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2020-01 14

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Opening a New Method to Save the Environment through Discovering a Nanocatalyst

The Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering is divided into 5 different sub majors, such as Nano Technology, Bio Technology, Information Technology, and Environment & Energy Technology. Overall, it deals with discovering and creating new materials, which are related to various industries throughout the world. Professor Kim Jong-ho, researching at Hanyang University NanoChemistry Lab at ERICA Campus, has recently discovered a method of substance production and functionalization during his research. Professor Kim uncovered a new method to compose a multifunctional nanocatalyst called PdO@WO₃ and the according substance. PdO@WO₃ has never been reported in the academic world and it also serves a perfect role as both a light photocatalyst and an electrocatalyst. ▲ Professor Kim Jong-ho of the Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering of ERICA Campus has recently discovered a method of substance production and functionalization. The material that Professor Kim has discovered is formed through the direct conversion of a PdO nanocluster that has a catalyst function and an ultrathin 2D tungsten oxide (WO₃) nanosheets. This newly found nanosheet serves as a light photocatalyst that converts light energy into chemical energy, while also effectively initiating C-C coupling reactions. PdO@WO₃ can also be used as an electrocatalyst as mentioned above. It is viewed that PdO@WO₃ can be used as a new tool to reduce environmental problems. For example, many medical supplies and medicines such as anticancer drugs go through C-C coupling reactions to be produced. This chain reaction requires a light photocatalyst action of a chemical element called palladium (Pd). The action is usually initiated by mixing palladium into a solution, which makes the material almost impossible to recover after mixing. However, when using the new method created by Professor Kim, the solution becomes a heterogeneous mixture, thus allowing the recovery of the nanomaterial that still maintains the functionality as a catalyst. Palladium is one of the rare-earth materials, known for having a higher price than gold. The ability to use this material again would drop the unit price of the medical supplies and medicines greatly. Moreover, it would also help to improve our natural environment, because the mining of such materials is one of the great factors of environmental destruction. PdO@WO₃ can also be used for creating a next-generation battery to replace the existing lithium-ion battery. The lithium-ion battery has an explosion hazard and low efficiency, which is currently used the most in electronic cars. The demand for the next-generation battery, especially the ones such as the metal-air battery is increasing more than ever. The zinc-air battery that is created through the cathode electrochemical catalyst function of PdO@WO₃ has higher energy density, with no possibility of any explosion hazard. When the zinc-air battery technology becomes commercialized, developing electric cars that can replace cars with an internal combustion engine is expected to become much easier than before. ▲ a) A mimic diagram of C-C coupling reactions conducted using PdO@WO₃ as a light photocatalyst. b) The result of Oxygen Return Reaction conducted using PdO@ WO₃ as the electrocatalyst (Provided by Professor Kim Jong-ho) The discovery of Professor Kim (Thesis title: ‘Ultrathin WO3 Nanosheets Converted from Metallic WS2 Sheets by Spontaneous Formation and Deposition of PdO Nanoclusters for Visible Light-Driven C-C Coupling Reactions') was made possible through the failure of separate research. In the beginning, PdO@WO₃ was simply a byproduct of an experiment with another purpose. However, Professor Kim did not stop after faced with the failure. Instead, he thoroughly analyzed the result and continued various experiments on the newly created material. In the end, Professor Kim redefined the byproduct as a catalyst, after establishing a new method of conversion of the material. Professor Kim stated, “I discovered a new scientific knowledge from the result of an experiment that I thought of as a failure. I also want the students of Hanyang University to not be afraid of the result and to gain new knowledge within it.” The research took a total of two long years; one that ended up with the failed result of the former experiment, the other spent on analyzing and establishing PdO@WO₃. The NanoBio Chemistry Lab of Hanyang University, where Professor Kim's research was done, has continued its studies on creating eco-friendly nanocatalyst material. Professor Kim gained the original patent on the conversion method of PdO@WO₃ and published the work on a scientific journal. He is now considering the publication of how PdO@WO₃ can be applied and used for the metal-air battery. Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-01 13

[Performance]Hanyang University Designated as ‘Seoul City Campus Town’, Themed for Start-Up Campus

On December 29th, Hanyang University is newly designated as the ‘Seoul City Campus Town’ project, a start-up support facility in relation to universities. There are 17 newly designated campus towns, including 7 comprehensive types and 10 unit types, and Hanyang University belongs to the unit type university. Hanyang University was elected as it promoted the ‘HY-Seongdong Start-Up Campus’ at the exhibition held by the Seoul City Government. In this exhibition, 31 candidates applied and in-site survey, document review, and presentation followed. Hong Cheol-gi, the head of judges, said, “We considered the capability of forming start-up spaces that are specific and realizable so that they can help the start-ups immediately from 2020, detailed start-up cultivation plans to heighten the success rates and effects that can bring about including regional revitalization.” Campus town is divided into the comprehensive type and the unit type. The comprehensive type is to revitalize housing, cultural, commercial, and regional cooperation, based on the youth start-ups. The unit type is to promote youth activities based on university-specific characteristics and capacities. Previously selected comprehensive types were guaranteed 4 years and 3 years for unit types for the project duration. However, from these new projects, the project will be continued depending on the annual results of each campus town. Hanyang University is funded a maximum of 500 million won since it is selected as the unit type university. It will establish a detailed project plan from January and it will continue for a year. (Source: Yonhap News) Global News Team Translated by: Lee Seong-chae global@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-01 06

[Event][Photo] Hanyang University's Largest Scale International Winter School Opening Ceremony

Around 700 students from 23 countries participated in the Hanyang International Winter School opening ceremony, which is in its 4th year as of this year. This year’s event showed more than 5 times the growth compared to 4 years ago and the largest in scale among domestic international winter schools of foreign university students. Roughly 50 major and liberal arts courses were established at the Hanyang International Winter School. The participating students will be joining various cultural experience programs including, a winter festival, a ski camp, a Korean food cooking experience, and a viewing performance other than the classes themselves. Students who participated in the ‘2019 Hanyang International Winter School’ are taking a memorable picture together. Vice President Choi Duk-kyun is delivering the greeting to students who participated in the ‘2019 Hanyang International Winter School’ opening ceremony held in Seongdong-gu, Seoul on the 26th. The celebration performance is being held for foreign students who participated in the ‘2019 Hanyang International Winter School’ opening ceremony. The taekwondo performance for foreign students participating in the ‘2019 Hanyang International Winter School’ is taking place. Foreign students at the ‘2019 Hanyang International Winter School’ opening ceremony are watching the celebratory performances. Students who participated in the ‘2019 Hanyang International Winter School’ are taking a memorable picture together. Global News Team Translation by: Kim Hyun-soo global@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-01 06

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] When Exception Becomes a New Finding

The Human Genome Project (HGP) was an international, collaborative research program that clinched complete mapping and understanding of human genes. HGP offered clues to the resolution of diseases through genetic modifications. The base editors – which inserts, deletes, modifies, and replaces targeted DNA in a genome with engineered nucleases – are technological embodiments that integrate follow-up studies from HGP. Professor Bae Sangsu (Department of Chemistry), who has pointed out unreported issues in Adenine base editors, shared his insights with us. Professor Bae Sangsu (Department of Chemistry) published his new findings of Adenine base editors in Nature Biotechnology. Base editing technology has undergone technological innovations in the last decade. The CRISPR gene editing is the third-generation base editor following zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) gene editing and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) gene editing. The method allows the cell’s genome to be cut at the desired location by using a simplified version of the bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 antiviral defense system. The CRISPR gene editing was selected as the 2015 Breakthrough of the Year by Science. The base editing systems are now more influenced by nucleic acid sequences. A nucleic acid sequence is a succession of base-pairs signified by a series of Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, and Thymine, which determines the biological characteristics of a living organism. Cytosine base editors (CBEs) and adenine base editors (ABEs) are the two major base editors that efficiently enable base substitutions. Recently, some researchers have reported their observations of unexpected ABE-induced cytosine conversions in mouse embryos. These conversions were thought to be exceptional cases. However, Bae’s research team found out that ABEs convert cytosine to guanine or thymine in a narrow editing window and a confined TC*N sequence context. These figures present cytosine editing by ABEs. (Photo courtesy of Bae) “What we found is that cytosine conversion in ABE is a systematic consequence in a certain situation,” said Bae. “Our findings are like bugs in smartphone applications.” This research has proven that the ABE cytosine deamination activity is relatively minor compared to the canonical ABE adenine deamination activity, but is an independent one. “It is clear that CRISPR-based base editing technologies have advanced the genome-editing field,” said Bae. The professor is looking forward to making a better tool by overcoming these unexpected results. His research team is working to develop ABE which does not convert Cytosine as an improvement study. At the same time, Bae is also involved in developing a more efficient CBE through his findings. Bae is trying to carry on his research into the advancement of both ABE and CBE base editors. Some say that even a minor error may turn out to be the one thing necessary to a worthwhile achievement. Bae’s effort to systemize exceptions are set to support the quality of human life by enhancement in base editing technology. Oh Kyu-jin alex684@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Ju-eun

2019-12 30

[Event]Hanyang Global Lions 4th Completion Ceremony

On the 13th, the completion ceremony of the fourth 'Hanyang Global Lions,' a student organization that plans and holds various events for domestic and international students of Hanyang University, took place at the president's office. The ceremony was conducted with activity reports by Kim Hae-in, the fourth chairperson, and a congratulatory speech and certificate by president Kim Woo-seung. The number of students who completed the course is seven. Global News Team Translation by: Lee Seong-chae global@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-12 30

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Using Drones to Understand and Find a Solution to Fine Dust

Public awareness regarding fine dust has increased rapidly in the past decade. Weather forecasts now include daily particulate matter (PM) pollution numbers, with PM 10 meaning fine dust particles less than 10 micrometers (0.001 millimeters) in diameter. Ultrafine dust particles are dust particles smaller than 2.5 micrometers. Masks have become a necessity, and a vast number of air filtration products are topping sales. The Korean government is not standing idle as to fighting this phenomenon. A recent Seoul city government policy targeting old diesel cars for their high emission levels has banned them from entering the area within Seoul’s four main gates. However, the government also funds several research projects in order to find a solution. Professor Ahn Kang-ho (Department of Mechanical Engineering, ERICA Campus) has been part of such a project that uses drones to monitor fine dust fluctuations and understand what causes them. Professor Ahn Kang-ho (Department of Mechanical Engineering, ERICA Campus) has been developing methods of monitoring fine dust for over five years. Fine dust is created either from the top down (matter broken into pieces until they become fine dust such as yellow dust from the Gobi Desert) or the bottom up (molecules become fine dust through chemical reactions caused by high temperatures or pressures such as factories, vehicles, or ships). Ahn said that fine dust is particularly harmful as tests have shown that it is extremely difficult for the human body to filter them, which stays within the lungs and accumulates. Although people associate fine dust with factories or sandstorms, it is actually created by everyday actions like cooking meat using a frypan or smoking cigarettes. “Recently, people have been interested in fine dust, but actually, this phenomenon goes as far back as the Silla Dynasty (B.C. 57-935) in Gyeongju,” said Ahn. “There was a law that prohibited cooking rice with other materials other than charcoal.” Ahn added that some countries, especially England, learned about the dangers of this miniscule dust the hard way. Known as the Great Smog of London of 1952, the disaster killed around 12,000 people, including people suspected of having died in the following months as a result of the event. Several smog appearances in Los Angeles of the United States have also highlighted the dangers of unregulated vehicle pollution since the 1940s. Pictured is the fine dust monitoring device that Ahn created. The device is able to analyze over ten elements including time, location, wind speed, humidity, gas, and carbon particles. (Photo courtesy of Ahn) Measuring fine dust is tricky as the machines used to analyze dust particles are usually as big as cabinets and cost over 10 million won. Sampling fine dust and going back to the lab was also a big obstacle to offering real-time measurements of fine dust that was usually monitored all day. Ahn built his own machine, creating a fine dust measuring device that records elements such as time, location, wind speed, humidity, gas, and carbon particles. Ahn successfully made this comprehensive measuring device lighter, which can be fitted into a drone or backpack. Spain’s Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIC) invited Ahn to demonstrate an earlier fine dust monitoring method using balloons in both 2014 and 2016. Ahn also works with institutions in China and Mongolia. Pictured (Left) is an earlier fine dust monitoring method using air balloons deployed in Spain in 2014, and pictured (right) is a propellarized drone flying in Mongolia to test the machine in low temperatures. (Photo courtesy of Ahn) Ahn's specialized method targeting harbors flies drones to monitor ship exhaust. The experiment was conducted in Busan in 2017. (Photo courtesy of Ahn) Mobility is key to Ahn’s three dimensional fine dust measuring method. Drones carrying the device are launched into the sky surrounding a target area and slowly ascend and descend, revealing the relation between altitude, sun position, temperature and wind direction. With this method, Ahn has offered the government several fine dust monitoring methods using drones for industrial areas, roads, harbors and farms. Ahn offered the government a comprehensive report, suggesting that it monitors these areas with differing methods, including fine dust size differences between roads, creating a map that points out exhaust creating factories and the secondary changes that the fine dust particles go through, following ship routes in harbors, and mapping out farming routes and ammonia distribution. “Managing fine dust from the source is the cheapest way to solving this problem,” said Ahn. As there are no efficient methods to eliminating fine dust, Ahn said that the best way is to prevent them from being created in the first place. Fine dust will only get worse, unless governments, industries, and the public change their everyday habits that feed this poisonous cloud. Jung Myung-suk kenj3636@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-12 23

[Event]'Heartwarming' Briquette Delivery Volunteering Holds Its 7th Volunteering Service

Hanyang Harmony, an alumni volunteering corps, hosted a briquette delivering service for local residents with the Seongsu General Social Welfare Center on December 14th. A lot of Hanyangians, including faculty, alumni, and students gathered together despite the cold weather for the volunteering activity which was the seventh service ever held. Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-12 16

[Event][Photo] Hanyang Alumni Professors Prepared Dinner for 400 ERICA Campus Students

The professors of Hanyang alumni prepared dinner for students. This event under the name, "Sharing a Warm Dinner to Beloved Students" was held at 5 p.m. on November 11th at the Student Cafeteria of ERICA Campus. The late-night event provided 400 meals to the students and a special treat through prize picking. The event was also held at the Seoul Campus at the same time. Global News Team Translation by: Lee Seong-chae global@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-12 11

[Performance]Hanyang University Professors Sun Yang-kook and Kim Gi-hyun Selected as the 2019 World’s Top 1% Researchers

6,216 of the world’s 1% researchers with the largest number of paper citation counts of 2019 were announced. Among them, 45 Koreans were selected, including Hanyang professor Sun Yang-kook(Department of Energy Engineering) and Kim Gi-hyun (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.) On November 20th, Clarivate Analytics, a global academic information company, announced a total of 6,216 researchers (including the selection of duplicates in more than two categories) from 60 countries in 21 categories in the world through its report "Highly Cited Research (HCR).” The announcement has been ongoing for six years now. Americans accounted for the largest portion of the total 6,216 chosen, with 2,737 researcher(44%). There are 203 researchers from Harvard and 103 from Stanford. China followed with accounting for 636 researchers, which is a rise of 32 percent from 482 last year. South Korea had the 19th largest number with 45 researchers. This figure is a decrease of 13 researchers from 58 researchers of last year. 9 researchers were affiliated to Seoul National University which had the largest number in the country. The actual number of Korean researchers were 39 after excluding foreign professors and researchers who were double-selected two or more times. Of the two professors at Hanyang University, professor Sun Yang-kook is included in the material science field, while professor Kim Gi-hyun is included in the environmental and ecological field. Professor Sun Yang-kook already had his name on the list for 4 years since 2016, and professor Kim Gi-hyun newly registered his name on the list. A total of 12 professors were named for the first time this year among the 45 Koreans announced. ▲ Hanyang University Department of Energy Engineering professor Sun Yang-kook Professor Sun Yang-kook has been studying lithium-ion batteries for more than 20 years, which are used as energy storage for portable electronic devices and electric vehicles. Professor Sun's main research area is lithium-ion battery anode material, and professor Sun emphasizes that through his anode material research, he can develop economical and large-capacity batteries and ultimately speed up commercialization of electric vehicles by reducing production costs of electric vehicles. One of the most representative research findings by Professor Sun is the ‘concentration gradient’ anode material, which varies the concentration of the constituent material according to its location in one anode particle. In other words, the material has a higher content of nickel expressing high energy density in the center of a particle, and it is a material that increases stability as it becomes more into the surface as content of manganese becomes higher. This unique design has created a safe, long-lasting battery with large capacity. After developing 'core-shell' type concentration gradient anode material for the first time in 2005, it has developed 4G concentration gradient anode material through 10 years of research and succeeded in commercializing it by applying the material to Kia Motors' Niro EV, which was released in 2018. Professor Sun's constant research on battery anode materials was linked to 599 SCI-level papers and 456 domestic and foreign patents as of 1919. It was selected as the ‘17 Scientists Close to the Nobel Prize’ by the Korea Research Foundation in 2019 and was also selected as a stone academy member of the Electrochemical Society. ▲ Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering professor Kim Gi-hyun is receiving the certificate at the 2019 HCR Awards hosted on December 3rd. Professor Kim Gi-hyun has developed new materials related to improving the environmental analysis system that controls and manages VOCs (Volatile Air Pollutants) and odors. Benzene and formaldehyde are types of VOCs that are class one carcinogens produced in real life from driving, smoking, and cooking. Most of the current air cleaning technology is specialized in dust removal, which has limitations in detecting and removing such carcinogens. Professor Kim developed a metal organic framework (MOF), which combines metal with carbon organic matter, and succeeded in adsorption and removal of such harmful substances. It also proposed a new air quality diagnostic method that analyzes 22 types of odorous substances designated by the Ministry of Environment at the same time by developing a heat desorption-based pretreatment technology that effectively concentrates harmful substances and other samples. Professor Kim was also selected as the ‘national great scholar’ for his contribution to deploy a system analysis of harmful heavy metals in the atmosphere. His analysis system is widely used not only in research labs but also in industrial sites as it can be used in many areas such as bird flu syndrome, harmful substances from electronic cigarettes, and automobile odor diagnosis. Meanwhile, the methodology used by Clarivate Analytics (YSE:CCC; CCC.WS / the former Thomson Reuters Intellectual Property Science Division) to select influential HCR researchers is based on the analysis carried out by the Web of Science Group's Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) data experts and metrology experts. ISI is a university established within the Web of Science Group to win the reputation of Eugene Garfield, the founder of the prestigious research journal SCI, and has worked closely with universities, businesses and public institutions around the world every year announcing HCRs and Nobel Prize-winning forecasting programs. Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-12 11

[Academics]Kim Chul-geun, professor of Life Science, discovers new anticancer drugs

▲ Professor Kim Chul-geun Kim Cheol-geun, a professor of Life Science at Hanyang University, recently developed a new approach to discover binding drugs in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Region (IDPR), according to Hanyang University on November 27. It can be used to develop new anticancer drugs that can suppress cancer metastasis. This research has a significant impact in curing cancer since cancer patients have a high mortality rate from metastatic cancer than primary cancer. The nonstructural regions of a protein function in vivo through interactions with other proteins. Particularly, since cancer cells have many proteins with the non-structural region, it has been a focal point as a drug target when developing new drugs. However, since the nonstructural protein region does not have a standardized three-dimensional structure, it has been difficult to apply the structural-based drug discovery method1). Professor Kim's team successfully discovered the new drug by focusing on the 'Disorder to Order Transition' (DOT)2)’ property of the nonstructural protein region and established a computer simulation platform that predicts and analyzes the cancer metastasis protein MBD2. Kim's findings have significant implications for the development of new drugs that target transcription factors and epigenetics that are involved in gene expression control. It also makes sense for the first time to demonstrate and demonstrate that MBD2-mediated chromatin remodeling complexes may be useful target systems in the development of cancer metastasis inhibitors. Professor Kim said, "The substances discovered in this research do not show side effects on normal cells, so they are expected to be applicable to clinical trials as cancer metastasis control agents. He also added, "If so, it could be used for research on the development of various diseases besides cancer.” The research was supported by the National Research Foundation's support for mid-sized researchers and the Ministry of Science and ICT's Bio and Medical Technology Development Project. It was published in Science Advances, a sister magazine of Science on November 20. This research has done by co-first authors, Dr. Kim Min-young, Life Science professor at Hanyang University (current postdoctoral researcher, University of Florida, USA) and Dr. Na In-seong, a professor at University of South Florida (current postdoctoral researcher, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA). Also, professor Won Hyeong-sik (Biomedical Science and Engineering, Konkuk University) and professor Vladimir Ubersky (University of South Florida) participated as corresponding authors. 1) a technology to reasonably design binding drug based on the standardized structure of the target protein 2) It might have a standardized structure when combined with other proteins Global News Team Translated by Hyejeong Park global@hanyang.ac.kr