Total 1196Articles
News list
Content Forum List
2016-11 28 Important News

[Academics]Unified Model of a Minute World

Professor Cho Jun-hyeong of Department of Physics is interested in the study of low-dimension nanomaterial of one and two dimensional nanostructures formed on the surface of solid matters. Working as an editorial staff of Scientific Reports, a sister magazine of Nature, Cho is the member of the Korean Physical Society, American Physical Society, and the Korean Vaccum Society. Cho's paper, completed with a second editor, Lee Se-ho (Physics, Doctoral program), 'Dimensionality and Valency Dependent Quantum Growth of Metallic Nanostructures: A Unified Perspective', suggests a unitary, simple model that explains the preferred length and thickness of nanowires and nanofilms made by various kinds of metals, by using diameter of the nanostructure and the phenomenon called Friedel Oscillations. Cho embodies himself in the field of nanostructures. (Photo courtesy of Cho) The atoms of a solid mass are arranged in a periodical manner. However, there is a phenomenon which breaks this periodicity, called crystallographic defect. For example, if an atom is not present where it should be situated, it is called point defect. In addition, planar defect occurs when many atoms do not exist in a surface form. Nanowires that are covered in Cho’s paper have point defect from a certain place of their infinite length. On the other hand, nanofilms have planar defect from some amount of their infinite width. When defects of a solid mass occur, the electrons of solid matter and the defects interact together, forming a density wave named Friedel Oscillations. Friedel Oscillations are a similar to water waves made when a rock is thrown on the surface of a calm lake. In the study, Cho discovered that nanowires are energetically stable at the length that matches the wavelength of Friedel Oscillations. The period of Friedel Oscillations is determined by the composition and diameter of the nanostructure. Cho found that the preferred length of the nanowire and thickness of nanofilm, called magic length and magic thickness, differentiates depending on the diameter of the nanowire and its metal component. Cho found out that as the diameter of nanowire extended, the period where magic length occurs differs in length in accordance with the type of metal. The period of alkali metals and group IB metals (copper, silver, gold) increased as the diameter of nanowire elongated. In the case of transition metals and groups IIIA to VA metals, the period decreased. The structure of nanomaterials (left) and the magic length of nanowires composed of diverse metals (right). (Photo courtesy of Cho) Cho confirmed the structural stability of nanowires by changing their diameters. When the diameter of a nanowire is more than 10Å [Å: angstrom, unit of length equal to 6990100000000000000♠10−10 m], it can be called a nanoisland. If the diameter of the nanowire becomes infinitely large, it will become a nanofilm. “In this study, we found that when the diameter of the nanowire is increased, the vibration period becomes the same as that of the nanofilm, also being saturated,” Cho said. This means that when the diameter of the nanowire becomes larger, the magic length equals the magic thickness of the nanofilm. The reason for this saturation of the oscillation period is because the Friedel Oscillations are the same in the case of the above two systems. There was a need for a comprehensive theory that encompasses studies on nanowires and nanofilms that have been ensuing for the past 30 years, because there was a lack of unified understanding about different magic lengths, and the thickness of nanowires and nanofilms from diverse substances. “I believe that finding new puzzle pieces has a lot of meaning but putting those piled pieces together into a big picture is also very significant,” Cho emphasized. “This research may spur motivation for other research on new nanostructures, since it explained a preferred length and thickness in a uniform approach when low-dimensional nanostructures are formed,” he added. Currently, Cho is handling a joint study with University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) and Zhengzhou University's research teams, as well as continuing theoretical research on different nanostructures. The research plan of Cho’s laboratory is to proceed with a study which combines surface, nano, and topology fields. Not only has Cho achieved great accomplishments in the field of nanostructures, but he is concerned about his students who would lead the scientific domain in the future. “I am trying to offer students a lot of experiences, such as encouraging them to attend academic conferences. I also try to converse with them, because science can advance in that way- through involvement and communication,” he said. Cho thinks what professors, schools, and the government should aim to create suitable atmospheric and foundational provisions for science students for them to focus on their work. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-11 28

[Culture]Global Community in Itaewon, Seoul

Itaewon refers to the roughly 1.4 km-stretch from Itaewon 1-dong to Hannam 2-dong in Yongsan-gu, Seoul. When you get off at Itaewon station, line number 6, signs of stores written in English, Chinese, and Japanese will catch your eyes. Just by walking along the streets, one will soon sense the exotic atmosphere that can only be felt in Itaewon. In fact, Itaewon is one of the most outlandish places in Seoul where people of different nationalities and cultures are clustered. As a 'foreign city', Itaewon is also the place where foreign residential districts and a number of foreign embassies are gathered. In 1997, Seoul designated Itaewon as the first ‘Special Tourism District’ for both foreigners and Korean citizens. There are more than 2000 stores that include shopping centers, restaurants, recreational facilities, trade firms, hotels and tourist bureaus. Hamilton Hotel is located at the center of Itaewon. (Photo courtesy of Hamilton Hotel Seoul) Stories behind its formation While the word 'Itaewon' originated from the Joseon Dynasty when it originally referred to a residence specifically for the Japanese, the current form of this global tourism site is more relevant to Korea’s modern history. After the Korean War (1950-1953), the American military base was established in Yongsan which was later followed by more residential zones and businesses for its soldiers. Itaewon was once called as the 'Las Vegas of Seoul', the recreation center for American soldiers. Soon, the place attracted more foreigners who started to spread their own cultures in the region. Only in Itaewon Itaewon Antique Furniture Street is close to Itaewon station Exit 4. (Photo courtesy of Visit Seoul) As mentioned, there are many different stores and restaurants that fascinate tourists. While there are high-end brand stores in Itaewon, big and small indie shops in street corners contribute more to the distinctive character of Itaewon. Fashion shops specialize in imported clothes, furs, handbags, shoes and antique furnitures that are hard to find in general Korean markets. Its price range is quite extensive- from being fairly affordable to being as expensive as designer brands. Dress shops are also more easily seen in Itaewon for foreigners who are more used to partying than Koreans. For foreigners with different body shapes, bigger sizes are also well-stocked in Itaewon shops. Cuisines from 30 different countries such as Korea, the US, the UK and India are also one main reason why people visit Itaewon. The 'World Food Street' located at the back of Hamilton Hotel is currently one of the most popular places to eat as it allows people to try exotic foods that are hard to experience without going overseas. Itaewon is the only place where people can find cuisines that are hard to find in other parts of Korea. It is said that Bulgarian and Uzbekistan restaurants can only be found in Itaewon. Moreover, the fact that a lot of foreign restaurants stick to their traditional or original recipes adds to their allure. The World Food Street of Itaewon. (Photo courtesy of Visit Seoul) The first Islamic mosque in Korea Behind the Itaewon fire station, another unfamiliar sight can be spotted along with the smell of pungent spices. It is Usadan-gil, or Islamic street, which manifests the harmonious blend of Seoul’s old landscape and Islamic culture. The first Islamic mosque in Korea, the Seoul Central Mosque, is located at the center of Usadan-gil. In the country where Christian crosses are more frequently found, twin minarets that tower around the mosque is a sure unique site to check out. To visit the mosque, people must abide by the Islamic law, which forbids wearing short-sleeved tops, skirts, and pants. To take a more constructive tour inside the mosque along with a guide, it is advised to make a reservation beforehand through the Seoul Central Mosque's official homepage. With 35 thousand Korean Muslims, there are a total of apporoximately 150 thousand Muslim devotees who attend the Itaewon Muslim Mosque. (Photo courtesy of Seoul City Tour) Itaewon is a place where different people from various cultures coexist. It is an important duty for all of its members, both Koreans and foreigners, to try their best to keep peace and security within its community while fostering its uniqueness in Korea's number one tourism district. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-11 28 Important News

[Event]Hanyang Startup Open Campus

On November 23rd, Hanyang Startup Open Campus was held in the Alumni Building of Hanyang University's Seoul Campus. During this event, alumni entrepreneurs and students interested in starting their own businesses were invited. A variety of sessions were held regarding business startups. The program consisted of the following sessions: Open Class, Recruiting, Exhibition, Mentoring, and Summit. The 8th Hanyang Startup Academy (HSA) took charge of the ending ceremony along with other programs of the event. During the Open Class session, special lectures were given by the CEO of Zennycloset, an eco-friendly brand, along with the manager of Wadiz, a crowdfunding group. Through the lecture, people shared their experiences of succeeding in business. In the second session, a job recruitment fair was set up to connect students to the Hanyang Startup companies. The Exhibition session was one of the most bustling events of the whole event. Since goods and major work have been on display in the lobby, people were able to touch and experience the products created by Hanyang startup companies. One of the most popular goods was the 2016 Art & 3D Printing Design Award winners' work, which consisted of daily supplies, industrial supplies, and reusable design goods. The Exhibition session was one of the most bustling events of the whole program. As for the Mentoring session, experts with practical business skills acquired through their own hands-on experience consulted with those wishing to start a business. Some of the common issues that arise from startup businesses were dealt with. The session consisted of the following topics: business, accounting, law, patent, tax, finance, public relations, marketing, and overseas expansion. With experts participating from such diverse fields of expertise, people were satisfied with one-point lessons that answered a lot of the questions they had in mind. The main session of the day was the Summit, which included the completion ceremony of HSA, and the bestowal of the 2016 Art & 3D Printing Design Award. This year, it was the 8th completion ceremony of the HSA, where a total of 98 trainees (26 in advanced course, 72 in standard course) had applied. The ratio of enrolling bachelor students to graduates was 3:7. They were from majors as varied as to include Science and Engineering, Business, Art, Music and Physical Education. As for the Design Award, the grand prize went to Park Ju-young (Department of Chemical Engineering, 2nd year) who produced a non-electricity sound amplifying speaker. Park Ju-young won the grand prize for the 2016 Art & 3D Printing Design Award. The Hanyang Startup Open Campus was a meaningful event in that it summed up this year's excellent startup results acquired by the alumni and their subsequent companies. The program contained numerous sessions that were useful to the attendees, and would have been a great choice for budding Hanyangian entrepreneurs to have participated in it. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2016-11 28 Important News

[Alumni]Ko Kang-min, the Leader of Mabangzen

The history of theatrical plays traces back to Ancient Greece. Since then, different forms of entertainment emerged. From private films to musicals, the demand for performance arts have increased rapidly in the modern era, overpassing a number of theatrical plays. Yet, there is work to retrieve from the golden age of plays, and Ko Kang-min (Business and Administration ’01, ERICA Campus) is one individual who supports it as the CEO and producer of the theater company, Mabangzen. It is also known as a 'playfactory' where original plays are created from scratch in order to promote the theatrical plays of Korea. For Shakespeare, the world was a stage, and all the men and women were actors. For Ko, the stage is his life, bringing life to Korean theatrical plays. Ko developed the company successfully based on his experiences. Q1. Can you tell us more about Mabangzen and its origin? Ko: "Mabangzen is a company that produces and performs plays for the public. Our plays are all original plays where we develop everything, from the script to the stage setting, from the beginning to the end. The company was first established in 2005 by the play director, Ko Sung-wong. And it was named after the Korean traditional game Mabangzen, similar to Sudoku, in hopes of promoting the importance of teamwork. Like a game of Mabangzen where all the numbers added on each side must equal in sum, when all the members of the team cooperate to put together a play, the results will follow. Today, there are 46 members in the company including actors, producers, and directors." Q2. What is your role in the theater company? What do you like about your work? Ko: “Currently, I work as the CEO and producer in the company. I like to say that I am a supporter who manages the financial aspects, renting theaters, and finding sponsors, as well as practical aspects such as making the final call of which play to perform. I totally love my job here because I get to interact with the actors and the staff which reminds me of the days when I was just like them. I came to Mabangzen in 2010 after Ko Sung-wong convinced me to collaborate with him in the small theater company. It was a tough decision but when I believed that the goals we had as playwrights matched - forming a systemic method to generate quality plays - I agreed to it. I was also a big fan of Ko Sung-wong’s theatrical pieces. I think we work very well together.” Mabangzen produces original plays based on Korean culture. (Photo courtesy of Mabangzen) Q3. Can you tell us about the company’s work? Ko: “The most well-known piece of our company is called 'Hongdo', a play first introduced to the Korean public in 1936. It is a melodrama and a tragedy. The basic synopsis is about a woman, Hongdo, who is a gisaeng, or Korean geisha, who lives in a melancholic life after a heartbreaking incident with a man. This piece was very popular back in the mid-21st century; however, the writer of the play defected to North Korea which resulted in the public to shut off interest. We have performed this play since 2014 in major venues like the Seoul Arts Center and the Coex Arts Hall, as well as on the international stage in places such as the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Belarus, Turkey, and Chile.” Q4. You have also acted onstage. When did you first get involved in theater arts? Ko: “Yes. I have experience on stage as an actor as well. I don’t recall the exact year, but when I was in high school, I saw a poster that recruited members for the theatrical play club. I took part in it. It was a small-scale play but from that moment on, I developed my passion for plays. I desired to major in theater and film at university, but my father, who was an officer in the military, was strongly against it. Even though I studied business at Hanyang University (HYU), as soon as I entered HYU, I went straight to the theater club to take part. Then, I began to get involved in all-round plays by acting onstage, building stages, writing scripts, and producing performances. I think the lengthy experiences that I had in theater clubs helped me to acquire the know-how to become a CEO and producer.” Q5. When was the toughest time of your life as a producer? Ko: “I think the toughest time was definitely when we went overseas to perform 'Hongdo'. Out of all the international performances, I remember the first one, in China, as the one that I consider unforgettable. It was the first time our crew went abroad for performance, which was why the preparation process, which depended entirely on my abilities, was a burden. From getting visas to controlling the excessive exhilaration of young members, I even remember crying one night in the hotel bed! Aside from this trip, though, the job as a producer is always hard-hitting. The company has to receive financial support from external sponsors, and the concern regarding the successes and failures of each plays are something I must endure every day.” A scene from 'Hongdo', one of the masterpieces of Ko's production. (Photo courtesy of Mabangzen) Q6. Adversely, when was the most memorable moment? Ko: “I feel like I've focused too much on the depressing parts, but there is a reason why I still love my job and theatrical plays. Generally, after the end of each performance, I sit at the back of the room and watch the faces of the audience as they walk out of the venue. When I see their faces explicitly showing awes, I am the happiest person alive then. I didn't foresee the success of our plays internationally. Traditional plays are about Korea and we, the members of Mabangzen, are the bridge that links the our culture and a foreign one. It is arduous, but it brings me joy and great memories.” Q7. What makes theater arts special? Why do you think the public should enjoy watching theatrical plays? Ko: “For me, I loved watching plays because it was like taking a break from mundane life as a student. I used to watch about few hundred plays back in the old days. The funny thing is that I recently watched a blockbuster film at a cinema after years of not watching movies. Honestly, I was shocked to see the spectacular scenes and action that captivated most movie-watchers. That’s when I understood why people go crazy about these films. Even so, plays are not movies or musicals. It has its own 'something' to it. Even for me, it's extremely difficult to say which factors make plays valuable. All I can say is that there is that 'something' that only plays can portray and deliver to the audience. And our job is to continue to seek out the exclusive style of our plays, to let the audience know what plays are all about.” Q8. What are your goals for the future? Ko: “Practically, I want to enhance the quality of plays by improving the conditions of our company members. I am planning on building a villa near Seoul to create an effective practicing space for the entire crew. Members run under tight schedule and to practice in a typical training space requires immense amounts of energy but no time. I think establishing a system like camp training will increase efficiency and teamwork among the members. Other than that, I hope to produce plays that many will enjoy watching." Q9. Any last comments for the readers? Ko: “To be honest, I wasn't a bookish student when I was in college. Even though I majored in business, I attended more of the general classes that included literature and theater arts. Still, I stood strong to my passion and to what I wanted at the time, which naturally led me to where I am today. Right now, I don't know for sure how I will run this company in the next few years. It’s not like I don't have a plan, but usually, nothing happens according to plan. So I think it's important to enjoy the moment you have now and to have full faith in the work you do. We must let our lives flow just like the flow of dialogues in a play.” Under the leadership of Ko, Mabangzen is preparing for a new play. Park Min-young manutdmin@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2016-11 27 Important News

[Alumni]Yoo Seul-gi's Vocal Music and Career

Yoo Seul-gi of the Department of Vocal Music (’10), whose life has been associated with music since the age of four, embarked on his journey of pursuing his career as a vocal singer when he was in middle school. Recently televised through an audition program called Phantom Singer, Yoo drew public attention with his singing abilities and his record- graduating Hanyang University as valedictorian and being the vocal trainer of the famous singer Yoon Min-soo after graduating. The alumnus is looking forward to making vocal music more popular and approachable, as well as becoming a renowned vocal singer himself. Yoo on Phantom Singer After finishing his military service in 2015, Yoo was considering of going abroad for further studies on vocal singing. However, circumstances were not too favorable for him to do so, despite his avidity and eagerness. An alternative option that provided Yoo with what he wanted was the audition program Phantom Singer, which gave him an opportunity to let the public hear his voice. While on air, he performed the music titled ‘Granada’, through which he gave a message: since this song possesses both smooth and tough sensations, Yoo wanted to demonstrate that he is able to manifest both facets at the same time. “It is hard for a soft person to look strong and vice versa. By performing this music, I wanted to show that I have my own unique feature, a mixture of both aspects,” remarked Yoo. ▲ Yoo performing 'Granada' on Phantom Singer “Among a big group of voices, it is essential for me to sort out my own voice, knowing what my best part is,” explained Yoo. In this context, Yoo regards himself as his own rival, distinguishing his voice from the others’. Winning to the final round of the audition, Yoo is determined to make each stage memorable and impressive to the audience, not focusing too much on the outcome. When Yoo was a freshman, he did not think he had a talent for singing. However, on his very first vocal test, he was evaluated as the best student among his peers. It was from that moment that Yoo pushed himself to work harder and do his best, which he did by practicing until late at night every day throughout the six years of his university life. “It is undeniable that people with innate abilities have different starting points and more advantages. Yet I strongly believe that if one has the passion that supports that confidence, they can acquire such a talent,” said Yoo. "While I was at university, I was taught by Professor Kho Sung-hyun, one of the most eminent baritone singers of Korea. I could say that there are traces of his teachings in my singing,” he added. Coaching the famous singer Yoon Min-soo on vocalization is also Yoo's notable task. He became the vocal trainer of Yoon through an acquaint composer who offered Yoo the place. Yoon had never received vocal training before but he insisted on getting lessons from a vocal musician, since vocal music centers on vocalization when producing sounds, signifying considerable help to a singer. “I want to make vocal music more friendly to the public. Compared to popular music, vocal music may feel distant from people, being somewhat unfamiliar to them. Through television programs like Phantom Singer, I hope vocal music draws more attention and becomes more receptive,” noted Yoo. Yoo Seul-gi, the alumnus of 2010, Department of Vocal Music (Photo courtesy of Yoo Seul-gi) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-11 25
2016-11 21 Important News

[Alumni]Creativity Never Sleeps

In a capitalistic society, commercials play a great influence on people’s consumption. Within a film that lasts about 30 to 60 seconds, a commercial gives a certain image to a product or a service. How to make one is a quite complex task and News H asked Kim Jeong-hoon (Theater & Film ‘87), commercial director and the representative of the production group, THE HAPPY about more details. 30 Years Career Devoted to Commercial Making Kim's interest in movies from his years of middle school grew large enough to apply to the Department of Theater & Film of Hanyang University (HYU). Kim mentioned how he was eagle to study movies more in depth. As it was his major, Kim was more associated with activities related to plays and movies than advertising. “I was deeply into plays. During my years at the university. I experienced various roles in plays, from acting, planning, to directing,” said Kim. ▲ Kim is currently the representative of the production company, THE HAPPY. As he was very much devoted to studying movies and plays, his life was irrelevant to commercials until he graduated. “I was even planning to apply to foreign university to study further about the field but little shortage of scores needed was bugging me at the time,” said Kim. It was rather a radical choice for Kim to apply for a producer (PD) position at a commercial agency at his 4th year, when he had to make a decision about his future. Although it was highly competitive to take the postion as it was desired by a lot of the advertisement majors, Kim proudly passed 6 exams and interviews to make a first step in his commercial career. “I think I was able to adjust well as producing commercials share common essence with making movies and plays. They both require ‘creativity’. The name of the two work is different, but people in both fields are ultimately trying to ‘create’ something in ways that is out of the box,” explained Kim. Starting from the PD, Kim’s career steadily went on the rise as he later become a major directors in two different commercial agencies. Finally at 1996, Kim decided to move out from his last company and to establish his own production company, THE HAPPY, which remarked its peak in his 30 years career. Magic through Logic The company is composed of Kim, as a representative director, and several employees, which is smaller than some of the big agencies. “I wanted my work environment to be flexible and free by keeping it small. That is why I decided to make my own company. I, myself do work when I am willing to, so I wanted to provide free and comfortable working environment for my employess as well," said Kim. While the company’s working environment is free and flexible, it does not mean the job is without any stress. Kim said that his daily cycle is mainly composed of brainstorming. “To me, advertisement is like 24 hours. Every day, every moment, I think about advertisement. How to make it and to direct it. I even did a presentation in front of advertisers in my sleep. The psychiatrist I visited 5 years ago explained to me that my light sleep shows how stressful I can be before important meetings,” said Kim. ▲ The photo on the left (front row), is the most recent ad 'Hot Hot' which was a great hit. On its left was the ad that featured public campaign. The bottom two ads were among the most popular ones as well, which popularized tropical fruit drinks (right) to kids soda drinks (left). (Photo courtesy of THE HAPPY production) Even though being a commercial director can be one of the stressful jobs in the world, Kim said he is still enjoying his job as it is adventurous. “To me, there is no one commercial to consider at a certain period. When it is the busiest time of the month, I even had to plan 19 ads simultaneously,” said Kim. There are various commercials Kim have directed. It ranges from food, drinks to public campaigns. Kim said one of the key priority to consider when he is directing, is perfect planning. “I try hard not to make any exceptions when I am filming. When filming the scene with actors and other staffs, I consider it a process of ‘editing’. I draw all the scenes in my head and follow it exactly,” said Kim. “Every scenes should be made with logic, it is made due to significant reason agreed by the whole team beforehand.” In the New Era of Advertisement There were several turning points in his 30 years career but Kim said one of the most important time is now. “A lot of the advertisement nowadays is changing its form into mobile ads, which spreads quicker. As the change is quite vast, a lot of the domestic commercial directors tend to work with foreign companies because of the lack of the number of conventional ads they can work on,” explained Kim. Kim said it is important to jump on the new bandwagon to survive in the field. “Old days were good, but I think change is what makes one improve oneself.” “Moreover, I could be one of the oldest among commercial directors. There are a lot of directors quitting because of their age, but I don’t think creativity is something that is confined to one’s age,” said Kim. “Creativity never sleeps, one of my goal is film in the day of my 60th birthday party.” ▲ Kim's passion toward advertisement will be continued. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2016-11 20

[Alumni]Park Myung-hoon, the Chief Composer of Korean Symphony Orchestra

The Korean Symphony Orchestra is one of the most renowned orchestra in the country with a history of about 30 years. Many talented musicians have been a member of it to represent Korean classical and modern music. A position in the Orchestra is highly coveted by young musicians. Last month in October, Park Myung-hoon (Department of Composition ‘05) has been appointed as chief composer in the Korean Symphony Orchestra (hereafter “the Orchestra”). As his first, the gifted composer will receive an honor of creating a song that will be played by the Orchestra between 2018 and 2019. It is truly a point of pride for Hanyang University (HYU), especially for the college of music and News H interviewed Park to celebrate the great achievement. Q1. How do you feel about being appointed as the chief composer in the Orchestra? Park: “In various Korean orchestras, the system of having a chief composer did not exist until, recently, like 2-3 years ago. It has been difficult for orchestras to fully assign a chief composer in terms of financial and management issues. So, it is an honor for me because there are not many chances to create a song on my own with no holds barred. I think it is a wonderful opportunity in my career and I am very happy about being appointed as the chief composer.” Q2. Can you tell the readers about your specific role as the chief composer? Park: “It is quite simple to be frank because all I have to do is compose a song for the Orchestra to play. It is like a contract where the symphony gives me about one year to complete a song and the orchestra must play the song however I want it to be played. I was given about 30 minutes of time; therefore, my goal would be to concentrate on producing two songs, one song being about 15 minutes, that the Orchestra can perform on stage.” Q3. Are you currently in process of creating the music for the Orchestra? What kind of music do you compose? Park: “I usually compose contemporary music, which is a trend of classical music that started in the early 20th century and continues to this day. It is different from classical music because it adds on the elements of modern music into it. For the Orchestra, I have only mapped out the basic sketch of the two songs. For now, I want the first song to be a piano concerto, music of a piano solo. Other than that, I am still in progress of basic outlining. I have a year given to me, but it is not a long time to create a perfect piece of music, so I need to work harder to complete the song.” ▲ Park has won numerous awards in music composition contests. (Photo courtesy of Park) Q4. We know that you also work as a professor at HYU, what are other works that you do outside of being the chief composer? Park: “Yes. Currently, I give teach “Composition Workshop” at HYU. The lecture is for the seniors and it is mainly about how contemporary music is composed and played in Europe and analyzing why some of that music are not played in Korea. I enjoy teaching the students because I believe that supporting young talented musicians is important in booming up the success of Korean modern music. I also serve as the Artistic Director and Composer in the Ensemble Eins which I have established to promote new contemporary music and give other musicians opportunities to play music in an ensemble. Even though I am extremely busy due to these various work positions, I still enjoy taking part in marvelous groups as a chief composer, director, and professor.” Q5. Can you tell the readers about how your music career began? Park: “I was first involved in music when I was four years old. Like other Koreans of that age, I went to piano school as well as art school. My father was an artist and he wanted me to pursue music because he didn’t want me to go through the difficulties as an artist. While I was playing piano, my interest was more into how the song was made so, I gained composing experiences by participating in music competitions and concours.” Q6. What was it like when you attended HYU? What about when you studied abroad in Germany? Park: “One thing that pops into my head right now is when my friend and I first established a college music club called the Free Composition Group (FCG). It was a club within the college of music to promote song composition and hold annual recitals for the students. We thought active experiences would help the students gain more confidence when all of us step outside the university. The club still exists to this day and it is a strange feeling to see the junior students maintained it for such a long time. After graduation, I studied in Köln, Germany for about 9 years. I really enjoyed the time there because the environment allowed me to freely develop my ability in composition. The friends and professors I have met there encouraged me to find my own color in music.” Q7. What are the most important elements in composing a song? Park: “In any form of art, including music, I think individuality is the most important element. I use the phrase, ‘making it mine,’ a lot with students because a song has innumerable value if it has the composer’s uniqueness imbedded into it. For me, my father’s paintings are my influence for composing a song. This results in a music that only I can create with my own personal experiences. Furthermore, communication is also key in developing the musicians through community connections, peer evaluations, and higher growth. This can produce a piece of work that can not only satisfy the public but also bring out the best in your individuality.” Q8. What is your goal in the future? Park: “I think utmost goal is to simply produce good music for the public to enjoy. I am completely satisfied with where I am now because I want to improve continuously. I remember one my professors in Germany describing one song as being “just you.” I think that is exactly what I want to achieve.” Q9. Do you have any last comments for the readers? Park: “I hear from my students that they are having a tough time with figuring out what to do with life. It is necessary to worry about the financial issues, but I strongly believe having too much concerns on life is not good. One cannot know what it is to work in a field without actually going into the field. Therefore, even though life is difficult and work seems hard, why not try and experience before having too much concern? It will certainly lead you to someplace that you have not expected with more experience.” Some of the songs Park have composed include: “Monta,” “Mach Kein,” and “Seeds” You may listen to his music through videos on YouTube. (←CLICK) ▲ As a chief composer, Park has a set goal ahead of him - producing good music for the public. Park Min-young minyoungpark118@gmail.com Photos by Park Min-young

2016-11 20 Important News

[Academics]Institutionalization of the green certification scheme

Professor Kim Hong-bae of the Department of Urban Planning & Engineering is an expert in the field of urban planning. His paper, “A cost-benefit analysis for the institutionalization of the green certification scheme”, discusses about what would be beneficial when it comes to achieving the green certification. Green certification is the standardized certificate used to prove the suitability of Green technology and products. As for other developed countries, there has been green certifications since the 1990s following the concerns of environmental pollution. For instance, Great Britain has the BREEAM, Japan has CASBEE and United States has the LEED. These institutionalized green certificates are competing to become the world standard. Although Korea now has GBCC, it is not institutionally stabilized compared to other countries yet. Other countries provide the green certification in terms of community, rather than single building itself while Korea is on its way to broadening its spectrum towards giving communities the green certification. ▲ Kim explains about the green certification What is so special about Kim’s paper was that it has provided a deep insight into whether green certification was something that really provides people with benefits in life or not. Through the cost benefit analysis, he has provided the guidelines to how the system would be generally constructed. By providing low carbonizing 45 sectors ranging from industry to policies, Kim has divided the qualification standard and it has its meanings in that social costs and benefits are derived. Most of the standards are very straightforward. However, there are some of the ambiguous points to be digitized into measurements which include pride or self-esteem. Most of the measurements are easier to make for instance, the market value of the house that individuals live in. However, it is hard to show the pride in terms of numerical values to be seen. This is where the contingent valuation method (CVM) comes into action. This explains the “willingness to pay” and digitizes the inherent value inside individuals. ▲ Kim expresses that energy should be saved Some of the studies that Kim is engaged in currently is related to energy harvesting. By recycling the energy wasted into creating a new source of energy, it has its huge meanings. Also, Kim has pointed out a special point in that electric cars do not actually lower the carbon dioxide level nationally. “Although in regions where electric cars operate will show lower signs of carbon dioxide level, the regions where electricity is produced will show greater levels of carbon dioxide which means that nationally, it breaks even,” said Kim. The goal of Kim’s studies leads to one simple logic. In order to achieve low carbon, low energy comes first. The responsibility to saving energy would lead to a lower level of carbon dioxide, which is believed to be one of the worst factors that affect global warming. People need to actively engage in actions such as car sharing or even the smallest actions such as saving water, electricity and the environment as a whole. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-11 20 Important News

[Special]Wisdom in Proverbs

There are hundreds of Korean proverbs, all of which originated from the thoughts-incorporated daily lives of our ancestors, allowing us to take a glimpse of their livelihood. They teach us sympathetic lessons that are applicable in our lives even today, showing deep wisdom and keen insight embedded in our ancestors’ minds. Even though the lifestyle and circumstances changed over centuries, the proverbs inherited from our precursors are still relatable and usable at modern times, put in use of people’s everyday conversation suiting to the situation. Transcending over time, the proverbs have provided us with valuable teachings. Categories of Proverbs Proverbs are often defined as concise and accurate expressions containing wit and wisdom, often derived from ordinary people’s daily lives and experiences. They are formed from abstraction of a particular instance, in which the situation itself becomes a figure of speech that contains a specific meaning or a lesson that corresponds to the situation. According to each situation, proverbs can be largely divided into four types: critical, didactic, experimental, and jocular proverbs. Critical proverbs involve criticizing or admonishing the opponent about their behavior, pinpointing the blunder with the tone of sarcasm or scolding. An exemplary critical proverb would be “a frog forgets about its tadpole days,” meaning someone who stands at a high position belittles those at a lower position, not remembering the fact that they, too, once stood at the same position. This saying contains the teaching that no matter how well your being is, you should not look down upon the others because you are demeaning yourself in the past as well. Moreover, another critical proverb that makes you ponder about your own behavior is “a stool-stained dog rebukes a mud-stained dog.” This proverb aims to condemn those who have big faults yet tries to reproach those with minor faults, reminding them their own places. ▲ "A frog forgets about its tadpole days" Didactic proverb is the most abundant one of all, delivering a teaching as the core meaning. This type is rather instructive than admonishing, setting the truth and affirming what is right or wrong. For example, “knock on the stone bridge before crossing” is underscoring the importance of always being cautious, even with the most easy and familiar task because overlooking an easy task can result in a mistake. Adding on, “downstream can only be clear when upstream is clear” emphasizes the fact that those who set examples have a great impact on those who learns from them, meaning only when they act right will the followers learn good acts. Therefore, it is of their duty to demonstrate good deeds first. Furthermore, “a bull’s horn should be drawn at a breath” gives an advice that a task should not be procrastinated and be carried to action without further do—when a bull’s horn is drawn, heat is applied onto the horn to make the process quick and easy, at least when the heat is still effective, suggesting that the work be done when there is higher energy or will. Moreover, experimental proverbs give a prediction about a situation, based on the occurrence of a similar situation in previous and the lesson derived from it. To exemplify, “a theft brings cramps on his own feet” is a proverb that anticipates a situation, where a person feels too guilty about his own sin that he unintentionally exposes it by himself. This saying is referring to the situation in which someone who committed a bad deed flinches everytime a similar issue is mentioned and acts abnormally, eventually hinting that he is guilty for it. Also, “underneath the lamp is the darkest” predicts that the solution to a problem is not always far away, indicating that you should always be watchful in close approximates. ▲ "Underneath the lamp is the darkest" Lastly, jocular proverbs are expressions that function like similes, by using them as a comparison to a situation. “Pillaging and eating a flea’s liver” is comparable to a situation where someone who is affluent is benefiting from someone who is much underprivileged. Since a flea is an extremely small insect, taking out its liver to eat is pillaging off someone who owns very little, almost exploiting them. Additionally, “licorice in pharmacy” virtually means “an indispensable thing” due to the omnipresence of licorice in any oriental medicine stores. Thus,if something is said to be the licorice in pharmacy, it means that thing is always present in a place or situation. In short, proverbs can be used to describe a situation briefly in one expression or to make a witty comparison. Stemming from the daily lives of our ancestors, each and every proverb conveys a valuable meaning and teaching that we can easily encounter in our daily lives as well. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-11 15 Important News

[Alumni]"Nothing but Music"

Singer-songwriter Gaho, Lim Ji-sun (Department of Dance, ’09), is a singer who sings love in a calm yet very sophisticated voice. One of the rising artists in Hongdae, Lim was in fact a dancer for about 20 years in the past. She started dancing from a very young age and thought she would naturally follow the path of being a member of a dance company like a lot of her friends. For Lim, choosing to write and sing songs was more than merely switching her major but was following her belief about what was right. It required enough courage for her to do so. Lim definitely had many ups and downs in the past 5 years since she started to officially work as a singer-songwriter. Her stage name Gaho, meaning blessing of God, shows how much she hoped for the best of luck since she started to make music as a career. Delivering Love Stories in Tranquility Lim officially started her career as a singer-songwriter in 2011, two years after she graduated Hanyang University (HYU). “When I was in my 4th year, I felt much doubt about my major. I could easily foresee the ‘reality’ of becoming a dancer- that my abilities wouldn't be up to becoming a successful dancer. I wasn’t 100% sure that I could neglect that fact,” said Lim. After graduation, Lim wanted to give herself some time to ponder about her life and career. Her first obstacle came with tinnitus, an ear malfunction that made her hear ringing and buzzing sounds that only she could hear. “I was diagnosed with a sudden sensorineural hearing loss that occurred due to stress.” With a stage name Gaho, Lim is currently performing in small concert halls in Hong dae. “Despite this, I was still interested in singing and music. I was deep into indie music and was a huge fan of the Korean singer, Nell. He inspired me to sing my own story,” said Lim. Her condition deterred her from working the best she could. Lim could only rely on sounds that were louder than 120 decibels. “I had to solely depend on loud beats that was made by drums to sing and play piano along with it. After about 6 months of working as a singer, I found that I could slowly but more clearly hear sounds better. I thought it was a miracle. I remember myself crying from pleasant surprise.” Currently, she can only hear sounds with her right ear but is trying to retain the current status with constant care and medication. Step by Step Making music was just a hobby for her at first, as she had a very shallow knowledge of music and composition. Lim’s method of composition began from recording melodies of her humming and then transforming it to a score with the help of her friends who majored in music. “I knew it was a rather reckless choice for me to take as a means of living, but singing and writing songs soon became the biggest motivation and joy of my life,” said Lim. After releasing about four albums and digital singles, Lim was faced with another stumbling block. “I felt insecure about my career. I was at the end of my 20s, and I saw all my other friends getting married and settling down unlike myself. I was afraid that my career wasn’t going to be able to support my living,” said Lim. Such thoughts almost led her to make her 5th album ‘I will only cry for 4 minutes’ as her last one. “I thought that album would be the last, but I was lucky enough to find a company that was willing to support my music production.” After a contract with a music label, Lim could concentrate more on her work with less financial burden that she had had before. Lim became more confident about her music and also became more professional with sessions and bands that came along with her in her performances. 'Your Night' is her upcoming lullaby album, and 'Suddenly' was her most recent album. (Photos courtesy of Gaho) Derived From Real Experiences “A lot of my songs were written from my own experience, which recorded thoughts and feelings when I was heartbroken because of my relationship with my lover,” said Lim. As she tends to work when her emotional state is most intense, Lim mentioned she usually works with her other musician friends late at night. Among her songs that express complex emotions after breakups, there is one that is noticeably bright. “The song ‘Do you feel the same?’ was the song I wrote when I met a guy from Sweden in Korea. He invited me to Sweden with his own expense and traveling to Sweden with a person I cared a lot about was one of the most delightful moments in my life. I recorded melodies and lyrics, and made a song out it when I came back to Korea.” After Lim’s most recent album ‘Suddenly’ that was released in September, she is currently working on a new album that is to be released in December. ‘Your Night’ will be an album with four lullaby songs for adults. “I hope my songs could lead people to fall asleep well by releasing the stress they had that day,” said Lim. Also, Lim is undergoing steady vocal training to improve her singing skills and voice to become a better musician. “I know I have a lot of points to improve on, and I am willing to do so to become a musician that can impose a strong impression on people,” concluded Lim. Lim advised HYU students to have the courage to step out of their 'comfort zone' for more freedom and possibilities. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2016-11 14

[Event]Students Volunteer for Caretakers

On November 9th, a special event called 'Sipsi-ilak' was held by Sipsi-ilbab, a school volunteering organization, along with the Hanyang University Volunteer Corps (HYUVC) to provide a session where the janitors and cleaners of Hanyang University (HYU) could have a pleasant meal together and watch the Arirang concert. This was special in that this event was held during the working hours of the caretakers and students were voluntarily working in those hours on behalf of them. ▲ Caretakers are enjoying their meal (Photo courtesy of Sipsi-ilbab) How it all came together Vice chairman of Sipsi-ilbab, Park Hyun-ah (Business, Master’s program) claimed that the purpose of this event was to understand the caretakers as a part of the HYU organization and have a moment of gratitude towards them. “They are a crucial part of making the school a much cleaner and safer place. Yet not many students realize this nor do they have any interests towards them,” said Park. As for this event, 42 students have applied to work on behalf of caretakers, where they have been split into 43 school buildings to do cleaning and recycling work. Since the cleaners left only the easy tasks for students, there were not much they were required to do and 21 teams were formed into groups of two students to take care of two buildings. Prior to the event, students were educated on which buildings they would be in charge of and which tasks they were required to do. ▲ A student volunteer is cleaning the bathroom (Photo courtesy of Sipsi-ilbab) Although this event was held last year as well by HYU, this is the first time that Sipsi-ilbab has collaborated. “We were planning on this event last year as well but due to financial and time issues, this is the first time that we have participated,” said Park. Last year, there was no student volunteering participation but with the help of Sipsi-ilbab, this event has become even more special compared to last year. About 200 caretakers were able to enjoy themselves to eat meat soup prepared by HYUVC and Sipsi-ilbab. Feelings towards one another As for the student volunteering representative, Yoon Hee-sung (Business, 1st year) presented some of the things that he has learned and felt during the event. “Since we were only doing a small proportion of the tasks done by the caretakers for an hour, it did not burden us in any way. However, coming to think of them working around all over the campus on every floor, it seemed to be too much,” Yoon said. “Although it seems very reasonable that hygiene is kept to a high level, without the cleaners, it would become dirty in a matter of time. We should be thankful of them and actively participate to be of help,” Yoon added. ▲ "We should be more thankful and actively participate to be of help to other people" (Photo courtesy of Sipsi-ilbab) The caretakers of HYU were also grateful for the event as well. During an interview with two cleaners (Jeon Young-suk and Lee Seok-suk), they wanted to say a few words towards those who have worked hard to prepare this event. “This seems to be a great event. I thank the students and school who have provided us with this great opportunity,” said Jeon. “As for those students who have worked on behalf of us, we give out special thanks and we just hope that recycling is done properly by people,” Jeon added. “I have participated in the event last year and it is great to be back. Cleaning is not something that students would have experienced often and it is so nice of them to step in and do the work for us,” said Lee. They have both voiced out that as their work is for the good of many, they are happy to be working for HYU. Events like this provide a valuable lesson for many to step into other people’s shoes and think in their positions. Park said that Sipsi-ilbab will try to keep collaborating with HYU to hold this event every year. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr