Total 140Articles
News list
Content Forum List
2019-10 16

[Admission ]Freshman Recruitment for the Department of Entrepreneurship

On October 15th, Hanyang University announced the freshman student recruitment for the Department of Entrepreneurship. The entrepreneurship master's degree course was established under the goal of cultivating talent with global start-up capacity and conducting start-up-related research. The curriculum includes four systematic and professional stages, including ▲entrepreneurship cultivation ▲capturing business opportunities and establishing business plans ▲start-up management, and ▲growth and return. It is also suitable for those who wish to have practical study or entrepreneurship research since professors have a professional background in business management, experience as KOSDAQ CEOs, directors of small businesses, and Ph.D holders in venture studies. For students with high grades, research funds are being provided. Students will also have the chance to explore start-up support programs in cooperation with the Hanyang University Startup Support Foundation. The Hanyang University Startup Support Foundation provides education, training, and global programs for start-up cultivation Through Uway Apply (http://www.uwayapply.com), students can submit the application form until the 17th of October. For more information, please visit the website of the Hanyang University Graduate School (http://www.grad.hanyang.ac.kr). ▲ A Recruitment Poster for the Department of Entrepreneurship Hanyang Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-10 14

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Technique to Improve Display Technology

In the modern world, people look, read, communicate, and even travel through the few-inch square screen. Thus, developing a better display technique has always been an aspired aim. Professor Kim Jaekyun's (Department of Photonics and Nanoelectronics) recent proposition for a better display technology with a ‘Programmable Non-Contact Assembly-based 5000ppi Micro LED Display’ suggests a new and better technology for the future of displays. Kim Jaekyun (Department of Photonics and Nanoelectronics), in his recent study proposition, suggested a better Micro LED transfer technology for the future of displays. Micro LED is an emerging display technology, consisting of an array of microscopic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) forming the individual color pixels. This particular LED is quickly becoming the “next big thing” for it outperforms, in many ways, the organic light-emitting diode (OLED), which is the current and dominant display technique used in most devices. Most importantly, Micro LED has much better energy efficiency. With the same amount of electricity, Micro LED emits light 1000 times brighter than OLED. This indicates that smaller, lesser, and more distantly arranged Micro LEDs will create the same smooth screen as the previous OLED. However, there is one big problem to solve before commercialization. For Micro LED, the Red-Green-Blue color pixels are manufactured separately, then directly transferred onto the display backplane. However, the current transfer technology, where each pixel is transferred one by one, is highly time-consuming and expensive. The result is an expensive product unfit for commercializing, such as Samsung’s new model of television, the Wall Professional, which costs up to 300 million won. A large Micro LED display in the Garosu-gil Apple store. Although the LEDs are arranged quite distantly in close view, the brighter light of Micro LED creates the illusion of a smooth surface from afar. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim proposed a technique that arranges the color pixels without any direct contact. First, the Micro LEDs dispersed in a solution will be spread on the backplane. As a result of the electric field from the sophisticatedly-designed backplane, the micro LEDs will automatically be arranged into correct position. The micro LED display made by this technique will be much cheaper, allowing a wide commercialization of the micro LED. Kim expects the technique to be implemented on all devices, including smartphones and TVs. He primarily expects its positive impact on the performance of AR glasses, which requires a small but bright display light as Micro LED. “The research will be difficult, but I have conviction that it will work,” said Kim. “When researching, one has to think less of ‘will it work?’ and more of ‘I need to make it work’; because in the end, somebody will. For the next three years, I’ll keep these words in mind and work my hardest to succeed in developing the new Micro LED technology.” Lim Ji-woo il04131@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-10 09

[Special]Celebrating the Promulgation of the Korean Alphabet

▲ Click to read the English article Celebrating the Promulgation of the Korean Alphabet

2019-10 06

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] A New Association Between Muscle and Metabolic Syndrome

According to the National Institution of Health (NIH), metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk factors that raises your risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes and stroke. As metabolic diseases become more prevalent over the past few decades, researchers have been working to figure out the underlying cause. Professor Jun Dae-won (College of Medicine) has made a breakthrough over this field by discovering its association with muscle health. Professor Jun Dae-won (College of Medicine) discovered the link between muscle and metabolic diseases. “As people get older, they tend to lose muscle mass. This increases the risk of falls, which might cause the death of the elderly,” said Jun. “However, most of the researchers did not acknowledge why muscular issues lead to the aggravation of metabolic diseases.” Jun’s team, in collaboration with Professor Kim Ji-young’s team, made progress on finding the links between muscle and metabolic syndrome. What caught Jun's eyes was psoas muscle, which is an internal muscle of the loin. Jun made use of this muscle, as it is widely known to be proportional to the total muscle mass. Jun collected 1000 PET-CT (Positron emission tomography–computed tomography) images on psoas muscle and kept an eye on glucose inside the muscle. Jun found out that Fluorine‐18‐labelled fluoro‐2‐deoxy‐d‐glucose (18F‐FDG) uptake of psoas muscle is a promising surrogate marker for existing and incipient metabolic derangement. Jun's team identified Fluorine‐18‐labelled fluoro‐2‐deoxy‐d‐glucose (18F‐FDG) uptake through PET-CT as it provides a clear picture of psoas muscle. (Photo courtesy of Jun) Jun admitted that he could not eliminate all confounding variables, despite endless efforts to minimize them. "There are limitations in clinical trials, as it is not easy to find action mechanisms through these tests. That is the reason why we went abreast with animal testing and cell experiment,” explained Jun. “There may be some hindrance in interpretation due to differences between human and laboratory animals. But they still provide clues to action mechanisms.” Thus, he stated his plans to work on the revalidation of the research, digging deeper into the degree of association. Jun underlined the need for continued endeavor, as it eventually pays off, in an unexpected way at times. Jun highlighted the importance of being industrious and strong-minded. “My original research intended to find the relation between liver function and metabolic syndrome,” said Jun. “Unfortunately, I could not draw meaningful results.” Jun was on the verge of giving up the research. It was his continuous subgroup analysis that led to eureka. Just as what people say, sometimes coincidence is a plan in disguise. Oh Kyu-jin alex684@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Ju-eun

2019-10 04

[Faculty]Professor Han Myung-hoon Receives the ‘2019 Asia Brain Tumor Society Symposium’ Education Foundation Award

▲Professor Han Myung-hoon Han Myung-hoon, a professor in the Department of Neurosurgery (Hanyang University Guri Hospital Neurosurgery) was awarded the ‘Den-Mei Brain Tumor Education Foundation’ award at the ‘2019 Asia Brain Tumor Society Symposium’ held in Taiwan on September 28th. The title of this presentation was ‘LGR5 and downstream intracellular signaling proteins which play critical roles in the cell proliferation of neuroblastoma, meningioma, and pituitary adenoma.’ The contents of the presentation included the discovery in the connection between Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (LGR5) and human neuroblastoma, intracranial meningioma, and pituitary tumors. In regards to the new findings, Professor Han said, “The possibility that LGR5, which is a receptor protein related to stem cells, could have a connection with the production and proliferation of human neuroblastoma, intracranial meningioma, and pituitary tumors was confirmed. Professor Han graduated from Hanyang University College of Medicine and acquired a master’s degree and Ph.D. at the corresponding graduate school. He is also actively engaged in societies, being a regular member of the Korean Society for Neurosurgery, a regular member of the Korean Brain Tumor Society, a regular member of the Korean Society for Neuro-Oncology, a regular member of the Korean society of stereotactic and functional neurosurgery, and a regular member of the Korean Society of Endoscopic Neurosurgery. Hanyang Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-10 04

[Special][Photo News] The Seoul Campus Autumn Festival 'Rachios: Infinity' Booths

The Hanyang University Seoul Campus' autumn festival 'Rachios: Infinity' was held for three days, from September 25th to the 27th. The Seoul Campus was full of a variety of attractions and booths. The autumn festival, like its name meaning 'infinity,' provided infinite delight to students. The cameras took photos of students having happy times and making good memories together. ▲ Several booths at the 'Attraction Zone' in front of Hanmadang ▲ Students are making HYU acronym bracelets at the 'D.I.Y. bracelet' booth. ▲ Students are having fun riding a pirate ship and enjoying the theme park at 'Attraction Zone.' ▲ A student is having fun at the 'My Own Forky' booth in the 'ChangeMaker Zone' in front of the New Adminstration Building. ▲ A student is sitting idly on an air bed at the 'Dream Zone' in front of HIT. ▲ Students are taking photos at the photo zone of 'Dream Zone.' ▲ Students with rented costumes are posing at the HIT photo zone. Hanyang Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-10 01

[Media Briefing][University News Network] 'The 2019 Outstanding Hanyang Engineers Award

On September 2nd, the University News Network wrote about the '2019 Outstanding Hanyang Engineers Award,' which was held on August 29th. 'The Outstanding Hanyang Engineers Award' is awarded to Department of Engineering alumni who have contributed to national industry development and who have also practiced the university's philosophy of 'love in deed and truth.' For this year's award, Lee Jung-a of Daedong Systems and Han Sang-jun of Gumsung Electric & Controls were recipients of the '2019 Outstanding Hanyang Engineers Award.' <Article Link> http://news.unn.net/news/articleView.html?idxno=217810

2019-09 30

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Stratification and Customization: A New Route Towards Curing Rare Intractable Diseases

A few years ago, the Ice Bucket Challenge went viral on social networking services and became a popular event all around the world. People either dumped ice water on their heads or donated 100 dollars to support funds for a rare disease called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Also referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease, ALS is a disease that causes the death of neurons which control voluntary muscles. There is still no cure on ALS, with only minor treatments being available. Here is Professor Kim Seung Hyun (College of Medicine), an individual who has devoted his medical career to finding clues to this incurable disease. Professor Kim Seung Hyun (College of Medicine) has been on the field of neuro-degenerative disorders for more than 25 years. Kim has been working in the field of ALS and other neuro-degenerative disorders since 1993. Kim focuses on the issue of medication as he proposes a new model on the drug development process. “Most clinical trials are based on a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach as they do not consider individual differences among people,” said Kim. “Even though people suffer from the same disease, they might be showing different symptoms due to genetic differences. That is why some drugs cannot be commercialized regardless of their medicinal effect on selected specimen.” Kim explained that clinical trials in ALS were headed towards 'one-size-fits-all.' (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim, who has been conducting research on the unique genetic background of Korean and Asian populations, discovered that Koreans tend to have more Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) gene mutation than people of other ethnicities. Based on these findings, Kim is now working on applying this result to the development of new pharmaceuticals. “My research aims to establish a treatment strategy with a stratified model of Lou Gehrig's Disease,” Kim said. “The next step will be the customization of treatment by prescribing and providing a remedy in accordance with one’s genetic data.” Kim said his objective is to develop a diagnosis platform by utilizing AI technology. “I am endeavoring to build a nomogram that can tell what the patient requires, and I expect the discriminants to become more precise as time goes on.” By citing a 2016 Go match between AlphaGo and Lee Se-dol, Kim continued on. “AlphaGo’s victory attributes to effective processing of data accumulation. AI will lead to an innovative success on providing cures for rare intractable diseases just as AlphaGo read Lee Se-dol’s move and made an irresistible attack.” Kim advised students to be more versatile and challenging. As a renowned medical researcher and top-tier specialist, Kim highlighted the importance of being versatile. “You only deal with the basics at school,” said Kim. “Things have changed and will change even faster. You need to be prepared for globalization and technological advances.” In addition, Kim encouraged students to challenge more. “When I first started as an ALS specialist at Hanyang, I had only one patient for me to work with. However, 25 years of endless effort is what made Hanyang a world-class institution in the field of neurological disorders.” Oh Kyu-jin alex684@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Ju-eun

2019-09 26

[Special][Photo News] Everyone's Picnic with 'SIRIUS,' The ERICA Campus Fall Festival

'SIRIUS,' an autumn festival on the ERICA Campus, was held from September 17th to the 19th. The campus shined brightly during the festival like the brightest star in the sky, Sirius. A grass field behind the ERICA Academic Information Center & Library became 'Lunar Park,' according to the concept of comparing the vast and grandiose universe to campus. From the small lightbulbs, the standing in line, to the effused lights and romance of Lunar Park, HY cameras were there to capture the action. ▲ Hanyangians are enjoying a picnic at 'Lunar Park,' set behind the ERICA Academic Information Center & Library. ▲ 'How old are you?' Citizens are walking with their pets. ▲ 'Have a bite, son.' A father is sharing a slice of pizza with his son. ▲ A girl is taking a photo of her mother at Lunar Park's 'Photo Zone.' ▲ Hanyangians and animals are communicating with each other. ▲ A Hanyangian is smiling at a wandering child. ▲ The moon rose after the sunset. A family is looking at the moon.

2019-09 23

[Academics][Excellent R&D] A Step Toward Coexistence of Cultural Properties

Did you know that there is a national treasure near Hanyang University? Salgoji Bridge, the longest bridge during the Joseon Dynasty period, was excavated by Professor Ahn Shin-won (Department of Cultural Anthropology), the current head of the ERICA Institute of Cultural Properties and the chief of the Hanyang University Museum. He is now leading the Ganghwa-gun designated cultural heritage comprehensive maintenance plan, which aims to recognize and analyze the present conditions of 60 city-designated cultural assets and plans to preserve, restore, and utilize them. Professor Ahn Shin-won (Department of Cultural Anthropology) is leading the Ganghwa-gun designated cultural heritage comprehensive maintenance plan to analyze and restore the heritages. The purpose of this project is to establish a comprehensive maintenance and restoration plan of Ganghwa-gun's city-designated cultural properties, to utilize them as baseline data for preservation management and application. This is a 10 month-long project which began in July of this year and is expected to finish in May of next year. The restoration project covers 60 cultural properties, including 17 tangible cultural assets, 34 monuments, and 9 cultural heritage materials. Although it is important that our cultural heritage is preserved and maintained, making use of them is an even more important project. The comprehensive maintenance plan is a scheme to preserve cultural heritage even more efficiently. In order to carry out such a plan, there must be research done on how the present condition is. The comprehensive maintenance plan is an extended study of archeology, according to Ahn, who majored in the field. It is possible that ordinary citizens do not know the value of the excavations, which is why they must be preserved, utilized, and openly known. The city-designated cultural properties are not managed well, according to Ahn, and there are many cases where the direction boards have been mislabeled, or the roads to cultural assets are rocky and difficult to access. This is why diagnosing the current conditions of the cultural properties is important in order to take the necessary measures to better improve their state of preservation. A picture of Bunori Dondae Fort (left) and Bugilgot Dondae Fort (right) from a field study (Photo courtesy of Ahn) Executing the Ganghwa-gun designated cultural heritage comprehensive maintenance plan to preserve local cultural properties can be an exemplary case in regards to utilizing cultural assets. It can also instill the idea of protecting our cultural properties in people's minds. “We need to make sure that our children grow up in an environment where preserving our cultural heritage is not a campaign, but a basic,” said Ahn. He also emphasized the importance of preserving intangible cultural assets such as folk games, pansori (a genre of Korean musical storytelling), or religions. The ERICA Institute of Cultural Properties has long deliberated on how to improve the cultural assets alongside people in their lives and have successfully taken the lead in this sector. They are now working on how to incorporate cultural properties in stages as early as urban planning at Hanam-si. It is unprecedented in Korea that city planners and experts in cultural assets work together, according to Ahn. Cultural properties is not something grandiose. "We must think of them as our family so that we naturally protect them," said Ahn. Analysis on the present condition of the 60 cultural heritages is finished, and now, Ahn is working on the report that describes how to preserve them and how to utilize the cultural properties. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon