that we need to pay attention to several research findings so that the results of our research on climate change can be reflected in the international community and social policies. - I think the most important task that needs to be done here is to understand the various phenomena that are currently happening around us and to identify the causes behind them. When the exact causes are identified, appropriate policies can then be established. Above all, climate change is a global phenomenon, so reasearch has to be an international effort. More than in any other field of study, in ours there is a more active collaboration amongst researchers from around the world. Before being appointed as a professor at Hanyang University, you worked as a Staff Weather Officer (SWO), a post-doctoral researcher at the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmospheric Studies (COLA) in the United States, and also as a researcher at a government-funded research institute. I think that such experiences would have been the basis for what strengthened your research competitiveness. - Yes, that is correct. During my time as an SWO, I learned what the actual demands of the military were, and from this, I learned that the most important subject of a research project should be the most realistic one. Through my post-doctoral research in the United States and my experience as a researcher at a government-funded research institute, I was able to think about the importance of joint research and the kind of research that South Korea needs. Along with creative research, you have also put a lot of effort into fostering great minds. As a researcher or teacher, what is the emphasis that you put on your students or the members at your lab? - Well, I’m not so sure. What I say to my students and lab members is quite common and ordinary. I just say, “Do your best.” I emphasize that they should always choose to give their best efforts, and not to become the best. Of course, it’s good to be the best, but not everyone can be the best. But everyone can try their best. When one makes their best efforts, they can be the best, and even if they don't become the best, they will still be able to live a life without any regrets. What is your usual attitude towards life as a researcher (your basic philosophy of life)? - The most important attitude that a researcher should have over everything else is to never lose interest. In particular, natural scientists who study the nature of the Earth should feel: ‘How mysterious and strange natural phenomena are!', and I think that having this kind of view and perspective towards any research would make it interesting to study any other subject. What is a challenge that you ultimately want to overcome in your research field? - My ultimate challenge seems to be to accurately predict the future. If we can predict the future changes in weather and climate conditions that we experience every day with some accuracy, we can then share such benefits globally. Please leave a word of advice to students who dream of becoming scientists in the future. - Science bears many interesting and mysterious fruits. Also, such fruits can give many people great benefits. If you’re dreaming of becoming a scientist, you first need to train yourself to be observant of those around you. Scientists must also have the eye to see the other side of phenomena. You can’t have such an eye automatically. You need to have a habit of constantly observing and looking at the phenomena that occur around you, especially those that occur in nature. This habit will help you grow into becoming a great scientist. Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Lee Jung-joo

2020-06 09

[General][On-the-spot] “Where Did All the Cars Go?” After the Opening of the Parking Gate

From the operation of the "Industrial Center Parking Gate" from June 1, there has been a noticeable drop in the numbers of vehicles on campus. Parked cars disappeared due to ordinary vehicles being virtually restricted from entering designated areas. Most of the parking has been relocated to parking lots built below the Track and Field, with signs set up at the existing parking areas that green areas or rest areas are to be created. In line with the launch of the underground parking lot at the Track and Field, the Property Management Team plans to strengthen ground-level parking management and create a pedestrian-centered, pleasant, and safe campus. ▲ Only authorized vehicles can enter the parking gate installed under the passageways between the Industrial Center and the Engineering Building 2. ▲ A vehicle is entering the parking lot installed underground beneath the Track and Field. The number of available parking spaces can be checked at the entrance. ▲ The view of the parking lot in front of the Industrial Center (Advanced Materials & Chemical Engineering Building) from the Amphitheater. ▲ The view of the parking lot in front of the Industrial Center from the Hanyang University Museum. No vehicles are parked. ▲ A green space construction notice is installed at the parking space in front of the Advanced Materials & Chemical Engineering Building. ▲ Flower pots are located instead of vehicles at the parking lot in front of the Information Technology / Bio Technology building. ▲ A green space construction notice is installed at the parking space in front of the Information Technology / Bio Technology. ▲ General vehicles cannot be seen even in the Graduate School parking lot. ▲ Vehicles usually parked along the back road of the Paiknam Academic Information Center & Library cannot be seen, and instead flower pots are placed. ▲ Parked vehicles cannot be seen in front of the College of Education either. Parking is not possible due to the placement of flower pots. Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Park Gyeong-min

2020-06 09

[Performance]Hanyang University Ranks 38th in the 2020 THE Asia University Evaluation and 2nd in Korea in International Reputation

On June 3, the results of the Asian University Assessment, organized by Times Higher Education (THE), were released. Hanyang University moved down five steps to 38th. With Tsinghua University of China ranked 1st in the overall Asian rankings, Seoul National University ranked the highest among Korean universities at 9th. Hanyang University had shown a gradual increase annually from 74th place in 2013 to 33rd place in 2019, but unfortunately it dropped five levels down to 38th in the 2020 evaluation. The total score was down 0.2 points compared to last year. However, among the five evaluation indexes, the industry-academic cooperation income and international reputation index rose 6.2 points and 2.5 points respectively, while the international reputation ranked 2nd among domestic universities. The paper citation counts were reduced by four points, bringing disappointing results. Meanwhile, 489 universities from 30 Asian countries participated in the 2020 THE Asia University Assessment, and 5 categories and 13 detailed indicators were used, including 30 percent for the paper citation counts, 30 percent for research, 25 percent for education conditions, 7.5 percent for internationalization, and 7.5 percent for profits from industry-academic cooperation. View at [Hanyang Wiki] https://hyu.wiki/THE아시아대학평가 Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Park Gyeong-min

2020-06 01

[Performance]Hyundai Management Announces Hanyang University Ranks 4th Among Universities with the Top 100 CEOs in 2020

According to a survey taken on May 20 of 127 CEOs of the top 100 companies in sales by Hyundai Management, a management journal, the number of CEOs from Hanyang University was the fourth largest. The average age of the top 100 CEOs in Korea is 59. The average length of time a CEO serves in a company is 26.5 years, with it taking 20.7 years to become a CEO. The average year was 23 until 2018, but it decreased to 21.7 last year, and went down another year this year. The average tenure of CEOs is also in decline, with 29.8 years in 2017, 29.6 years in 2018, 27.4 years in 2019, and 26.5 years in 2020. Hanyang University ranked fourth with 6.3% of the CEOs. Seoul National University ranked highest with 26%, followed by Korea University (15.7%), and Yonsei University (14.2%). Additionally, the commercial economy sector (45.2%) and social sciences sector (6.5%) were higher than the natural sciences and engineering sector (41.1%). Last year’s ratio was also higher in the commercial economy sector than the natural sciences and engineering sector by 9.8%, thus the gap widened. This reflects a trend that businesses are focusing more on management rationalization rather than technology development. Meanwhile, according to the Economist report on May 25 of 134 CEOs of the top 100 companies, CEOs from Hanyang University were the fifth largest with eight people. Seoul National University ranked first with 21.6%, followed by Korea University (11.9%), and Yonsei University (9%). Sungkyunkwan University ranked fourth with nine people (6.7%), which was a slight increase from the Hyundai Management report (3.8%). Those in their 50s and 60s accounted for 76.3% of the total. There were 10 people over 70s, and nine people in their 30s~40s, which was smaller than the number of people in over 70s. By major, 32 people graduated from the Department of Business Administration, accounting for a quarter of the total. The total number of graduates of business-related majors such as commercial science and accounting is 37 people. Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Park Gyeong-min

2020-06 01 Important News

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Standing at the Center of Cutting-Edge Technology

Although there have been notable advances in the study of natural science, research related to high pressure has not been active in Korea due to the lack of groundwork technology. Professor Kim Jaeyong (Department of Physics) is opening up the route to high pressure research through the HYU-HPSTAR-CIS High Pressure Research Center, the hub of collaboration between the world-class institutes. Professor Kim Jaeyong (Department of Physics) is paving the way for high pressure research in Korea. The HYU-HPSTAR-CIS High Pressure Research Center was established in 2016 with support from The Ministry of Science and ICT. The research center is in a collaborative relationship with the Carnegie Institution for Science (CIS) of the United States and the Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR) of China. The three institutes are consistently sharing their research outcomes by holding joint symposiums and reinforcing researcher exchanges. Kim explained the collaboration as “a successful case of acquiring advanced technologies by bringing in world-class institutes,” referring to the research spirit of the center as “Moon Ik-jeom spirit.” Moon is a historical figure who brought cottonseed from China into Korea, allowing the country to produce and distribute cotton to citizens. Just as Moon did in the past, Kim attained three diamond anvil cells, high pressure devices that enable the compression of a small piece of material with extreme pressure, from HPSTAR in 2016. Within a short period, Kim succeeded in producing a unique version of the cell. The center’s main focus is on hydrogen energy storage. The have recently reported successful results in the reversible storage of hydrogen energy. By imposing high pressure in Ti-Zr-Ni Quasicrystals, the research team was able to keep 4.2 wt of hydrogen at room temperature. Kim hopes that the results will contribute to the commercialization of hydrogen-powered cars. Kim hopes to contribute to the commercialization of hydrogen-powered cars with his recent research. Kim has demonstrated his will to help position the HYU-HPSTAR-CIS High Pressure Research Center as the hub of high pressure research. Kim also encouraged more students to participate in the research. “Our university has sufficient human resources, research conditions, and support systems to conduct the research,” said the professor. “I hope the students can feel the sense of thrill that comes from standing at the center of cutting-edge technology.” Oh Kyu-jin alex684@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-06 01

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Effective Use of Photocatalysts to Combat Environmental Problems

Numerous attempts have been made by engineers to apply technology to our everyday problems. Professor Park Jae-woo (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering) tackles one of the most critical problems of our time, environmental pollution, using the special characteristics of nano photocatalysts. His research focuses on resolving the problems caused during the reduction-oxidation process of photocatalysts. Through his research, he has discovered that the use of the Charge Transfer Layer (CTL) is significantly effective, and expects the findings to help organic pollutants decompose through photocatalysts, which will lead to a cleaner society. For the past 15 years, Park has been conducting research on the development of magnetic-cored dendrimers and nano-photocatalysts for the purpose of environmental purification. According to Park, nano-photocatalysts have the power to commence oxidation in hazardous substances by separating electrons from holes. This process of oxidation converts substances into water and carbon dioxide gas, which are harmless to the environment. However, despite their striking capabilities, photocatalysts have their shortcomings. In his research, Park focused on compromising with the photocatalysts' technical problem. For the past 15 years, Professor Park Jae-woo (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering) has been conducting research on the development of nano-photocatalysts for the purpose of environmental purification. The problem with the use of photocatalysts One of the biggest disadvantages of using the reduction-oxidation of photocatalysts is that electrons have the tendency to return to their respective electron holes. Their tendency to recombine after separation lowered the rate at which photocatalysts oxidized harmful substances, and many researchers have sought out ways to prevent the recombination of electrons with the electron holes. The existing methods such as doping, facet, and core-shell merely slow down the rate at which electrons recombine with electron holes and fail to completely separate them. However, Park has succeeded in permanently separating the electrons using the CTL. How was CTL used? A photocatalyst which utilizes the CTL is comprised of three components: the photocatalyst which forms a pair of electrons and electron holes, the CTL which moves the electrons selectively, and the collector which accumulates and stores the moved electrons. Here, the CTL, being the main component, carries the electrons while inhibiting their passage through electron holes. As a result, the electron is moved from the photocatalyst to the electron collector, and suppresses them from recombining. What makes Park and his team’s accomplishment so unique is the fact that their work did not stop at only delaying the recombination, as previous methods had done, but also entirely prevented recombination by separating the electrons and shutting down the reverse-travelling by maintaining a high level of catalyst reaction. The result of the research “We have conducted two experiments to prove there is an increased activation of catalysts by using the CTL in the mentioned study,” said Park. He continued, “The first, is hydrolysis. A catalyst under the influence of the CTL displayed 78% higher hydrogenative yield than the existing one in the visible ray photography. Then, in the experiment with the subject bisphenol A, which is an organic pollutant, the catalyst showed a very high 93% removal rate after three hours of reaction." Park also believes that catalysts utilizing the CTL can be applied to energy and environment-related fields in an extensive range. Park said, “I want to thank my graduate school students, whose effort and sweat have made all this possible.” Park expressed gratitude to his graduate school students, whose effort and hard work have made the project possible. “It motivates me to reflect on my mindset when I see students working so hard on the research topic.” He especially thanked Hassan Anwer (Civil and Environmental Engineering, Doctoral program) for his devotion to the research. Lee Yoon-seo cipcd0909@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-05 27

[General]ERICA Volunteer Corps Changes its Volunteer Program to an Online Volunteering Program

On May 14th, ERICA campus’ Volunteer Corps announced that it would completely replace its offline community service activities with online lectures, due to the current COVID-19 situation. It has changed the existing requirement of 30 offline volunteer work hours to 15 online lectures (conducted for a total of 30 hours). The online lecture period runs from May 6th to June 21st, and students are required to complete this course within the volunteer work period, divided into three different classes. The first volunteer work period will be from May 6th to May 31st, the second from May 23rd to June 7th, and the third from June 8th to June 21st, and students must view all 5 contents in each class period that are 10 hours in total. After the students are finished taking the 15 online lectures, they must enter a volunteer service report of a designated length in a review format on the volunteer service system between May 18th and June 21st. For the community service lecture program (General Elective Course, 1 credit, P/F), a student must listen to both the courtesy training and the online volunteer lectures while also completing the volunteer activity report in order to earn the credit. The Volunteer Corps has stated that students should check the volunteer activity conditions closely to ensure they get all the credits they need. For more information, students can contact the Volunteer Corps through the phone (031-400-4342) or by e-mail (vol@hanyang.ac.kr). ▲출처: Source: Volunteer Corps, ERICA Campus ▶ERICA 사회봉사단 홈페이지 바로가기 Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Lee Jung-joo