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2020-06 11

[Performance]Hanyang University Rises 4 Places to Rank 146th in 2021 QS World University Rankings

The United Kingdom’s global university ranking organization Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) announced the results of the 2021 World University Rankings on June 10. Hanyang University went up 4 places to 146th and continued its upward trend for the 10th year in a row. The world rankings were topped by the MIT in the United States with Stanford University and Harvard University following behind. In Korea, the ranking order was Seoul National University (37th), KAIST (39th), Korea University (69th), POSTECH (77th), Yonsei University (85th), Suungkyunkwan University (88th), Hanyang University (146th), Kyunghee University (236th), Gist University (295th), Ewha Womans University (393rd), Chung-Ang University (456th), Dongguk University (456th), Catholic University of Korea (456th), and Sogang University (456th), and 13 out of 15 universities climbed their rank compared to previous year. ▲ QS World University Rankings Hanyang University result page (photo by official website) Hanyang University fell from 339th in 2009 to 354th in 2010 but has continued its upward trend by rising to 314th in 2011. Compared to 10 years ago (2010), the figure has risen by 200 ranks. Hanyang's ranking in Korea has been the same for 4 years at 7th place. The evaluation criteria consists of a total of six indexes, and the ratio of the graduates’ reputation and student numbers were high in the 70s, but other indicators were relatively lower than the total score. See content in [[Hanyang Wiki]] hyu.wiki/QS세계대학평가 Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Park Gyeong-min

2020-06 10

[Special][Photo] Campus Mail Sends Hearts Despite COVID-19

Hanyang University Seoul Campus Post Office sends mail twice a day. Post office trucks load packages every afternoon at 1:30 and at 6 o'clock in the evening. Including both registered post and general post, around 200 packages are delivered with each shipment. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, Hanyangian's hearts were delivered on June 4th. ▲ A post office truck is parked in front of Hanyang University Seoul Campus Post Office to load packages on June 4th. ▲ The post office truck driver is loading packages onto the truck. The clock tower reads 1:30 PM (Doesn't it read 1:40?). ▲ The post office employee is moving packages from the post office to the truck. ▲ The post office employee is heading back to the office after sending out the mail. ▲ Post office truck is leaving to deliver packages from Hanyang University Seoul Campus Post Office.

2020-06 09

[Policy]“Dormitories Open for Students Taking Offline Exams” … Student Residence Halls Open Temporary Accommodations During Final Exam Period

Hanyang University’s Student Residence Halls have opened up temporary accommodation services for students who are not currently residing in the residence halls. This is a measure to support students who have to live close to school for a certain period of time due to offline exams and is expected to be a cheap alternative that will be used by students who live far from campus. The students who live in a residence hall and students who live in the Seoul area are not eligible, and only students who are taking offline exams can apply. Also, students who gave up their assigned rooms after April 2nd or those who left their rooms after being assigned to one will be recruited again separately from May 29th to June 11th, so one should look carefully at the selection list and apply. The student residence hall will accept 75 male and female students in total. Student Residence Hall II, Hanyang Techno Residence Hall, and Student Residence Hall III, which will house male students, will pick 4, 2, and 12 students respectively. For Student Residence Hall V, which will accept 2 students, only those in the Class of '20 can apply. Students can choose to stay in the dormitories either from June 14th to June 20th or from June 14th to June 23rd, and the price that the students have to pay differs according to the time period in which they wish to stay in the dormitories and the type of dormitory they choose. The dormitories that female students can apply to stay in (Gaenari Residence Hall, Hannuri Residence Hall, and Student Residence Hall I) will accept 4, 4, and 45 students respectively. Just like the male students, Student Residence Hall V will only accept 2 students that are in the Class of '20. Unlike Gaenari Residence Hall, Hannuri Residence Hall, and Student Residence Hall V which are 2-person rooms, Student Residence Hall I is a 3-person room and is therefore comparatively cheaper than the others. The students who wish to stay at the residence halls temporarily can register through the residence halls' website from June 8th at 10 AM until June 9th at 3 PM. As the rooms will be assigned on a first-come, first-served basis, students must register as quickly as possible. Students who have been assigned a room will be informed separately at 3 PM on June 10th. It is important to note that there will be no refunds after the living expenses have been paid, even if the student leaves in the middle of their stay. Students are also not allowed to lengthen or alter their period of stay after the living expenses have been paid. Also, the dormitories do not provide any bedding, so the students must bring their own. Detailed information can be found on the student residence halls' website. Male/Female Students Name of Residence Hall Number of Selected Students Living Expenses Note 2020.06.14 (Sun) ~2020.06.20 (Sat) 2020.06.14 (Sun) ~2020.06.23 (Tues) Male Students Student Residence Hall II 4 46,000 66,000 -Student Residence Hall V is only available for students in the Class of '20 - After the living expenses have been paid, students cannot lengthen or change their period of stay - No refunds are given for students who leave the dorms in the middle of their stay Hanyang Techno Residence Hall 2 64,000 92,000 Student Residence Hall V 2 61,000 87,000 Student Residence Hall III 12 45,000 65,000 Female Students Gaenari Residence Hall 4 64,000 92,000 Hannuri Residence Hall 4 64,000 92,000 Student Residence Hall V 2 61,000 87,000 Student Residence Hall I 45 38,000 54,000 Total 75 students ▲ The Number of Students and Costs per Residence Hall (Source: Student Residence Hall) Notice from the Hanyang University Student Residence Hall Link to register for temporary accommodation Link to register for temporary accommodation (For those who left the dorms after April 2nd) Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Lee Jung-joo

2020-06 09

[Faculty]Professor Yeh Sang-wook, Awarded for Climate Change Research

Professor Yeh Sang-wook, from the Department of Marine Sciences and Convergent Technology at the ERICA campus, awarded for 'Researcher of the Month' by Ministry of Science and ICT. The Ministry of Science and ICT and its Research Foundation stated that Professor Yeh received this award for identifying the cause behind the increase in tropical precipitation in the Pacific region due to the increase in carbon dioxide, and for providing the basis for the increase in meteorological and climate change. ▲ Professor Yeh Sang-wook (Source: Ministry of Science and ICT) Professor Yeh is a natural scientist who has been suggesting ways to solve future problems in regards to the climate by finding out the cause behind climate change and extensively studying meteorological changes, climate change, and how fine dust can affect the climate. He said that as the increase in carbon dioxide has had a great impact on global climate change, many researchers have been trying to figure out the impact of human activity on the global climate. Tropical precipitation is one of the topics that has long been studied in the field of earth science because it acts as an energy source for global air circulation. Professor Yeh suggested a new approach to the precipitation structure in tropical regions by predicting future climates in an atmosphere where the concentration of carbon dioxide has more than doubled since the period before the Industrial Revolution, through climate model experiments. The analysis showed that the precipitation levels in the western Pacific region had increased in all experiments with increased carbon dioxide concentration levels. Additionally, it has been identified that the Walker Circulation and the Hadley Circulation, which are the region’s major atmospheric circulations, are regulators that determine precipitation increase. He also presented to the climatological community that structural differences in atmospheric circulation must be considered to grasp the detailed changes of tropical climates during global warming, and published related findings from his research in the March 2019 issue of Nature Communications. Professor Yeh said, “This study is meaningful because it suggests that the Walker Circulation and the Hadley Circulation in the tropical region play the role of regulators in determining the detailed changes in the precipitation structure of the region due to the increase in regional carbon dioxide levels. We hope that this study will help us predict future changes in water circulation and abnormal meteorological/climate changes around the world.” Meanwhile, the Science and Technology Personnel of the Month Award was established to discover and reward those who have contributed to the development of science and technology in the way of excellent research findings, to boost scientists’ morale and to spread the scientific and technological mindset to the general public. The recipients of the award receive the Minister Award from the Ministry of Science and ICT and 10 million won in prize money. Visit [Hanyang Wiki] for more information: hyu.wiki/이달의_과학기술인상 , hyu.wiki/예상욱 ** The following is the full interview released by the Ministry of Science and ICT in a press release. Released in 2006, the documentary The Inconvenient Truth was enough to raise mankind’s awareness of global warming. Fourteen years after 2006, in the year 2020, the industries of the future promise a richer future for mankind with the Fourth Industrial Revolution, but the uncomfortable truth facing the global environment has not yet been resolved. Professor Yeh Sang-wook from Hanyang University stresses that “having an interest in environmental changes is the most important thing that one can and should do." He is a natural scientist who observes the earth’s mysterious natural environments and explores the characteristics of various meteorological/climate variabilities and the causes behind such phenomena. His research, which started with an investigation into the El Niño effect, has expanded to establish the correlation between the heatwave, which is South Korea’s unusual weather condition during the summer, oceanic variabilities which occur every 10 years or more, and also the correlation between fine dust and atmospheric circulation. Climate change is a global phenomenon and the most international field of research because it requires a comprehensive understanding of the global environmental system in which the oceans and the atmosphere interact and have an influence on each other. We met Professor Yeh Sang-wook, who works under the motto, “The most effective prescription begins with a definite diagnosis” by putting out his best effort to try to predict the global environment and climate’s future and to read changes to the global climate that may occur based on his climate model that helps him make assumptions under various scenarios. Congratulations on receiving the Science and Technology Personnel of the Month Award. - I feel like I am undeserving of this award. First of all, I would like to thank my fellow senior and junior researchers for giving me this opportunity to conduct good research together. I was able to get a lot of help and ideas by constantly interacting with my fellow researchers. Because of this, I was able to produce good results. I would also like to express my gratitude to the Korean Meteorological Society for recommending me to become the recipient of this month’s Science and Technology Personnel Award. The concentration levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere are increasing, which also has a significant impact on the El Niño effect and climate change. What made you interested in researching the El Niño effect and climate change? - The El Niño effect was the topic for my doctoral thesis and is still what I mainly focus on as my central research theme. During my Ph.D. program, I started to extensively research the El Niño effect as I conducted a climate prediction model study with an El Niño simulation. The El Niño is confined to the tropical central and eastern Pacific region, but its impact has reached a global scale. Therefore, it is essential to understand the El Niño effect to understand the various meteorological/climate variabilities around the world. Please introduce your major research on meteorological/climate changes. - To make it simple, my research is focused on understanding the characteristics of various meteorological/climate variabilities observed on Earth today and the causes behind such phenomena. The phenomena that I am interested in vary from the extreme summer weather observed in our country, the heatwave, to ocean variabilities that have been occurring for more than a decade. And I want to analyze and understand how these conditions will alter the future of climate change. Recently, you have identified the atmospheric circulation characteristics which regulate the tropical precipitation changes in the Pacific region due to the increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration levels, in other words, the regional changes in the two atmospheric circulation levels in the tropics are modulators that affect tropical precipitation. Please introduce the major parts of your research. - Tropical precipitation is an energy source that causes global meteorological/climate variability. So, understanding the changes in precipitation levels in the tropics, especially in the Pacific region, is the basis for understanding the global water circulation and various atmospheric-ocean systems. Through this study, we were able to find that with the increase in carbon dioxide concentrations, precipitation levels increase in the western Pacific region. Whether the carbon dioxide levels were doubled, tripled, or quadrupled, the precipitation levels in the Western Pacific region still increased. Additionally, the tropical region’s major atmospheric circulations, the Walker Circulation, and the Hadley Circulation were found to be the regulators that were responsible for determining the increase in precipitation levels. It is very important to understand future changes in precipitation levels in this region because precipitation in the Western Pacific Region of the tropics is a place that directly or indirectly affects water circulation or abnormal weather/climate in East Asia, including South Korea. You have analyzed and predicted changes in the atmosphere using various climate models. Please explain to us how one can study the changes in the atmospheric and marine environments, which are nature’s greatest phenomena. - The most essential tools for studying the changes in the atmospheric and marine environments are climate models. This is because we are unable to do any direct experiments on the atmosphere or the ocean that we encounter every day. Computer programs that reflect complex physical equations behind what governs such natural phenomena can help us predict atmospheric and oceanic motions. This computer program is a climate model. Through climate models, one can understand how the atmospheric and marine environments change by assuming various scenarios that may occur on Earth in the future. June 5th is World Environment Day. The importance of the oceans and the atmospheric environment is being emphasized worldwide. What do climate change researchers predict the future of Earth's climate will be like? Do you have anything that you want to suggest to the people of South Korea? - I can say for sure that if there is one topic that people should be concerned about in the future, climate change is exactly that. Imagine a scenario where the economy has boomed and great scientific discoveries have been made, and therefore human life has become richer. Even in such scenarios, if climate change occurs drastically, humans will not be able to survive. It’s easy to understand here about why we should be even more concerned about climate change than any other problem. Even if I don’t talk about my research findings, it is evident that the climate of our planet is changing fast and rapidly. Above all, I think the most important thing that we can do at this time is to pay attention to the changing environment. When every citizen pays constant attention to environmental problems, I think that policy can then be enforced and therefore encourage a change in everyone’s behavior. As climate change is a global phenomenon, it seems that there is a need for us to communicate and cooperate with researchers from around the world and that we need to pay attention to several research findings so that the results of our research on climate change can be reflected in the international community and social policies. - I think the most important task that needs to be done here is to understand the various phenomena that are currently happening around us and to identify the causes behind them. When the exact causes are identified, appropriate policies can then be established. Above all, climate change is a global phenomenon, so reasearch has to be an international effort. More than in any other field of study, in ours there is a more active collaboration amongst researchers from around the world. Before being appointed as a professor at Hanyang University, you worked as a Staff Weather Officer (SWO), a post-doctoral researcher at the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmospheric Studies (COLA) in the United States, and also as a researcher at a government-funded research institute. I think that such experiences would have been the basis for what strengthened your research competitiveness. - Yes, that is correct. During my time as an SWO, I learned what the actual demands of the military were, and from this, I learned that the most important subject of a research project should be the most realistic one. Through my post-doctoral research in the United States and my experience as a researcher at a government-funded research institute, I was able to think about the importance of joint research and the kind of research that South Korea needs. Along with creative research, you have also put a lot of effort into fostering great minds. As a researcher or teacher, what is the emphasis that you put on your students or the members at your lab? - Well, I’m not so sure. What I say to my students and lab members is quite common and ordinary. I just say, “Do your best.” I emphasize that they should always choose to give their best efforts, and not to become the best. Of course, it’s good to be the best, but not everyone can be the best. But everyone can try their best. When one makes their best efforts, they can be the best, and even if they don't become the best, they will still be able to live a life without any regrets. What is your usual attitude towards life as a researcher (your basic philosophy of life)? - The most important attitude that a researcher should have over everything else is to never lose interest. In particular, natural scientists who study the nature of the Earth should feel: ‘How mysterious and strange natural phenomena are!', and I think that having this kind of view and perspective towards any research would make it interesting to study any other subject. What is a challenge that you ultimately want to overcome in your research field? - My ultimate challenge seems to be to accurately predict the future. If we can predict the future changes in weather and climate conditions that we experience every day with some accuracy, we can then share such benefits globally. Please leave a word of advice to students who dream of becoming scientists in the future. - Science bears many interesting and mysterious fruits. Also, such fruits can give many people great benefits. If you’re dreaming of becoming a scientist, you first need to train yourself to be observant of those around you. Scientists must also have the eye to see the other side of phenomena. You can’t have such an eye automatically. You need to have a habit of constantly observing and looking at the phenomena that occur around you, especially those that occur in nature. This habit will help you grow into becoming a great scientist. Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Lee Jung-joo

2020-06 09

[General][On-the-spot] “Where Did All the Cars Go?” After the Opening of the Parking Gate

From the operation of the "Industrial Center Parking Gate" from June 1, there has been a noticeable drop in the numbers of vehicles on campus. Parked cars disappeared due to ordinary vehicles being virtually restricted from entering designated areas. Most of the parking has been relocated to parking lots built below the Track and Field, with signs set up at the existing parking areas that green areas or rest areas are to be created. In line with the launch of the underground parking lot at the Track and Field, the Property Management Team plans to strengthen ground-level parking management and create a pedestrian-centered, pleasant, and safe campus. ▲ Only authorized vehicles can enter the parking gate installed under the passageways between the Industrial Center and the Engineering Building 2. ▲ A vehicle is entering the parking lot installed underground beneath the Track and Field. The number of available parking spaces can be checked at the entrance. ▲ The view of the parking lot in front of the Industrial Center (Advanced Materials & Chemical Engineering Building) from the Amphitheater. ▲ The view of the parking lot in front of the Industrial Center from the Hanyang University Museum. No vehicles are parked. ▲ A green space construction notice is installed at the parking space in front of the Advanced Materials & Chemical Engineering Building. ▲ Flower pots are located instead of vehicles at the parking lot in front of the Information Technology / Bio Technology building. ▲ A green space construction notice is installed at the parking space in front of the Information Technology / Bio Technology. ▲ General vehicles cannot be seen even in the Graduate School parking lot. ▲ Vehicles usually parked along the back road of the Paiknam Academic Information Center & Library cannot be seen, and instead flower pots are placed. ▲ Parked vehicles cannot be seen in front of the College of Education either. Parking is not possible due to the placement of flower pots. Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Park Gyeong-min

2020-06 09

[Performance]Hanyang University Ranks 38th in the 2020 THE Asia University Evaluation and 2nd in Korea in International Reputation

On June 3, the results of the Asian University Assessment, organized by Times Higher Education (THE), were released. Hanyang University moved down five steps to 38th. With Tsinghua University of China ranked 1st in the overall Asian rankings, Seoul National University ranked the highest among Korean universities at 9th. Hanyang University had shown a gradual increase annually from 74th place in 2013 to 33rd place in 2019, but unfortunately it dropped five levels down to 38th in the 2020 evaluation. The total score was down 0.2 points compared to last year. However, among the five evaluation indexes, the industry-academic cooperation income and international reputation index rose 6.2 points and 2.5 points respectively, while the international reputation ranked 2nd among domestic universities. The paper citation counts were reduced by four points, bringing disappointing results. Meanwhile, 489 universities from 30 Asian countries participated in the 2020 THE Asia University Assessment, and 5 categories and 13 detailed indicators were used, including 30 percent for the paper citation counts, 30 percent for research, 25 percent for education conditions, 7.5 percent for internationalization, and 7.5 percent for profits from industry-academic cooperation. View at [Hanyang Wiki] https://hyu.wiki/THE아시아대학평가 Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Park Gyeong-min

2020-06 08 Important News

[Special]Hanyangians with Unique Part-Time Jobs

College life can be very expensive. With books, food, and occasional gatherings to pay for, students are often left with empty wallets. So, many seek part-time jobs. The usual options are working at a coffee shop or a convenience store. However, some students have gone through unique part-timer experiences that are worth sharing. Communicating in three languages at a duty-free shop Park Jung-moon (Department of Electronic Engineering, 3rd year) shared his experience of working as an interpreter at a duty-free shop. Park worked from June to December in 2018. “I spent the first three months translating and giving directions. Then I started greeting guests from the membership desk for the next three,” said Park. Park Jung-moon (Department of Electronic Engineering, 3rd year) shared his experience of working as an interpreter at a duty-free shop selling tax-free luxury goods. (Photo courtesy of Daum News) At the start, Park did not expect his job to be unique or difficult. “I thought a duty-free shop would have a quiet and relaxed atmosphere, like a gourmet store selling luxury goods,” said Park. He soon changed his mind, realizing that “due to the majority of customers being proxy buyers, infamous for hoarding goods and reselling them through online markets, the shop was very busy and hard to organize.” When asked about the pros and cons of the job, Park replied that his Chinese and English skills were enhanced at the cost of minor physical pain. “I have had very few opportunities to meet foreigners in Korea, but as I worked at the duty-free shop, I was able to meet various types of people. On the downside, controlling the crowd and standing for a long time hurt my legs and back a bit,” said Park. Park said the part-time job offered him a chance to meet new people and changed his personality. (Photo courtesy of JoongAng Ilbo) Park also said his personality changed after the experience. “I used to be shy, but after encountering so many people during the part-time job, I became more outgoing. Also, I had no knowledge about make-up materials, but after selling cosmetics, I know a lot about them now.” Reflecting on his experience, Park recommended the job to Hanyangians who are confident in speaking other languages and not afraid of meeting new people. Memories of chicken skewers Hong Gil-dong (anonymous interviewee, College of Engineering, 3rd year) also introduced an uncommon part-time job he had during March of 2018, which was to cook chicken skewers on a food truck. “I wanted to try out something new before enlisting for the army,” said Hong. Touring around Seoul and Gyeong-gi province on a truck, he served customers chicken skewers he cooked on the spot. As a unique part-time job, Hong Gil-dong (anonymous interviewee, College of Engineering, 3rd year) cooked chicken skewers on a food truck. (Photo courtesy of Hong) The work, for him, was very easy to learn. He also liked that the shift usually ended around 4 pm, earlier than the contracted 5 pm, because they quickly sold out of chicken skewers. Yet the most joyous part of the work was “getting to have chicken skewers limitlessly.” His boss was kind and always let Hong have the spare chicken skewers. He also exchanged food with other food trucks which sold sushi, soda, and other snacks. “One drawback of the job was that there was no fixated work spot for me to punch in for work,” said Hong. The chicken skewers Hong cooked. (Photo courtesy of Hong) Cooking chicken skewers was the most satisfying part-time job Hong has ever had. “The job is pretty free for the majority of the time. The shift is 7 hours but I barely worked for three.” He added –with confidence- that he learned how to cook chicken skewers better than any man on the street. “On top of that, now I know the economic workings of chicken skewers such as the initial cost and net profit inside out.” “I recommend this part-time job to all of my fellow Hanyang students,” Hong said, adding that the job was fruitful, fun and educational, especially for men who are waiting to enlist in the army and have a lot of free time on their hands. Lee Yoon-seo cipcd0909@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-06 07 Important News

[Special]Tourism After the Coronavirus Outbreak

Everything has stopped due to the coronavirus outbreak. Nations across the world have imposed travel restrictions to prevent the spread of the disease. The tourism industry has been directly affected by these procedures, recording a 98.2 percent drop of inbound travelers in April compared to previous years. However, despite the hugely negative downturn, Professor Lee Hoon (Division of Tourism), one of the leading commentariats in the field, has a rather positive outlook on tourism. The tourism industry has directly been affected by the recent coronavirus outbreak, but Professor Lee Hoon (Division of Tourism) maintains a positive outlook on K-tourism in the long run. “The tourism industry faces crises of some form every three to four years,” explained Lee. Nonetheless, the professor acknowledged the unprecedented nature of the current condition as traveling inbound and outbound were both shut down. This is expected to create a huge economic blow as the industry is in an interdependent relationship with the visitor economy. Lee estimates a 50 trillion to 70 trillion won loss in tourism revenue this year alone as long as the epidemic continues. The government has recently provided a bailout package to maintain employment and to support the industry. Seoul paid an extra 5 million won to individual tourist agencies through stimulus checks. However, Lee pointed out the absence of holistic measures as there have only been stopgaps to prevent the industry's abrupt collapse. “The government measures disregard the blind spots of tourism, most of which are freelancers and small business owners,” criticized Lee. "They need to shape a crisis management system by viewing the tourism industry as an ecosystem." Lee said there is a huge demand in the crisis management system to support the ecosystem of tourism. (Photo courtesy of Newsis) However, Lee maintains a careful optimism about the future of K-tourism. He expects that excellence in the K-quarantine will give a positive impact on the tourism industry. “The quarantine authorities of Korea have secured trust through transparent information disclosure and active treatment of international tourists,” explained the professor. Lee added that it will provide a favorable condition for visitors when tourism is resumed at full-scale. Lee predicted that once the tourism does resume, the form of travelling will change. “Travelers are expected to rely more on foreigner independent tours (FITs) than group tours,” said the professor. Also, there would be more provocative attempts in the convergence of tourism and informational technology, as well as advancements in the management of safety and hygiene. “As people are getting more sensitive about such issues, accommodation and food culture are those that are bound to undergo improvements.” Lee expects that the excellent practice of K-quarantine will contribute to the future success of K-tourism. Lee asked for a shift of ideas, encouraging the introduction of innovations in tourism. “Travel needs will not disappear as long as people live their lives,” said the professor. “The coronavirus outbreak can be a blessing in disguise from the perspective of the tourism industry, which could eventually lead to a step-up in K-tourism.” Considering the demands for overseas travel, Lee forecasted domestic travel to rapidly increase in return. The professor expected tourist attractions that provide beautiful natural scenery with fewer people will gain popularity. Lee recommended cities along Route 7 (i.e., Samcheok, Uljin, Yeongdeok, and Pohang) for this summer vacation. “Those cities offer feasible coastal drives as well as great trekking courses along the seashore,” said Lee. Oh Kyu-jin alex684@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Oh Kyu-jin

2020-06 06 Important News

[Special]The Story of a Library Keeper

While most universities stopped opening their libraries or reduced operating hours due to the coronavirus, Paiknam Academic Information Center and Library is keeping their hours the same as before. “We thought that maintaining the library as the students' studying place would be safer, rather than having them gather outside,” said Professor Han Hyun-soo (Director of Paiknam Academic Information Center and Library, Division of Business Administration). In order to maintain the opening hours, Han and other librarians are making extra efforts to prevent the virus inside the library. Professor Han Hyun-Soo (Director of Paiknam Academic Information Center and Library, Division of Business Administration) is guarding the students from the coronavirus. As COVID-19 become more serious, it is Han's daily duty to patrol the library day and night. He guides the students to keep their masks on at all times and to practice social distancing. Han has also posted announcements around the building telling students to notify him if someone is not wearing a mask or is not following social distance guidelines. Once he receives a note, he rushes to the spot – even during our interview. Han posted announcements with his phone number, which reads "If you spot a person who is not wearing a mask, please contact the number below." Han also checks students' temperatures at the entrance of the library. If their temperature exceeds the normal (36.5 degrees), students are not allowed to enter the library. Han is also in charge of checking the students' temperaturex in front of the library entrance. Patrolling the library, Han said he feels a sense of admiration, seeing how hard the students are studying, and pride as the director of the library frequented by such great students. “I hope everyone works together and overcomes this situation safely. For that, I would like to sincerely thank the library staff, who place the students’ safety as their utmost priority,” said Han. He added, “I'm also very sorry to the students that I have had to force to leave.” Han patrols the library day and night, guiding students who do not have their masks on or are not adhering to social distance guidelines. The librarian prepared some hopeful news for after the coronavirus. “With a donation from the president, we were able to afford to build a music hall and a small movie theater on the second floor, in place of where the director's room and the president's rooms are currently located.” Construction will start once the coronavirus epidemic is over. Private lockers are also being installed on the second basement floor. “There will be more places to rest and study pleasantly by the time students come back to the library. Until then, I hope they do their best to study while staying safe,” said Han. Hwang Hee-won whitewon99@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-06 01

[Performance]Hyundai Management Announces Hanyang University Ranks 4th Among Universities with the Top 100 CEOs in 2020

According to a survey taken on May 20 of 127 CEOs of the top 100 companies in sales by Hyundai Management, a management journal, the number of CEOs from Hanyang University was the fourth largest. The average age of the top 100 CEOs in Korea is 59. The average length of time a CEO serves in a company is 26.5 years, with it taking 20.7 years to become a CEO. The average year was 23 until 2018, but it decreased to 21.7 last year, and went down another year this year. The average tenure of CEOs is also in decline, with 29.8 years in 2017, 29.6 years in 2018, 27.4 years in 2019, and 26.5 years in 2020. Hanyang University ranked fourth with 6.3% of the CEOs. Seoul National University ranked highest with 26%, followed by Korea University (15.7%), and Yonsei University (14.2%). Additionally, the commercial economy sector (45.2%) and social sciences sector (6.5%) were higher than the natural sciences and engineering sector (41.1%). Last year’s ratio was also higher in the commercial economy sector than the natural sciences and engineering sector by 9.8%, thus the gap widened. This reflects a trend that businesses are focusing more on management rationalization rather than technology development. Meanwhile, according to the Economist report on May 25 of 134 CEOs of the top 100 companies, CEOs from Hanyang University were the fifth largest with eight people. Seoul National University ranked first with 21.6%, followed by Korea University (11.9%), and Yonsei University (9%). Sungkyunkwan University ranked fourth with nine people (6.7%), which was a slight increase from the Hyundai Management report (3.8%). Those in their 50s and 60s accounted for 76.3% of the total. There were 10 people over 70s, and nine people in their 30s~40s, which was smaller than the number of people in over 70s. By major, 32 people graduated from the Department of Business Administration, accounting for a quarter of the total. The total number of graduates of business-related majors such as commercial science and accounting is 37 people. Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Park Gyeong-min

2020-06 01 Important News

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Standing at the Center of Cutting-Edge Technology

Although there have been notable advances in the study of natural science, research related to high pressure has not been active in Korea due to the lack of groundwork technology. Professor Kim Jaeyong (Department of Physics) is opening up the route to high pressure research through the HYU-HPSTAR-CIS High Pressure Research Center, the hub of collaboration between the world-class institutes. Professor Kim Jaeyong (Department of Physics) is paving the way for high pressure research in Korea. The HYU-HPSTAR-CIS High Pressure Research Center was established in 2016 with support from The Ministry of Science and ICT. The research center is in a collaborative relationship with the Carnegie Institution for Science (CIS) of the United States and the Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR) of China. The three institutes are consistently sharing their research outcomes by holding joint symposiums and reinforcing researcher exchanges. Kim explained the collaboration as “a successful case of acquiring advanced technologies by bringing in world-class institutes,” referring to the research spirit of the center as “Moon Ik-jeom spirit.” Moon is a historical figure who brought cottonseed from China into Korea, allowing the country to produce and distribute cotton to citizens. Just as Moon did in the past, Kim attained three diamond anvil cells, high pressure devices that enable the compression of a small piece of material with extreme pressure, from HPSTAR in 2016. Within a short period, Kim succeeded in producing a unique version of the cell. The center’s main focus is on hydrogen energy storage. The have recently reported successful results in the reversible storage of hydrogen energy. By imposing high pressure in Ti-Zr-Ni Quasicrystals, the research team was able to keep 4.2 wt of hydrogen at room temperature. Kim hopes that the results will contribute to the commercialization of hydrogen-powered cars. Kim hopes to contribute to the commercialization of hydrogen-powered cars with his recent research. Kim has demonstrated his will to help position the HYU-HPSTAR-CIS High Pressure Research Center as the hub of high pressure research. Kim also encouraged more students to participate in the research. “Our university has sufficient human resources, research conditions, and support systems to conduct the research,” said the professor. “I hope the students can feel the sense of thrill that comes from standing at the center of cutting-edge technology.” Oh Kyu-jin alex684@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-06 01 Important News

[Special]Teaching Practicum Without Students

For students in the College of Education, the teaching internship is a mandatory requirement in order to graduate. Normally, students would visit high schools or middle schools and temporarily take on the role of teacher for a few weeks, preparing lectures and handling administrative work. However, due to the coronavirus, offline classes were stopped and teaching practicums had to change as well. Two students shared their teaching practicum experiences which were quite different from how they typically are. Handling online classes Cho Sung-hyun (Department of Education, 4th year) had his teaching practicum for two weeks at his old school, Jeonju Youngsaeng High School. Cho’s job was to analyze the textbooks and create his own lessons for the students. Since Cho could not give his lectures face to face with students, he had to record the lectures with a camera in the empty classroom. Cho edited his videos, uploaded them to Youtube, and shared the URL of his lectures through EBS Online Classes. “For my first lecture, I kept forgetting the lines and had to re-record the video multiple times - I repeated the greeting more than 10 times,” said Cho. Cho Sung-hyun (Department of Education, 4th year), during his teaching practicum at Jeonju Youngsaeng High School, had to teach his students through online Youtube videos. (Photo courtesy of Cho) “Since teachers couldn’t directly see students listening to the classes, we had to somehow make sure that students actually watched the class videos,” said Cho. He explained that they assessed the students’ learning progress through quizzes using Google form surveys. Cho also utilized Youtube to communicate with his students, holding a question and answer session through Youtube videos. “Some other teachers preferred to communicate through messages and phone calls,” said Cho. Although this year’s teaching practicum was different from the usual experience, Cho said there was a lot to gain. “It was fascinating that I could have a positive influence on a student’s life. Although my current dream is to become a producer of educational documentaries, I think I would have changed my career to teacher had I done the teaching practicum earlier.” Cho added that “My only regret is that I could not spend time with my students. I would describe my first teaching practicum as a ‘first love with regrets.’” Feeling the passion of teachers Lee Da-eun (Department of Applied Art Education, 4th year) had her teaching practicum for four weeks at her old school, Dongduk Girls’ High School. Lee also had to carry out her classes online, and she prepared art lectures for senior students, which were uploaded onto the EBS website. Lee also attended the online real-time classes of senior teachers. She was also in charge of checking attendance through simple quizzes in the morning and calling students who did not solve the quizzes. Lee Da-eun (Department of Applied Art Education, 4th year) gave online art lectures to senior students during her four-week teaching practicum. (Photo courtesy of Lee) Lee recalled that in the beginning, the teachers were very confused about how to handle the situation and that there was a limited amount of work Lee could do as a trainee. So, Lee and other trainee teachers used their spare time to practice together. They gave class demonstrations and received feedback from each other. Lee and other trainee teachers used their time wisely by giving class demonstrations and receiving feedback from each other. (Photo courtesy of Lee) Lee said the most memorable experience was when she conducted phone counseling with students who dreamt of working in the field of art. It was exciting that she was able to help them work out their problems. “It was sad that I could not experience the teaching practicum fully because of the coronavirus,” said Lee. “Nonetheless, the experience was still meaningful for I felt the passion of the teachers struggling to educate students even during this harsh time.” Hwang Hee-won whitewon99@hanyang.ac.kr