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2019-08 12

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Lengthening the Service Lifespan of Building Structures

The paradigm of architecture is changing. The construction market used to focus on efficiency and speed, but the modern era values structures with high durability and long lifespans. Professor Lee Han-seung (Major in Architectural Engineering) developed the Durability Health Monitoring System, which collects information on the state of the corrosion of iron and whether chlorine ion and carbon dioxide have penetrated through a sensor installed inside concrete structures. This is groundbreaking technology that was published in the prestigious science journal Advanced Materials on April 15th, 2019, titled "A Colorimetric Multifunctional Sensing Method for Structural-Durability-Health Monitoring Systems." Professor Lee Han-seung (Major in Architectural Engineering) was featured in HY-ERICA magazine's 2019 summer edition, and he also received the 2019 HYU Academic Award. Lee majored in architecture materials and construction in the department of Architectural Engineering, and his main research interest is concrete materials. He is the director of the Innovative Durable Building and Infrastructure Research Center, created as part of the Engineering Research Center (ERC) business to develop material, construction, monitoring, and maintenance technology to enhance the durability of structures. Fourteen professors from eight universities are working together to focus on their research into four major topics: durability diagnosis monitoring sensors, durability design, protection and repair construction methods, and a maintenance and asset value comprehensive evaluation system. Concrete, which is most often the preferred material in construction projects, deteriorates when it comes into contact with chlorine ion or when the substance gradually permeates through the hardened surface. In a ferroconcrete structure, the iron will rust once chlorine ion infiltrates. And once chlorine ion pervades, the iron expands, and the concrete is destroyed. This phenomenon equals the end of the lifespan of the concrete structure. Lee wanted to be able to gauge how much chlorine ion has penetrated a structure, which would require monitoring technology with a sensor. His research team developed the Durability Health Monitoring System, which tells through wireless communication modules whether iron is corroded or chlorine ion and carbon dioxide have seeped through. A thin film type sensor is buried in the concrete infrastructure beforehand, in order to activate the durability monitoring system. The infiltration of carbon dioxide and chlorine ion inside a concrete structure is a tantalizing the problem, but Lee developed a sensor using optics. His solution was to prevent it from reaching the iron inside the concrete, through the use of the Durability Health Monitoring System. Structures built 30 to 40 years ago need to have their durability diagnosed and maintenance needs assessed, just as humans are obligated to undergo health check-ups at similar ages. There are two ways of monitoring a structure's health. One is to execute structural heath monitoring, in the way a seismometer warns of the danger of earthquake through vibrations. Another is to increase usage by making it convenient to use its waterproof system, air conditioning and heating, electricity and more. “My final goal is to extend the service lifespan of building structures to 200 years," said Lee, with a confident smile. Lee emphasized the importance of fusion research and incorporating Fourth Industrial Revolution technology with architectural engineering. He applied optical science when he put sensors on optical fibers to recognize the intensity when either carbon dioxide or chlorine ion has entered, in real time, by looking at the change of colors. “Securing durability is also eco-friendly," said Lee, when pointing out that long lifespans of structures decreases co2 and prevents the exhaustion of resources. He stressed that a structure that can stand longer is more beneficial financially, and in the life cycle perspective. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-08 07

[Special][Card news] Korean Fan Dance Performed by Foreign Students

▲ 카드뉴스의 한글 기사는 아래에서 읽을 수 있습니다 국제 여름학교 학생들, “한국 전통 부채춤 수업 너무 재밌어요” ▲ Click to read the English article Korean Traditional Fan Dance Performed by Foreign Students

2019-08 06

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Development of Organic Semiconductor Gel for High-Resolution Organic Electronics

Organic semiconductor gel was first developed by Professor Kim Do Hwan (Department of Chemical Engineering) and his research team that opened doors to the dramatic performance enhancement of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) devices. His paper “Universal Route to Impart Orthogonality to Polymer Semiconductors for Sub-Micrometer Tandem Electronics” was published in the world-famous journal Advanced Materials as the cover acticle in July. Professor Kim Do Hwan (Department of Chemical Engineering) explained in detail the organic semiconductor gel, the keyword from his research. Among existing semiconductors, silicon semiconductors are used representatively in many facets of the semiconductor and display industries. However, silicon is too brittle and requires expensive processing such as vacuum deposition. In 1977, Alan J. Heeger, Alan G. MacDiarmid, and Hideki Shirakawa found the first organic semiconductor made of carbon and hydrogen, uncovering the first organic matter that electricity flows through. In this sense, organic semiconductors were in the spotlight as the next generation of semiconductors, but they still could not substitute silicon semiconductors which allowed electricity to pass through at high speeds. That was, until about five years ago when high-performance organic semiconductors were created, enabling the speed of electricity transfer to become comparable to that of silicon semiconductors. However, another problem emerged as existing organic semiconductors could not adopt successive solutions and photolithography processes simultaneously, because organic semiconductors may dissolve or become damaged during patterning processes. Here, photolithography refers to the semiconductor patterning technology which uses UV light as in the process of silicon semiconductors. Kim and his research team investigated how organic semiconductors could keep the established solution processing, while maintaining the optoelectronic performance, as well as adopt the patterning process of silicon called photolithography. Ultra-High Definition (UHD) OLED microdisplay with a hyper-resistant organic semiconductor gel basis to realize AR or VR. (Photo courtesy ot Kim) They created organic semiconductor gel to apply a new conversion methodology that can be applicable to conventional photolithography processing as well as sequential solution processes while keeping the performance level of existing organic semiconductors. “Gel” refers to semi-Interpenetrating Diphasic Polymer Network (semi-IDPN), which is a three-dimensional, high-density, entangled structure between organic semiconductor and organosilica chains. Organosilica is a silica network that includes organic chains. Through the newly created organic semiconductor gel, the research team found that organic semiconductors can be made from sequential solution processing and patterned into desired sizes via photolithography. Kim (second from the left) and his research students who participated in this study. The results of this research are expected to widen the application of new technology into various organic optoelectronic devices such as organic image sensors and neuromorphic electrodes, as successive solution processing and photolithography processing are now applicable. “The performance of VR and AR devices that used to arouse giddiness and motion sickness due to low resolution is expected to advance drastically with the application of organic semiconductor gel,” said Kim. The virtual reality that we thought only possible in movies has now become closer than ever to real life, with ultrahigh-definition (UHD) OLED microdisplays and high-performance VR and AR devices coming alive with the development of organic semiconductor gel. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Ju-eun

2019-07 31

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Smarter Production of Shale Gas Using AI

In the previous era of oil and gas, conventional natural resources like coal were hard to find and costly to attain. In the search for an easily obtainable energy source, shale gas entered the limelight and has become an increasingly important natural gas since the early 21st century. In his recent study "Smart Management of Unconventional Oil and Gas Wells," Professor Sung Won-mo (Department of Earth Resources and Environmental Engineering) designed AI technology which manages a more efficient method of shale gas production. Professor Sung Won-mo (Department of Earth Resources and Environmental Engineering)'s recent study aims to develop an AI management technology for the most efficient production of shale gas. Natural gas is extracted through wells that are drilled two to three kilometers deep from the ground. The conventional production of gas was an extremely uneconomical procedure, primarily because the source of gas is concentrated within a very small area, thus being difficult to find. For instance, while extracting marine gas a kilometer under the sea costs more than 100 billion won, its success rate hovers at three percent. Shale gas (natural gas extracted from shale, which is a fine-grained, laminated sedimentary rock consisting of silt and clay-sized particles), on the other hand, is an unconventional energy source that tends to be found over a wide area, hence is much easier to locate. For this reason, shale gas has become a very important energy source. “Gas consumption will reach its peak in 2050. Until the end of the 21st century, securing the gas supply will be very important, and shale gas is a highly productive and cost-efficient energy source,” said Sung. Left is an image of a gas well. A conventional well is used for extracting conventional natural gas, and an unconventional well is used for shale gas. Right shows the various information that is gathered from a well. AI management technology will analyze the data to ensure the most efficient production of gas. (Photo courtesy of Sung) Sung’s research focuses on developing AI management technology for the most efficient production of shale gas. Attaching an AI sensor onto the well allows it to collect and analyze related data to ensure the most precise and efficient production procedure. “The data we collect from the sensor is so vast that it is impossible to be analyzed by humans or with a regular computer. However, AI learns from the information and analyzes the new data with impressive speed and accuracy,” explained Sung. The model will help predict the type of rock, type of gas, and components of gas according to the depth. As the result, more accurate drilling and product predictions will be possible, ultimately lowering the unit cost of gas. Sung said he has been aware of the prospect of shale gas for a long time and hopes that in the future, the new technology will help secure this gas resource for Korea. “Korea does not possess many natural resources and relies heavily on imports,” added Sung. “I hope this new technology can be developed further so that it can be implemented in policies, helping to secure this gas resource in Korea.” Lim Ji-woo il04131@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-07 31

[Media Briefing][Korea Biomedical Review] Publishing Pre-clinical Trial Results with GC Labcell

A research team led by Professor Yoon Chae-ok (Department of Bio Engineering) of Hanyang University jointly conducted research with GC Labcell and recently published the pre-clinical trial results for a natural killer (NK) cell treatment (MG4101) for pancreatic cancer. Considering that an accumulation of extracellular fluid limits the penetration of the treatment into tumors in the case of pancreatic cancer, MG4101 provides a successful outcome in that it efficiently penetrates the tumor and rapidly removes it through cell death and reduction of immunosuppressive factors. According to the director of GC Labcell, "This study has reaffirmed the possibility of NK cell therapy treating various types of cancer." Jeon Chae-yun global@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-07 26

[Special][Photo News] Parents Waiting for Children Taking Entrance Exams

On July 20th, the special admissions process of written examinations and interviews took place for foreign nationals and foreign students at Hanyang University Seoul campus. The students' parents waited for their children in the hot and humid weather in front of Engineering Building I, where the examination took place. ▲ The parents are checking the exam room numbers in front of the Engineering Builiding I, where the examinination took place. ▲ Parents are waiting under the shade of trees for the examination to end. The admissions process for 2020 has begun, along with the special admissions process for foreign nationals and foreign students. A total of 444 students applied for the foreign nationals and foreign students admission process, and 56 of students who graduated from foreign middle and high schools will be selected, resulting in a competition rate of 7.91 to 1. Moreover, an undecided number of students who attended elementary, middle, and high schools abroad as well as North Korean defectors will be selected. Translated by Jeon Chae-yun global@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-07 26

[Media Briefing][The Chosun Ilbo] Plant "Social Innovation DNA" in Universities

The Chosun Ilbo published an article on universities' social innovation education programs on July 9th. Social innovation education used to only be offered in master's and doctorate programs. Many institutes followed this course after the Social Entrepreneur Academy began at Sungkyunkwan University in 2010. Hanyang University triggered another change after establishing a social innovation major last year. Hanyang University has been operating the Social Innovation Convergence major as an undergraduate course since it was established last year. Hanyang is the first university in the nation to incorporate such a major into the undergraduate curriculum. Students may receive a social innovation degree as part of a multiple-major after completing 36 credits. The curriculum consists of ▲Social innovation basic theory ▲Social innovation capstone design (problem solving practice) ▲Changemaker action learning (term system field practice). First, the structure of basic theory is of learning the methodology first and then actualizing solutions in a community or social economic organization. Next, social innovation capstone design is a project course of experiencing the problems faced in practical business, and it usually consists of consulting in the field of social innovation or digital marketing class, in which social enterprises or social ventures are recruited as clients and students carry out the requested contents. Finally, changemaker action learning helps to expand the social innovation idea toward the global stage, going beyond national boundaries. Currently there are around 80 students in the Hanyang University social innovation convergence major. There were 20 students last year which was the first year of offering the major, but majoring students are increasing rapidly, with 40 students signing up during the first semester. <Article Link> http://news.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2019/07/08/2019070801527.html Translation by: Kim Hyun-soo

2019-07 23

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Precisely Investigating Catalytic Reactions

Professor Lee Sang-uck (Department of Chemical and Molecular Engineering) has recently developed a computer simulation methodology, also known as One Probe Non Surface green’s function (OPNS) to precisely understand the catalytic reaction of energy production storage using catalysts. In order to exchange existing catalysts that use rare-earth elements into ones that use cheaper carbon material, one must understand the catalyst reaction of carbon materials. Lee’s research and thesis titled “Unraveling the Controversy over a Catalytic Reaction Mechanism Using a New Theoretical Methodology: One Probe and Non-Equilibrium Surface Green's Function” contributed to developing a methodology of accurately interpreting catalyst reactions and to the development of a new and cheaper carbon catalyst. Professor Lee Sang-uck (Department of Chemical and Molecular Engineering) is explaining the logic of the One Probe Non Surface green’s function (OPNS) methodology. The first step of the research was to interpret the traits of catalysts in a particular material. He used the most prevalent methodology for interpretation, but was faced with a theological problem: while chemical reactions and catalyst reactions must accurately consider the flow of electrons, the widely used method does not give such considerations. For instance, the former would consider the reaction of the parallel state when it should interpret the reaction of a non-parallel state. Using the High Performance Computing server (HPC), which is a super computer with around 360 cores, it was possible to solve quantum mechanics that mathematized natural phenomena. Lee is pointing to the High Performance Computing servers (HPC) that were used for the research. Research typically consists of understanding a natural phenomenon and expresses the research results in the form of a formula. Through coding, natural phenomena can be simulated in a computer, and that enables researchers to interpret any phenomena. Lee specifically utilized quantum mechanics computer simulations to understand the conduct of electrons and atoms, thereby solving the problem of the existing methodology. Such computer simulations can be applied in semiconductor materials or energy materials. Computer simulations have the advantage of allowing simultaneous screenings using several computers when developing high performance matters. Lee and his team suggested a guideline to understanding and predicting the new property of matter, and developing a new matter after adopting a computer simulation technique to electrons and energy materials. This thesis in particular suggests a way to clearly establish the reaction mechanism to know how catalytic reactions occur when developing poles for solar cells. While previously it was impossible to perfectly reflect all experiment environments, Lee developed a new methodology that took into account most of the real experiment atmosphere and developed a definite catalytic reaction mechanism. Also, a way to attach electric fields in computer simulations for catalyst reactions with voltage was made possible through the new findings. A catalyst reaction is a chemical reaction, thus requiring electrons to move; however, no methodology was available that took into account the movement of electrons. This new methodology is one that can interpret chemical reactions, with respect to the flow of electrons. Lee was designated Researcher of the Month with the development of the OPNS methodology to precisely investigate catalytic reactions. “What we do is basic research for the future process of developing real things. There was a need to concretely understand what happens within the development of lithium batteries, solar cells, and fuel cells, which is why we strived to develop a methodology to accurately interpret such theories,” said Lee. He went on to emphasize the need for parallel effort in experiments and computer simulations in order to achieve innovations, and the use of a clear methodology to enhance data credibility. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-07 18

[Media Briefing][The JoongAng Ilbo] "'University’s Method of Passive Knowledge Transfer has Ended... Now is the Time to Integrate with Society"'

The JoongAng Ilbo published an interview with Hanyang University president Kim Woo-seung on July 2. President Kim said, “The old method of universities’ passing one way knowledge to students has come to an end, and students must be provided with more opportunities to thoroughly learn through experiences.” He went on to emphasize that, “All universities must realize that neither education nor research matters unless they are connected to society.” President Kim, who was inaugurated in February, helped Hanyang successfully achieve industry-academia cooperation as the dean of industry-academia cooperation at ERICA campus (Gyeonggi-do, Ansan-si) and introducing it as a major in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Industry-Coupled Problem-Based Learning (IC-PBL) is an innovative teaching method that he developed which reflects societal demands. During the class, students solve problems that a company or the local community has commissioned and receives feedback from the company. Regarding this method, President Kim said that “Opportunities for experiential learning are vital. We currently offer around 120 IC-PBL lectures but intend to expand the offerings.” In addition to this, President Kim plans to institute a class using the co-teaching method, which is a class run by 2 professors from different majors. President Kim said, “Co-teaching will foster students' ability to solve integrated and complex problems that actually exist in society.” President Kim anticipates that the activation of these research centers will alleviate some of the financial dificulties faced by local universities, including the freeze which has been on tuition fees for the past 11 years. He said, “Support from companies is needed as a rise in tuition fees is impossible without social consensus today.” He went on to say, “Just as soccer teams pay a transfer fee when signing Son Heung-min, I want companies who hire talented individuals fostered by the university to be more concerned with university education and to contribute to the process more.” <Article link> http://news.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2019/07/02/2019070200154.html Translation by: Kim Hyun-soo

2019-07 14

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Korea-Belgium Student Program for Semiconductors, 3D Printing, and Robotics

The Korea Institute for Advancement of Technology(KIAT) conducted the Innovation-Growth Global Talent Cultivation Enterprise this year. Hanyang University applied for the program and will receive support on conducting the Global Expert Education for Korea-Belgium Future Innovation. The enterprise enables a joint research project to develop semiconductor technology through the cooperation of Korea and Belgium. Professor Park Jin-goo (Department of Bionanotechnology) is the general manager, and Professor Kim Tae-gon (Division of Smart Convergence Engineering) is in charge of practical affairs. Recruitment announcement for Global Expert Education for Korea-Belgium Future Innovation. Six students will conduct research with IMEC on semiconductors (processor-in-memory), and seven students will join KU Leuven for research on 3D printing and robotics. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Through the enterprise, 13 master's and doctorate students of Hanyang will join Belgium's IMEC or KU Leuven for a minimum of 6 months to a maximum of 12 months. They will conduct joint research in three fields: semiconductors (specifically, processor-in-memory) at IMEC, and 3D printing and robotics at KU Leuven. Students may apply and will be chosen through a selection process. The application period is currently open, and the recruited students will be sent this December. The next applicants will be recruited this October and sent in January of 2020. Professor Kim Tae-gon (Division of Smart Convergence Engineering) explained that the program aims to foster talented Hanyang students to demonstrate their acquired ability at the many small but strong companies of Korea. Kim said, "During my 10 years working at IMEC, I felt that the cultivation of young talented workers was more important than anything." Kim also explained that the aim of the program is to nurture outstanding individuals who can help small but influential businesses in Korea. "I hope students acquire a lot of experience through this program and use their ability in Korea's 'small giant' companies." For this, Kim prepared a special curriculum with Park Systems. One out of thirteen students who complete the program will automatically be offered jobs at Park Systems after graduation. Kim says they plan to increase the number of participating companies in the future. Lim Ji-woo il04131@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Ju-eun