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2020-08 03

[Faculty][ERICA’s Power]Department of Transportation and Logistics Engineering Professor Lee Gun-woo, who Returns to His Alma

From student to professor! Transportation expert returns to his university Professor Lee Gun-woo in the Department of Transportation and Logistics (Department of Transportation Engineering, Class of '96) Professor Lee Gun-woo, who was appointed at the beginning of the year as a professor in the College of Engineering Sciences' Department of Transportation and Logistics, set out for a new challenge. He has come back to his alma mater, where he spent his college years actively participating in school clubs and the student council, as a professor. Let’s meet Professor Lee, who says that he will be faithful to education and research by maintaining communication with students at his alma mater. ▲ Professor Lee Gun-woo in the Department of Transportation and Logistics Engineering (Department of Transportation Engineering, Class of '96) Looking forward to meeting his students as his juniors and as pupils Professor Lee Gun-woo, who was appointed last March is an alumnus of the ERICA Department of Transportation Engineering, class of '96. After graduating from MIT and finishing his studies at the University of California, Irvine, he has been responsible for research in shipping, harbors, and international distribution for five years at the Korea Maritime Institute (KMI). In 2007, he worked as a professor in Chung-ang University's Department of International Logistics and came back to his alma mater this year as a professor in ERICA's Department of Transportation and Logistics Engineering. “The Department of International Logistics is affiliated with the College of Business and Economics, which has economics as its base. Because my academic background is in engineering, there were some disparities. There have been limits to practicing 100% of what I have studied until now. Just in time, I was able to transfer thanks to a request from my alma mater, Hanyang University.” His goals are unique as it is his first year working as a professor at his former school. Although working at the university he graduated from feels comfortable, there is more pressure from the thought of needing to lead his students, who are both his juniors in school and his pupils. Unfortunately, however, he is not yet able to have face-to-face classes with his students due to COVID-19. Even though his teaching is being done online, he simultaneously felt both comfort and anxiety when conducting his first lecture. “I could not foresee to what extent students would be able to follow along. There was also the problem of online lectures. The saddest thing is that I do not get to meet the students. It is unfortunate that I cannot meet them in person, communicate with them, get feedback on what they do not understand, and help them understand better. After all, there are limits to listening to what students think through email and phone calls.” The preparation process for online lectures is also quite burdensome. It takes about twice as long to prepare materials, record the lectures, edit, and upload them. There are sometimes situations when errors occur, such as his voice not being heard due to microphone errors. While this is not familiar work, he is gradually adapting to it through trial and error. ▲ Professor Lee Gun-woo is leading a research project in Transportation and Green Logistics through the Sustainable Transportation and Logistics Laboratory Concentrating on sustainable transportation environment and green logistics Hanyang University's Department of Transportation Engineering was first established in Korea in 1988. The pride of the alumni are so great as well. It was reorganized into the current Department of Transportation and Logistics Engineering by emphasizing the role of logistics in 2012. The subject which Professor Lee Gun-woo teaches is in the field of logistics. Similar to transportation, logistics has multidisciplinary characteristics. Perspectives change according to the point of view. In humanities logistics expands on the basis of trade, and in industral engineering and transportation engineering it expands into the field of engineering. Professor Lee is lecturing in the current department on "Transportation Logistics Economics" and "Sustainable Transportation and Green Logistics" in graduate school. From the second semester, he will provide lectures on "Logistics Management Engineering," "Logistics Systems Design," and "Special Lectures on Logistics." In the "Sustainable Transportation and Logistics Laboratory" that he is operating, students conduct research on the transportation environment and green logistics. Public health research includes atmosphere pollution emission estimation research, atmosphere diffusion analysis research, research on the effects of air pollution on humans, public convenience and ripple effects of transportation management techniques, and transportation logistics eco-friendly policies. It also includes effect analysis research on the introduction of new technology in the transportation and logistics field, such as eco-friendly transportation systems like electric cars and autonomous vehicles. According to Professor Lee, “It is research favored by the public but not government officials or businesses.” However, the interest and importance of this field will increase as international societies emphasizing eco-friendliness such as green-house gas reduction. Professor Lee’s most memorable achievement among all his research is receiving the Pyke-Johnson Award which is awarded in the transportation planning and environmental field as one of the five academic awards givem by the US Transportation Research Board. At the end of his PH.D program in 2010, he was awarded for his first SCI paper. He said that “it was the result of the help of Professor Stephen G. Richie who led his doctoral program, an excellent education provided by the department professors, and his fellow colleagues who participated in the doctoral program.” The Pyke-Johnson Award is the oldest award and has the highest authority in the transportation field, which can even be called an honor to one’s family. At that time, his award became a big issue in his college because it was the first award in the 30 years in the department. ▲ Professor Lee Gun-woo, who set his first step as a professor, senior, and teacher this year in ERICA showed his unique goal Educating the right expert with skill and humanity The changes to the ERICA Campus are truly amazing compared to when he first came to the school 24 years ago. To a great extent, the changes could be called "convulsions of nature." Professor Lee was amazed at the scenery and said, “The campus landscape is well organized, with many new buildings,” and that he "can feel the school’s enormous development in my skin.” Then, what was his most memorable experience when looking back at his college years? He choses "treet cafes" as the answer. The first words of his colleagues was the same when they heard he was appointed as a professor at his alma. “It has become a memory that I cannot forget now. When I was in school, there were lots of potholes on concrete pavers in front of the main entrance because it was a time when school peripheries were not yet developed. There, we collected branches and made campfires. Then we drank, sang, and debated with colleagues and our seniors.” One strength of Hanyang members that he has experienced and observed is their diligence. There is a tendency to overcome difficulties instead of running away from them. This is one of the reasons why numerous alumni are actively working in unimaginable fields all over the world. What he emphasizes to his students as their school senior and as their professor is humanity. Professor Lee underscores that he wishes "to educate proper experts with great humanity” and that “one can be responsible for their position if they were told that they have a great capacity for humanity.” That is why he helps students with etiquette and manners that are needed in social lives such as writing emails that do not convey rudeness. “Sometimes, I receive two-line emails without indicating one’s identity like sending a text message. Most of the time, it would be the case that students do not know how, but in real society that should not be done. In the past, I have shown students' emails as examples of etiquette. Since then, the students’ emails have changed. I try to teach these small but important factors to students whenever I have time.” He plans to talk more about students’ future careers. That is because of what his professor told him was of great help when he was a university student. “I want students to have their own dreams. While in university, I want them to find what they like and live a life that does not make them give up their dream.” Professor Lee highlights that he will be more faithful to education and research as a new professor. He plans on making opportunities to contribute to society when professional advice or an opinion on the transportation and logistics field is needed. We look forward to his future achievements and are cheering for his new start at his alma mater. Written by Oh In-sook Photo by Ha Ji-kwon This article is published in the ‘HY ERICA’ 2020 Summer Edition Click to see HY ERICA 2020 Summer Edition (Volume 95) Click to see ‘HY ERICA’ in [[Hanyang Wiki]] Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Park Gyeong-min

2020-07 29

[Faculty][ERICA's Innovation] A Healthy Society Comes from Healthy Communication, Professor Lee Byung-kwan, Department of Advertising & Public Relations

A healthy society comes from health communication, Professor Lee Byung-kwan, Department of Advertising & Public Relations The world is going through chaos because of the COVID-19 pandemic. In times like this, accurate communication is essential. Professor Lee Byung-kwan, a first-generation health communication researcher in Korea, warned that it would be difficult to overcome the crisis if rapid and active communication is not conducted. ▲Professor Lee Byung-kwan, Department of Advertising & Public Relations WIth COVID-19, what is the role of communication? The Wall Street Journal highlighted Jeong Eun-kyung's consistent honesty, information-based analysis, and composure as powerful calmatives for Koreans. Professor Lee Byung-kwan, a health communication expert, gave a positive assessment from a different perspective. "Epidemiologists and medical professionals tend to only deliver the threats of diseases scientifically and objectively. However, the public cares more about the dangers that they present to individuals and their families. Unlike previous infectious diseases, they have fully understood the needs of the public and have been conveying information that the public is curious about." Having said this, Professor Lee praised the quarantine authorities for giving briefings every single day since the outbreak of COVID-19. Delivery of accurate information is important to prevent the public from being biased against fake news. This phenomenon is called the "Negative Dominance Model." "During a pandemic, the government should manage two things at the same time. One is quarantine, and the other is the delivery of accurate information via communication. Otherwise, the public will overestimate the threat and get anxious. On the contrary, they may underestimate the threat and react negligently." A very good example of social panic occured during the MERS and swine flu outbreaks. Fake news that spreads excessive fear and anxiety during a pandemic is another virus that needs to be eradicated. ▲ Professor Lee Byung-kwan is putting forth efforts to strengthen students' abilities to foster sincere social skills Building a Platform to Discuss Domestic Health Communication Professor Lee Byung-kwan's research field is health communication. It is the field of exploring communication strategies to enhance the health of our society. In other words, it is a field of communication that "provides information", " influences others", "provides motivation", as well as "reflects attitude and behavior", and "strengthens competence" in relation to the health of individuals and society. There are many topics that directly relate to the health of individuals and society, such as treatments and responses to problems like AIDS, obesity, drunk-driving, dating violence, smoking, and so on. Politics and medical and pharmaceutical industries are also included. Although the research field is diverse, we are able to see that all these topics are closely related to our lives. Over the past decade, the importance of health communication has been increasing alongside diseases like swine flu and MERS. However, ten years ago, Korea did not have a platform for health communication. In fact, Professor Lee Byungkwan was only able to encounter the field of health communication when he was in America for further studies but did not pay much attention to it. However, he got interested in this field while conducting research on AIDS and family planning campaigns in Africa with his advisor. For this, he is very grateful to his advisor. ▲What is Health Communication? "The good thing about health communication research is that the subject and target of the study are not abstract. They are real and clear. I also have a little sense of pride that I am able to help in solving health-related problems." After returning to Korea, Lee, together with other professors, started a Health Communication Research Association which later became an official academic association in 2009 with Lee serving as the first Chairman. He also received a commendation for serving as an advisor to the AIDS/Tuberculosis Advisory Committee from the Disease Control and Prevention Center. Professor Lee Byung-kwan's field of interest is the evaluation of the effectiveness of various disease-related campaigns. Holding campaigns is important but calculating the impact of these campaigns is equally important. Last year, Lee offered a solution to measure the actual impact for a tuberculosis campaign which required the largest budget in Korea after smoking. "To measure the effectiveness of the campaign, we need to measure the behavior changes before and after exposure to the campaign. However, our daily routines are uncontrolled, which makes it difficult to assess the changes accurately. Hence, these methodological limitations should be overcome by statistical algorithms for more accurate results. The recent research studies have reflected this interest." In relation to this, Professor Lee published an evaluation of the tuberculosis campaign impact in one of the medical journals called the International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. Currently, Professor Lee is carrying out a research study on Bayesian structural time-series mode algorithms to measure the impact anti-smoking campaigns have had over the last 5 years. ▲Professor Lee Byung-kwan, who served as the first president of the Korea Health Communication Association, is being credited for leading the development of health communication in Korea. Finding worth in the community Professor Lee Byung-kwan worked as a member of National Committee in Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response in 2015 when MERS broke out and paid close attention to live social media messages. At that time, Lee was establishing a system to monitor social media data in real-time by using machine learning techniques when MERS broke out, giving Professor Lee the chance to help prevent the spread of MERS while collecting and analyzing the public's opinion at the same time. He also advised the Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response team to monitor social media data steadily during the outbreak of COVID-19. As such, Professor Lee showed interest in data science that uses machine learning or AI as a method to study health communication. "Students who study social science tend to think that they are not real 'scientists,' but social science requires a scientific approach to explain social phenomena. Therefore, I always oppose arguments that are abstract and emphasize that students think theoretically with evidence." Professor Lee mentioned that studying health communication makes him naturally interested in medical services. He conducted an Industry Coupled Problem Based Learning (IC-PBL) project at Ansan Medical Welfare Social Cooperative last year. From conducting cooperative and community health communication cooperation classes with students, innovative ideas were found. To contricute to the community, Lee plans to create an "Ansan City Health Map" that provides health indicators for local members in Ansan. Written by: Park Young-im Photos by: Ha Ji-kwon This information was published in Hanyang University Newsletter "HY ERICA Summer Issue 2020 (No.95)" ▶ HY ERICA summer issue 2020 (No.95) ▶ Know more about HY ERICA at [[HYUWIKI]] Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Lee Hee-jin

2020-07 27

[Faculty][ERICA’s Keyword] Ranked 6th in the World Among Experts in the Field of Marine Biomedical Research, Department of Marine Science and Convergence Engineering Chair-professor Kim Se-kwon

Continuous and passionate steps of the 6th ranked expert in the field of marine biomedical research Professor Kim Se-kwon of the Department of Marine Science and Convergence Engineering “There is nothing in this world that is achieved without pain. It is sometimes painful to achieve answers to certain things like studying, research, and work, but your efforts will eventually bear fruit if you concentrate with passion.” Professor Kim Se-kwon was awarded the International Scientist Award at the 33rd International Khwarizmi Awards Ceremony this year, which centers around world-class scientists. He was also selected as the 6th ranked expert in the field of marine biomedical research from the US medical field research paper evaluation organization. Let's think about what passion is through the story of Professor Kim Se-kwon, who is gaining worldwide recognition for his expertise and influence. ▲ Hanyang University ERICA Department of Marine Science and Convergence Engineering Chair-professor Kim Se-kwon Q1. As the chair-professor of Hanyang University ERICA's Department of Marine Science and Convergence Engineering, in which classes do you meet students? A1. The Department of Marine Science and Convergence Engineering deals with understanding and preserving future Earth environmental changes and the fast-changing characteristics of the marine environment in response to the national advancement of marine development-related technologies. I've decided to give two lectures to freshmen this year. The topic of the first lecture is "Know the ocean to see the future: Marine living resources that bring money from the 4th industrial revolution" and the second lecture is "Healthcare utilizing marine biological resources." I've also had presentation and debate sessions with graduate school students on the topic of "Exploring and developing physiologic substances from marine biological resources." Q2. Over the past 10 years you have published about 200 research papers regarding marine organisms in SCI-level international journals. What have you been researching about marine organisms? A2. In China, there is an antique pharmaceutical book called Chinese Herbal Medicine (華本草, 13 volumes) that is similar to Korea's Dong-uibogam. This book deals with biological resources, descriptions, and effects that have been used as medicines in China, and it identifies about 200 marine organisms that were used as medicines 500 years ago. However, because of the abrupt development of medical plant domestication technologies, fewer than 10 marine organism species are currently being used. I published a book called Marine Organisms and Herbal Medicine based on the information on the marine organisms that were written about as medicinal herbs in Chinese Herbal Medicine. Moreover, Korea imports most herbal medicinal materials from China, but it was revealed that their pesticide pollution is very serious. This is why I started research into creating herbal medicine materials(bio new medicine) from marine waters, which exists in our sea and is an untapped resource. I mostly examined the vitality by separating new natural materials from marine organisms, disclosed their structures, and sought to discover their application methods by realizing the effect mechanisms. As a result, I could discover diverse vitalizations such as anticancer, anti-aging, anti-allergy, anti-dementia, antidiabetes, and antihypertensive uses. Q3. You received an International Scientist Award at the 33rd International Khwarizimi Awards in February and also the 2019 Best Paper Award at the world-class journal in marine biomedical sciences field Marine Drugs. A3. The International Khwarizimi Award is an award that was established by the Iranian government in 1987 in honor of Muhammad Ibn-Musa al-Khwarizmi (770-840 CE), the first Persian mathematician and astronomer to establish the concept of algebra. It is an international award that selects award-winning journals of science and technology through the support of diverse international organizations such as UNESCO. A professor at the Iran Institute of Science and Technology read some of my research papers, became interested, and nominated me for a Khwarizmi Award. I did not expect to be awarded but was given the pleasure of winning the award. Different from other winners, I had other 4-day award schedules. So, I participated in invited lectures at the Iran Institute of Science and Technology and the Iran Institute of Ocean Science and Technology. Also, I was asked to give an advisory opinion by the SAFF Offshore Industries Company and discuss mutual cooperation methods. The reason why I received the Best Paper Award from Marine Drugs was due to the review paper that suggested the possibility of utilizing protein and peptides in the processing of residues that are thrown away after marine products are processed as functional cosmetic materials. I am aware that I was selected as the winner because the paper quotation rate was high worldwide. I am happy that I am gaining international recognition for the efforts I have made and results that I have found. Q4. Was there a special reason why you became interested in the marine bio-field? A4. In the ocean, there are about 300,000 species that amount to 80% of all animal species on earth, but more than 96% are unused resources. Some maritime states that are close to the ocean, along with some developed countries, are showing a trend of shifting the subjects of biomaterial development from land resources to unused marine animals. Korea, which is surrounded on three sides by ocean and holds maritime jurisdiction that is 4.5 times larger than its territory, has abundant maritime resources, but unfortunately is not using them properly. About 40 years ago when I started my research, only a scarce amount of resources such as fish and marine algae (seaweed, laver, kelp) were used as food sources, and other living marine resources were not used. There wasn't even basic research being conducted on marine organisms. Therefore, I established the Marine Biochemistry Research Laboratory and progressed with research in order to effectively use living marine organisms. Since then I have explored numerous marine organisms for new functional substances and disclosed their functions. Such research must be undertaken to utilize living marine organisms in diverse ways. Since systemic research through biotechnology is in an insufficient state, much pain and effort were required to overcome this problem. ▲ Professor Kim Se-kwon was awarded the International Scientist Award at the 33rd International Khwarizimi Awards Ceremony this year and was ranked 6th among world-class experts in the marine biomedical field by the US medical field research paper evaluation organization. Q5. You were selected 5 years in a row as the Highly Cited Researchers(HCR) in the world by the Global Academic Information Enterprise and were selected last May as the 6th (Top 0.0075%) highest ranking world-class expert in the biomedical sciences field by the US medical field research paper evaluation organization. A5. I have spent time as a professor with three obligations in my mind as a scholar. First, to teach students well, second, performing creative research, and third, providing help to humanity with research outcomes. I have never considered myself an extraordinary person. Therefore, I thought I should put forth a lot of effort as I do not have enough capabilities. I have received good results by doing my best and being focused on my work. Q6. You have published about 40 professional books in English regarding the marine bio field. A6. When I was a visiting professor at Memorial University in Canada in 1999, I came to know a professor who had published about 60 books as an editor and works worldwide. I once suggested we publish a book in my field as joint-editors, but unfortunately this wasn't achieved. So, after a lot of thinking, I decided to publish on my own. Luckily, I had experience evaluating many publication plans for foreign publishers, thus could publish my first English professional books in the CRC Press, which is a famous publisher in the US. This gave me confidence, which let me publish more than 40 books after receiving publication requests from many publishers. Q7. You have strived with ongoing passion in research, paper presentation, and book publishing. Do you have your own special know-how? A7. I have made more efforts and focused on my work than any other by constantly thinking about my lack of abilities. Because of this, I gained confidence and built an attitude to try out anything with confidence. In fact, it takes a lot of courage from people with degrees in Korea to publish English professional papers. Regardless, I eventually did it. I don’t think there is a special know-how in anything. Q8. Do you think marine convergence engineering and the marine bio field will play a big role in future society? A8. There needs to be a collective scientific approach in order to manage the ocean environment, protect marine resources, and use them valuably for humanity. Therefore, marine convergence engineering will be of more importance in the future. Moreover, in the case of Korea, which is surrounded on three sides by ocean, the marine bio field that uses marine living organisms will grow into a new power industry for the nation. Q9. Do you have anything to say about passion to ERICA members and young researchers? A9. I remember the four elements of happiness that contemporary people must hold, suggested by one author. One, language studies, two, building academic knowledge, three, playing instruments, and four, enjoying sports. When looking closely at these four elements of happiness, they all require pain and passion in order to be achieved. It reminds us of "no pain, no gain." Although there will be painful aspects to researching, working, and trying to find answers, the time you get to feel happy will come faster if you focus on your work with passion. Now, diverse opportunities for growth will come in technologically innovative businesses along with the 4th industrial revolution. In technical innovation, creative research is necessary. So, you must put passion into developing your creative research capabilities. That will be the key to solving your worries about employment or startups. ▲ ‘2019 Best Paper Awards’ by Marine Drugs Chair-professor Kim Se-kwon and marine biomedical sciences Marine biomedical sciences is a field that explores medical usability of physiologic abilities of marine living organisms. Professor Kim Se-kwon, who is a world-renowned marine biomedical expert, continued his research on disclosing the various effects of marine living organisms in fields such as anticancer, anti-aging, anti-dementia, anti-obesity, and anti-diabetes. He recently received the 2019 Best Paper Awards from the global journal Marine Drugs. Production by Kim Hyun-ji Materials/photos by Professor Kim Se-kwon This content is published in 2020 Summer Edition (Volume 95) of ‘HY ERICA’, a Hanyang University newsletter ▶ Click to see HY ERICA 2020 Summer Edition (Volume 95) ▶ Click to see in detail ‘HY ERICA’ in [[Hanyang Wiki]] Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Park Gyeong-min

2020-07 27

[Alumni]The Winner of Phantom Singer 3 and the Legendary Tenor, Yoo Chae-hoon

Hanyang University’s college of music has been a home to numerous influential musicians in South Korea. Yoo Chae-hoon (Department of Voice, '07) is also a proud alumnus of Hanyang and a famous tenor. His singing gained media coverage in Trot X, Who Does Better, and most recently, Phantom Singer 3, the TV audition show where Yoo won the championship on July 3, 2020. Entering the Department of Voice Yoo found his dream to become an opera singer thanks to his middle school teacher who, after seeing him perform as a vocalist for the school band, recommended that he major in opera. Following the recommendation, he was later accepted to Pohang Arts High School, where he continued to hone his opera singing skills. His unique strength of not being afraid to perform on stage and fearlessly challenging high pitches positioned him as the top student when he entered Hanyang University. Yoo recalled Hanyang University as “where he found his musical roots.” During his university life, which was full of practices, lessons, and lectures, he said he thought it was "the coolest thing" to leave the practice room as the last out of all his friends. His most remarkable memory was staying until 10:30 p.m. every day when the practice room closed. Phantom Singer 3 In April 2020, his singing shone in the music audition TV show the Phantom Singer 3. In the show, Yoo was complimented as the tenor who could perfectly cover all genres of music, earning him the nickname of "the legendary tenor." Yoo Jae-hoon (Department of Voice, '07) performing "Il Mondo" on Phantom Singer 3. The clip of his singing gained 2.1 million views on Youtube. (Photo courtesy of JTBC) When asked which stage was the most memorable for him during the audition, Yoo picked the final stage during which he sang The Rose. “I sang of my intention to devote myself to the love and attention my fans have given me,” said Yoo. Ending the show and taking first place with 200,000 text votes and 150,000 online votes, Yoo said he had never imagined winning, and wanted to take this opportunity to yet again thank all his fans for cheering for him through the final stage. (Left) Yoo, with his team La Poem, sang on the final stage of Phantom Singer 3. (Photo courtesy of Yoo) Yoo is currently preparing for the Phantom Singer gala concert and its tour schedules. Also, La Poem is anticipating an album release in September. As for the future roads of his younger colleagues in the Department of Voice, Yoo said he would like to advise them that “students need to never give up and give everything their best efforts.” Lee Yoon-seo cipcd0909@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-06 29

[Alumni]A Crossover of Traditional and Contemporary Music

Traditional music in Korea is called gugak, which literally means “national music” in Korean. However, as the trends of Western music have been sweeping the music industry for more than half a century, most Koreans feel a sense of distance from traditional music. Ha Yun-ju (Department of Korean Traditional Music, '09) is a Jeongga (a kind of gugak which involves vocal singing) singer who is trying to popularize traditional music through a musical crossover with Western music. Ha Yun-ju (Department of Korean Traditional Music, '09) is a Jeongga singer who is trying to popularize the traditional music of Korea through a crossover with contemporary music. (Photo courtesy of Ha) Ha explained Jeongga as a genre that engrafts music and literature which used to be enjoyed by the upper-classes. “Jeongga reveals a taste for the arts as it leads to inner peace from its slow and steady melody,” said Ha. She added that Jeongga provides a mystic experience by filling in the emptiness of people with lyrical and instructive messages. After entering Hanyang with a full scholarship, Ha started to lay the foundation for her competence as a musician. “Each lesson with the professors helped me grow to be able to meet the standards to survive in the actual field,” said Ha. With the professors’ support as well as her efforts, Ha won the Gold Prize in the 27th Onnara Gugak Competition. However, Ha aspires to more than just mastering Jeongga. She is especially interested in familiarizing other people with this beautiful traditional music. Ha chose a crossover between traditional music and contemporary music as the medium. Upon receiving the KBS Gugak Award in 2018, Ha released her first full-length studio album, Chuseon, which means “a fan in autumn." The album featured contemporary songs sung in the style of Jeongga, expressing the loneliness of a woman saying farewell to her loved one. In addition, Ha is participating in various collaborations with contemporary pop musicians including Kim Junsu, Song So-hee, and Second Moon. Ha feels that she has been tasked with certain responsibilities as a traditional musician, and the crossover is a way of fulfilling them. Chuseon is Ha's first full-length studio album which expresses the loneliness of a woman saying farewell to her loved one. (Photo courtesy of Ha) Other than the crossover, Ha has been involved in diverse projects to popularize traditional music. The Jeongga singer recently released a collection of children's songs after appearing in Who Is Good at This, a singing contest program for children. Ha is preparing to release another full-length album, The Point of Ecstasy, with the poems of Na Tae-ju. Ha also plans to participate in a singing competition program by MBN as a representative of traditional music. “With my music, I am trying to touch the emotions that all Koreans unconsciously carry in their minds,” said Ha. Ha told the members of Hanyang to keep their passion and believe in what they are aiming for. “What you believe is what opens your way to the opportunities,” said Ha. “Even when you feel exhausted, don’t give up and do your best.” Oh Kyu-jin alex684@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-06 23

[Student]ERICA Orchestra "Angelus" with Sounds from the Heavens

"Let's explore ANGELUS, a group of ERICA students that love music more than any others."  Q. What kind of a group is ANGELUS? A. ANGELUS means The Sound of the Heavens. It is an inter-university amateur orchestra under the Office of Student Affairs, where students who love music are gathered. Place of birth, age, gender, and living environments of the students are different, but they are still becoming one in the name of music, creating one beautiful voice.  Q. If it's an orchestra, it seems that the major activities would be playing instruments. Is that correct? A. There are annual concerts held every March and September for outdoor activities. There are other small activities meant to build friendships among the students, such as a founding celebration and other small concerts. Moreover, the ANGELUS orchestra is closely connected with other universities. To help the concerts of other universities, we participate in others' concerts as guest members and also invite guest members from other schools as well. Other than that, we also participate actively in events such as support concerts for the Office of Student Affairs, the Ansan Flashmob Concert, tutoring the Haeyang Middle School Orchestra, and other events within the school.  Q. How is ANGELUS constructed? A. There is an executive branch that takes care of overall administration work. Orche-group takes care of orchestra activities, and acts an advisory group that seeks to help or take on the role of middle man for a better operation of the orchestra. The executive branch mainly deals with administrative work, concerts and events, accounting, and student management. Orche-group is composed of section leaders that aim to make the best ensembles by directing the ensembles, delivering music scores, and taking care of each member's part. The instruments can be changed according to the members, but generally, in the string section there are violins, violas, cellos, contrabasses, and in the woodwind section there are flutes, clarinets, oboes, trumpets, trombones, and horns. Q. Since it is a group playing instruments, do you need to have basic playing skills? A. More than the skills of playing the instruments, the desire to play the instruments is more vital. Some people even started reading musical notes for the first time in their lives after entering ANGELUS. But they were full of passion for learning how to play the instruments, and all members gave great help. In the end, we were able to create beautiful sounds together. Q. How do you prepare for concerts? A. Dividing the year into two parts, we select which songs to play at a meeting. Usually, we select 1 or 2 overtures and a concerto to play in the first half of the concert select a symphony for the second half, and choose an encore song for the end of the concert. Taking the last concert as an example, we prepared Beethoven's Coriolan Overture and Mendelssohn's Final's Cave for the first half, and Beethoven: Symphony No. 7 for the second half. For the encore song, we prepared James Bond 007 in an orchestra version. Once the songs are selected, we start the ensemble. It is usually done once a week, about two and a half hours to three hours, excluding two weeks during exam periods. Once vacation starts after the semester ends, we start focusing more on the ensemble. The director comes every week to lead the ensemble, and we increase the number of practices to twice a week. Once the semester starts again, we practice almost daily, or every other day, to prepare for the upcoming concert. We usually hold the concert within two or three weeks of the start of the semester. Q. When does ANGELUS recruit new members? A. We are not able to have active events due to COVID-19 for now, but we are always recruiting members. Usually, registration can be done by contacting the president or vice-president, or through the Facebook page. It is also okay to visit the orchestra room directly. Also, we open a recruitment booth every March and September, so please visit if you have any interest. Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Lee Won-young

2020-05 12 Important News

[Alumni]Choi Ye-gun, From a Keyboard Prodigy to a Shining Musician

If you have watched Immortal Songs: Singing the Legend, Yoo Hee-yeol's Sketchbook, or the popular Korean audition program K-pop Star, you may be familiar with the name Choi Ye-gun. This famous singer was one of the top 8 competitors of season 2 of K-pop Star and took first place in the singing competition Your name hosted by the popular music channel Yoo Hee-yeol's Sketchbook. Choi Ye-gun, an aspiring musician and a proud alumna of Hanyang University's Department of Applied Music ('19), shared her story of how she fell in love with music and succeeded as a popular indie musician. Choi Ye-gun (Department of Applied Music, '19) shared her story of how she fell in love with music and succeeded as a popular indie musician. Choi dreamt of becoming a musician from the age of five. As a little girl, she always had a keyboard next to her, a trait she carries till now. “There was always a piano in my room since I was little. My mother used to say that I got along with it since I could barely walk!” She remembers that even then, she was interested in expressing melodies through instrument, trying to express the tune she heard from her church. At 20, she applied to the Department of Applied Music at ERICA Campus for a professional musical education. “During my time at school, I was able to study music which transcended the boundaries of genre, from K-pop to jazz and classical music,” said Choi. Choi was one of the top 8 competitors of season 2 of K-pop Star. Along with her studies, Choi also endeavored to develop her own musical ideology and establish her own methodology in composing and arranging music. Her hard work earned her the image of a good storyteller, acknowledged by the media as a singer-songwriter, magnificent in delivering her own stories in songs. Choi considers her ability to deliver someone’s story, transcending the limits of a single genre, as one of her strongest suits. She said, “Since I always consider how a story could be told from a different perspective, I think many different people can relate even to the same song.” When asked to share her secret, Choi explained that she always focuses on how to best deliver a story. “First, I choose a character. Then I write the lyrics in his or her verbal tone. The last thing I do is combine it with a befitting melody. During the process, I begin to naturally arrange the song in the character’s mood and create the dynamics which enable a strong delivery of the story.” Choi also took first place in the singing competition Your name hosted by the popular music channel Yoo Hee-yeol's Sketchbook. Choi said other people’s stories become the cornerstone for many of her songs. “These days, I am especially inspired by the stories of young people.” Naturally, her songs explore stories on diverse topics. Self-reflection, social issues, and interpersonal relationships were all on the chart. “After I establish someone’s story in my mind, I design a character who can deliver that story well – reconstructing the story from another perspective,” explained Choi. Choi also tells some personal stories on her most recent album Even If It Gets Lost, It Can Flow Anyway, introducing two title songs, Lucid Dream and Scarecrow. “The first song, Lucid Dream, is a story of somebody who could not fall asleep and a world where dreams come true. To me, making this very album was exactly that,” said Choi. “Scarecrow is an outcry to the world that wants me to be, so to say, cool. To be recognized, one has to be cool and people want that too. But to that I say, ‘I have done enough!’” Choi jokingly added, “By the way, the chorus part is very addictive, so you better not listen to it before an important exam.” Choi's first original album Even If It Gets Lost, It Can Flow Anyway was released April 22, 2020, introducing two catcy title songs Lucid Dream and Scarecrow. “To me, your story becomes music, and that music becomes a medium which enables others to relate with your tale,” said Choi. “When I produce music, I consider myself as dust. Dust can only shine where there is light. To me, your story is the illumination. Your stories are never little or meaningless.” Lee Yoon-seo cipcd0909@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-04 08

[Student]"Hanyang's Love for Culture" at ERICA Campus

▲ The 16th Hanyang Culture Supporters Q. Please introduce Hanyang Culture Supporters to us. A. Hanyang Culture Supporters is an official organization affiliated with the Student Administration that plans, supervises, and hosts several cultural events in order to create ERICA campus’ very own specialized culture. We help the students to stay energized by hosting various events every Wednesday, a day of the week that many students can agree is like a "slump day" for them. Through these events, we help the students stay more energized so that they can devote themselves to their studies throughout the entire week. We are always working hard to make sure that the students of ERICA Campus are enjoying a happy campus life. Q. What kind of events have you hosted so far? A. For each festival season, we always host a variety of events for the students to enjoy. In 2018, we hosted an environmental campaign titled "We are Green Hanyang Culture" in order to create a culture of environmental awareness specifically for Hanyang University. For this campaign, we handed out free drinks to the students who brought their own empty bottles, and we also entertained an environmental mock test and handed out prizes to those who scored well. In 2019, we also hosted a "Subjective Travel Journal" event as the last event of the year. During this event, the students chose where they wanted to go and after filling out an Arrival Card, the students were able to experience what it would be like to travel the world through VR technology. ▲ A photo from the "We are Green Hanyang Culture" event Q. How can students participate in the events hosted by Hanyang Culture Supporters? A.The events are held once or twice a month, on Wednesdays from 1 to 3 pm in front of Democracy Square. This event only exists at the ERICA campus, and is a valuable time reserved and created by Hanyang Culture Love so that the students can participate in our events with ease. So, we hope that students will be able to participate and create their own precious university life memories by coming to Democracy Square on Wednesdays at 1 pm. Q. What kind of processes does the organization go through before hosting an event? A. The Organization of Hanyang Culture Love consists of the Management Team, the Planning Department, the Operations Department, and the External Cooperation Team. Before hosting an event, we have periodic meetings with the Student Administration so that we can prepare for our events that can be symbolized as something special for the Hanyang University students. We then have regular meetings one month before an event to decide on a concept and to thoroughly plan for it. We then create posters and prepare advertisements to publicize the event on social media, and we also conduct rehearsals all together a day before the event. We are always trying our best to make sure that we will conduct something that makes the students at ERICA campus happy. Q. When do you feel taking part in Hanyang Culture Supporters is rewarding? A. Among the students who have participated in our events, there have been many who have posted pictures of themselves or the prizes that they received on their personal social media accounts. When I saw how much the students have enjoyed our events, I was able to feel fulfilled and happy. Q. How can students apply to join Hanyang Culture Supporters? A. Hanyang Culture Supporters is a student body that is run by Sophomore students for an entire year. Our application period is open during the second half of the year for students who are becoming sophomores the following year, regardless of their admissions year number. If there are any students who would like to take part in Hanyang Culture Supporters from the year 2021, you can get to know us better through our various events in 2020 and join us as the 17th members later this year! Q. What should one be aware of when applying to Hanyang Culture Supporters? A. Hanyang Culture Supporters always welcomes students who have a sense of responsibility, are sincere, and honest. In order to host the events every month, we have regular meetings every week and each member of the organization must work on and finish their tasks with sincerity in order for our events to run smoothly. But even if you feel that you are not competent in those fields, as long as you are a student who loves Hanyang University and is willing to have an active school life, anyone can join Hanyang Culture Supporters. Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-04 07

[Student]The Practice of Love by ERICA Ambassador 'Love, Hanyang'

'Love, Hanyang,' the promotional ambassador group of Hanyang University ERICA has shown love to Hanyang. Let's take a look at the miracles they've created in the midst of a difficulty cuase by COVID-19 crisis. Q. We have invited 'Love, Hanyang,' who worked hard to collect donations to help overcome COVID-19. How did you start this donation event? A : Due to the sudden spread of COVID-19, we were disappointed that we couldn’t proceed with the activities that we had prepared. We thought about what we could do to help overcome COVID-19 and came up with the idea of starting a donation drive. We selected organizations fairly and carefully, hoping that the donations would be used in a timely manner, and asked various institutions to promote the drive to many students from Hanyang University ERICA. Also, for transparent financial management, the ambassadors did not lose their tension during the week-long fundraising period by organizing and disclosing the deposit details every day. We were proud that we could carry out the 'Love in Deed and Truth', which is part of the school’s philosophy, and it was an honor for Love, Hanyang to lead the event. In the beginning, it was a bit stressful to start fundraising as a school representative, but thanks to all the Hanyang family members that participated, it was better than expected. Q. What does the university ambassador Love, Hanyang do exactly? A : Love, Hanyang is the official ambassador of Hanyang University ERICA’s Admission Team, and works to promote our school both on- and off-campus. In this year, nine students are participating as 15th member of Love, Hanyang. Love, Hanyang is communicating with many middle and high school students through campus tours, HY-LIGHT (a high school student college tour program), frequent admission fairs at Coex, and local high school visitations to promote Hanyang University ERICA. Moreover, we carry out protocols during official school and student events to communication with our students. In addition, Love, Hanyang is a model for school promotional magazines, newsletters, and promotional videos as a representative body of the university. Q. Please tell us about the pride of Hanyang University ERICA that Love, Hanyang loves. A : Hanyang University ERICA, which is known as a university-industry cluster, operates IC-PBL, an independent and creative education model inside all divisions in our university. IC-PBL is a learner-centered class that builds self-directed problem-solving skills in conjunction with businesses. From this, students can solve problems that can occur on real business sites by themselves. Furthermore, we are actively supporting student startups. In order for all students interested in startups to experience them, we are operating startup lectures as basic mandatory classes and liberal arts classes which allow students to gain basic startup knowledge. As a result, Hanyang University ERICA has a strong startup establishment rate every year with high student participation, as it supports startup clubs with production costs, marketing, promotion costs, offices, and meeting rooms. Q. What skills are needed in Love, Hanyang? A : Love, Hanyang considers love for school an important factor as it is an ambassador group that represents Hanyang University ERICA students. It is helpful for promotional activities if one knows a lot about the university along with caring a lot about it. Also, there are a lot of situations where presentations or communications are needed in places with a lot of people or with middle and high school students, faculty, parents, and people from outside. So, we think a friendly attitude is also an important asset. Lastly, a strong sense of responsibility is required for the team to perform each of the tasks faithfully. Those of you who have passion and a sense of responsibility for Hanyang University should appeal to what you are confident in while filling out the application form and preparing for an interview. Q. Finally, is there anything you want to say to the freshmen class of '20? A : Dear freshmen class of '20, you’ve done a great job surviving the tough exam years and coming to Hanyang University ERICA. With COVID-19, we are concerned that you cannot fully enjoy life on-campus that you would have dreamed of. We, Love, Hanyang, also can’t wait to see you on the blooming campus after this chaotic time passes. You can all do anything you want and become anyone you want to be. Do not doubt your abilities, and we hope you build a variety of experiences and precious memories over the course of four years. Please show a lot of love and attention to Love, Hanyang, and we will be rooting for you to show everything you’ve dreamed of at Hanyang University ERICA! Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-02 28

[Faculty][HY's Excellence] Pioneering precision medicine using the largest cohort of SLE and RA combining clinical and genetic epidemiologic research

Professor Sang-Cheol Bae a Full Professor (1993~) and Distinguished Professor (2012~) of the Hanyang University; the former Director of the Hanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases (2005-2019); and Director of Hanyang University Institute for Rheumatology Research (2019~), Seoul, Korea. He is known to have an authority in the medical community who won the Wunsch Medical Award in 2018 and the Paiknam Great Scholar Award in 2020 which are the most prestigious awards. He has been acknowledged for his diagnosis and treatment of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus [SLE] and Rheumatoid Arthritis [RA] in addition to other various clinical and translational research. His illustrious career shows excellent leadership as a medical service provider. And he is taking on the roles of a full member of SLICC (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics) (1998~), a full member of National Academy of Medicine of Korea (2011~), the president of Korean Society of SLE Research (2016~), a full member of APLC (Asia Pacific Lupus Collaboration) (2016~), Vice president of Korean Academy of Medical Sciences (2018~), a full member of Korean Academy of Science and Technology (2018~) and the elected president of 15th International Congress on SLE (2023). Based on clinical and genetic epidemiologic research with his largest SLE and RA cohorts, he is currently preparing to develop new therapeutics and personalized treatment of SLE and RA according to the causes of the disease. In 2016, Professor Bae produced significant results related to lupus through research that was a joint effort with the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) of the U.S. with the involvement of a large number of national and international university hospitals. With Koreans mainly constituting the research subjects, the genetic variant of the immune genes of a total of 17,000 patients in East Asia and those of healthy people were analyzed with high density through Immunochip platform technology, coming up with the result of identifying 10 new genes that cause lupus and specifying functional genetic variants that directly result in causing the disease. Through the research, it was confirmed that many lupus genes become genetically modified to engage in various immune mechanisms due to genetic variants. They also discovered 56 therapeutics that affect the activity of the 10 genes which can be used in the customized treatment of lupus. These drugs have been applied to the “drug repositioning concept” which means an approach to accelerate the drug discovery process through the identification of a novel clinical use for an existing drug approved for a different indication. The large-scale SLE cohort research of Korea, China, and Japan organized by Professor Bae is still being conducted. “There are still too few research projects that focus on Asians as the subject of study. The current cohort study of Korea, China, and Japan is 13 times larger (about 220,000 people) than the previous study (about 17,000 people), and it is expected to show some notable results by the middle of this year.” He added that there is another joint international research project that he is a part of. “It is still too early to describe the research in detail, but we are planning to go beyond genetics and conduct thorough integrated analyses with epigenetics, transcriptomics, proteomics and more, hoping to perform precise assessment of patients’ prognosis, drug response, and reasons for worsening conditions.” Professor Bae is currently focusing on ensuring that SLE and RA treatment advances to the level of precise medical treatment. He explained that he is striving to realize a future medical service which can predict and prevent the occurrence of rheumatic diseases, along with targeted treatment of the disease which would be used for patients that show signs of improvement with the correct and proper amounts of medicines. As a medical person, Professor Bae chose a path that many doctors do not take “the path of a rheumatologist” in Korea about 30 years ago. Since committing to that path, he has pioneered in precision medicine through the cohort research in Korea, which was less common at that time, studying SLE and RA which are notorious for having unclear and various causes, finding out not only their causation but also targeting treatment methods and more. The faithful and diligent mind of one pioneer has shed light on the dark path of rheumatic diseases. 2019-present Director, Hanyang University Institute for Rheumatology Research, Seoul, Korea 2018-present Editorial Board, Annals of Rheumatic Diseases 2018-present Vice President, Korean Academy of Medical Sciences 2018-present Full member, Korean Academy of Science and Technology 2016-present Full member, APLC (Asia Pacific Lupus Collaboration) 2016-present President, Korean Society of SLE Research 2012-present Hanyang University Distinguished Professor, Seoul, Korea 2011-present Full member, National Academy of Medicine of Korea 2008-2015 Clinical Research Center for Rheumatoid Arthritis by Ministry of Health and Welfare, Korea (PI, Director) 2006-2007 Presidential Medical R&D advisory committee member 2005-2019 Director, Hanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Seoul, Korea 1998-present Full member, SLICC (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics) 1997-1998 Ad hoc Committee on Neuropsychiatric SLE nomenclature (co-chair) 1996-1998 Research Fellow and Instructor, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA 1993-present Professor in Internal Medicine, Rheumatology, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea 1996-1998 MPH, School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA 1985-1993 PhD (Medicine), Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea 1978-1984 MD, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea Professor Sang-Cheol Bae acquired his MD in 1984, and subsequently a PhD in 1993, from the Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea. From 1996 to 1998, he worked as a rheumatology research fellow and instructor at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. In 1998, he also obtained a Master of Public Health degree from the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA. Throughout his illustrious career, he has been honoured with numerous academic awards, including the 2008 Distinguished Clinical Investigator Award by the Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology, 2010 Hanmi Proud Doctor Award by the Korean Medical Association, 2011 Korean Rheumatology Academic Award by the Korean College of Rheumatology, 2012 Hanyang University Distinguished Scholar Professor award, 2016 Minister of Health & Welfare Award, 2017 National R&D Excellence Award by Minister of Science and ICT, 2018 Wunsch Medical Award by the Korean Academy of Medical Sciences, and 2019 Paiknam Distinguished Scholar Professor award by Hanyang University. - Systemic Lupus Erythematosus [SLE] and Rheumatoid Arthritis [RA] - Clinical Epidemiology (including clinimetrics, clinical trials and innovative treatment development, clinical and pharmaco-economics, and outcomes research) - Genetic Epidemiology including drug discovery and repurposing - Precision Medicine Prof Bae’s research has the overall theme of understanding clinical, environmental & genetic factors associated with SLE and RA and their individual prognosis and drug response prediction for the precision medicine. For this purpose, as one of the most prominent clinician and researchers in Asia in this field, he has established largest Korean SLE & RA cohorts, solved clinically important questions, and identified clinical predictors and dozens of common genetic variants and epidemiologic factors conferring risk of the diseases using the advanced methodology like GWAS, NGS, immunochip, and HLA imputation for multiple ancestral populations. With these studies, he has also discovered novel biologic insights and therapeutic targets which implicate a potential guiding role of human SLE/RA genetics data in drug discovery and repurposing. In addition, he has already started to go beyond genetics and conduct thorough integrated analyses with epigenetics, transcriptomics, proteomics and more. He has successfully administered and participated in many multinational and multicenter projects as a principal investigator and co-investigator and he is always well aware of the factors needed for a successful research project which he will carry out. He has published ~700 articles on these topics in national and international peer-reviewed journals including, New England Journal of Medicine, Nature, Nature Genetics, Nature communications, American Journal of Human Genetics, PLoS genetics, Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, Arthritis and Rheumatology, Human Molecular Genetics, and Rheumatology, to name a few. Selected articles are as follows. “Trial Investigators. Trial of Anifrolumab in Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus”, N Engl J Med., 2020 Find more “Deletion at 2q14.3 is associated with worse response to TNF-α blockers in patients with rheumatoid arthritis”, Arthritis Res Ther, 2019 Find more “Amino acid signatures of HLA Class-I and II molecules are strongly associated with SLE susceptibility and autoantibody production in Eastern Asians”, PLoS Genet, 2019 Find more “Biological function integrated prediction of severe radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: a nested case control study”, Arthritis Res Ther, 2017 Find more “Influence of HLA-DRB1 Susceptibility alleles on the clinical subphenotypes of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Koreans”, Arthritis Rheumatol, 2016 Find more “Identification of a systemic lupus erythematosus risk locus spanning ATG16L2, FCHSD2, and P2RY2 in Koreans”, Arthritis Rheumatol, 2016 Find more “High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry”, Nat Genet, 2016 Find more “Interactions between amino-acid-defined MHC class II variants and smoking for seropositive rheumatoid arthritis“, Arthritis Rheumatol, 2015 Find more “High-density genotyping of immune loci in Koreans and Europeans identifies eight new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci”, Ann Rheum Dis., 2015 Find more “Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis contributes to biology and drug discovery”, Nature, 2014 Find more “The HLADRβ1 amino acid positions 11-13-26 explain the majority of SLE-MHC associations”, Nat Commun, 2014 Find more “Smoking, the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope and ACPA fine-specificity in Koreans with rheumatoid arthritis: evidence for more than one pathogenic pathway linking smoking to disease”, Ann Rheum Dis, 2014 Find more “Variation in the ICAM1-ICAM4-ICAM5 locus is associated with systemic lupus erythematosus susceptibility in multiple ancestries”, Ann Rheum Dis, 2012 Find more “Smoking increases rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility in individuals carrying the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope, regardless of rheumatoid factor or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody status”, Arthritis Rheum, 2010 Find more “Increased Susceptibility to Rheumatoid Arthritis in Koreans Heterozygous for HLA-DRB1*0405 and *0901” Arthritis Rheum, 2004 Find more Go! Hanyang WIKI : http://wiki.hanyang.ac.kr/Sang-Cheol_Bae

2020-02 28

[Faculty][HY's Excellence] A Pioneer in the Field of Semiconductor Wet Cleaning and CMP, Leading Global Technology in the Korean Semiconductor Industry

Hydrofluoric acid, which was included in Japan’s trade regulation in 2019, is a well-known semiconductor-cleaning solution. Who is the leading researcher that studies ultra-high purity and high-performance semiconductor wet cleaning solutions? This individual is Professor Jin-Goo Park from the Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering at Hanyang University. Professor Park started his career by working at Texas Instruments, a US semiconductor company, as a wet cleaning and surface chemistry researcher after obtaining his Ph. D. from the University of Arizona. He joined Hanyang University in 1994, and he has been conducting research in the field of wafer wet cleaning and surface modification. Since CMP as a polishing process began to be applied to semiconductors at the end of the 1990s, Professor Park also had started to conduct research on CMP since the background foundations of cleaning and CMP are the same. Semiconductor cleaning and CMP studies are interdisciplinary company-centered industrial technologies. As this field of study began only recently, and the demands for it are specific, it is limited to only the semiconductor industries, making it a unique discipline that is difficult to study if one does not know the market demand from companies. Professor Park became a leader after founding facilities and equipment for semiconductor cleaning and CMP studies. Hanyang University is evaluated as the only university that has been studying semiconductor cleaning for more than 30years, thanks to his research capability. As the transistor feature size of semiconductors has decreased to less than 10 nm, and the materials and structures of the transistor have changed dramatically, the importance of cleaning and CMP technologies has become unimaginably important. His research on EUV cleaning is also ongoing as it has become an important technology recentl. The result of its importance is in large part due to Professor Park’s hard work, securing research facilities, and the supply of manpower that made Hanyang University stand at the center of this research. More than 70% of the research projects and fundings from Professor Park’s research lab are from industries including Samsung and SKhynix. Among them, approximately 30% of the project is from oversea major semconudctor industries. Understanding the needs of companies and producing research results in a given time frame are the lab’s strengths. Furthermore, it now provides a student internship program after making a strategic relationship with a Japanese CMP tool company. His recent paper and patent work on cleaning technology after CMP process gained a significant amount of interest from domestic and global companies. Many companies are requesting a lot of continuous industry-university cooperation with deep interest in the research content from Professor Park’s lab based on published results.. Technology transfers of his research, patents, and the industrial impact of his papers are expected to increase continuously. Professor Park created the first industry oriented research conference for the semiconductor industry. This was made possible because of his pioneering spirit and leadership in the domestic CMP and cleaning fields. He created the Korea CMPUGM with researchers from major semiconductor companies 20 years ago and turned it into the world’s best professional organization in the field of CMP. In addition, creating the ICPT (International Conference on Planarization/CMP Technology) and developing it into a best-known and only international conference in CMP field is another achievement obtained by Professor Park. Semiconductor cleaning began in the mid-1980s when the technological foundation was weak. There were few difficulties in cleaning technologies in the early phases when contaminants were in micron size. However, the importance of cleaning was emphasized when it became important to removee particles under 100nm, and its importance is being highlighted again due to the demand for technology that can clean particles under 10nm. Cleaning technology comes as a last technolgy in semiconductor process development and directly related to the device yield which affects the profit of semiconductor companies in a significant way. He founded Industry Collaboration Center for Cleaning Technology(ICC-CT) at Hanyang University to educate process engineers and reserachers from industry and conduct research, and consultations. Professor Park is leading the technology independence project of the Hanyang University Technology Independence Team against Japan’s trade regulation by presiding over the Industry-University Cooperation Committee. Professor Park is also conducting a global talent cultivation project between Korea and Belgium. Through an MOU with IMEC, the best research institute in the semiconductor field, and KU Leuven, a prestigious university, they will send both master’s and doctoral level students. Students sent to IMEC will work at the world’s best research institute, and its educational impact is impossible to be quantified in monetary terms. The technological difficulties in semiconductor cleaning and CMP are increasing and expanding. Optimum research results can only be obtained when joint research is conducted with professionals from different fields, as it needs an interdisciplinary understanding and interpretation. Professor Park is open to anyone to contact him whenever they need his help. He has been trying to define the very definition of personal happiness since entering his 50s. He wishes to be a researcher who is helpful to the world while also trying to live a happy life, for only through true happiness can an individual feel any sense of achievement in their research and educational endeavors. 2015 ~ present Member, The National Academy of Engineering of Korea (NAEK) 2017 ~ present Director, Environmentally Benign Surface Cleaning ICC 2012 ~ 2014 Vice Dean of Graduate School 2012 ~ 2019 President, Society of International Planrarization/CMP Technology 2009 ~ 2012 Visiting Research Professor, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 2006 ~ present Managing Director and Board Member of Korea Cleaning UGM 2004 ~ 2006 and 2011 ~ 2015 President of Korea CMPUGM 2003 ~ present Program Committee Member, SEMI Korea STS 2002 ~ 2003 Visiting Scholar, Department of Mechanical Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston,USA 1992 ~ 1994 Member Technical Staff, Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX, USA - Wet Cleaning Processes/Chemicals in Semiconductor and Electronic Materials Fabrication - Chemical Mechanical Planrization, Post CMP Cleaning - Mask and EUV Cleaning - Wettability of Surfaces - Particle/Metallic Adhesion and Removal “Study on possible root causes of contamination from an incoming PVA brush during post-CMP cleaning”, Polymer Testing, 2019 Find more “Post-CMP Cleaning of InGaAs Surface for the Removal of Nanoparticle Contaminants for Sub-10nm Device Applications”, ECS J. Solid State Sci. Technol., 2019 Find more “Removal of EUV exposed hydrocarbon from Ru capping layer of EUV mask using the mixture of alkaline solutions and organic solvents”, Colloids and Surfaces A, 2018 Find more “Investigation of cu-BTA complex formation during Cu chemical mechanical planarization process”, Applied Surface Science, 2016 Find more “Fabrication of hydrophobic/hydrophilic switchable aluminum surfaceusing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)”, Progress in Organic Coatings, 2016 Find more Develoments in surface contamination and cleaning, Volume 9: Methods for Surface Cleaning (2017) ISBN: 978-0-3234-3157-6, Chapter 5. Contamination Removal From UV and EUV Photomasks, 2017 Find more Handbook of Silicon Wafer Cleaning Technolgy, 3rd Ed., ISBN: 978-0-323-51084-4, Chapter 3. Particle Deposition and Adhesion and Chapter 10. Metal Surface Chemical Composition and Morphology, 2018 Find more Guest Editor, Focus Issue on Chemical Mechanical Planarization for Sub-10 nm Technologies, ECS Journal of Solid State Science and Technology, 2019 Find more Ebara (Japan), Post CMP Cleaning Samsung Electronics (Korea), Backside particles contamination BASF-Chemetall (USA), Ceria particle removal SKhynix (Korea), IPA impurity control EUV mask cleansing solution and method of fabrication of the same Find more Cleaning method for PVA brush and that apparatus thereof Find more Go! Hanyang WIKI : http://wiki.hanyang.ac.kr/Jin-Goo_Park

2020-02 28

[Faculty][HY's Excellence] A Member of the Stockholm Convention on the POPs Review Committee, Protecting the Environment From Toxic Chemicals Delivered to the Next Generation

Hyo-Bang Moon, a professor in the Department of Marine Science and Convergence Engineering at Hanyang University, visited the Antartic after visiting the Arctic with the support of the Korea Polar Research Institute under the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries. Why is he studying the polar environment when he needs to analyze harmful pollutants? The detection of contaminants in the polar region where human activity is limited indicates the possibility of long-range transport of pollutants which have traveled through the atmosphere and oceanic currents, suggesting the need for global regulation. Because these toxic substances can also be accumulated in wildlife and humans, demonstrating various toxicological effects, scientific management of these substances is essential. Starting from 2020, Professor Moon will discover new toxic substances from the poles and report them to the Stockholm Convention. The Stockholm Convention is one of the three international chemical conventions, which regulates the POPs (Persistent Organic Pollutants) that travel over long distances throughout the globe. POPs are toxic substances that accumulate in wildlife, disrupt the immune system, and damage the central nervous system of an organism. As a representative of the world, Professor Moon has taken the important responsibility of reporting and regulating the discovery of candidates (toxic substances) to the Stockholm Convention for the duration of 4 years. Professor Moon has appeared on the SBS Environment’s In-Depth-Documentary over 10 years, such as The Poisonous Family and Body Burden. The documentary demonstrates to people how endocrine-disrupting chemicals invade the lives of wildlife and humans. He creates a report informing their discoveries of toxic substances and describe them scientifically so that they can be reflected in the national policy. The field that Professor Moon is studying, Marine Science and Convergence Engineering, is a converged study of marine science and coastal engineering. Marine Science and Convergence Engineering deals with the topic of development and conservation. 70 percent of the world's population lives along the coast and has been using and developing the ocean throughout history. More than 20% of the Korean population gains essential and nutritional proteins from marine products, yet at the same time, the sea is being contaminated as a result of human activities that are not only toxic to marine habitats but also contaminate marine products which are consumed by humans and lead to diseases. Therefore, research is being conducted on conservation technologies that can preserve a healthy marine ecosystem as well as sustainable technologies that allow the industries to manage toxic substances in advance so that humans can safely consume marine products. Environmental issues that arise in our oceans require an integrated field of study that is based on physics, chemistry, biology, and geology because issues related to the environment cannot be solved simply through only one field of study. For instance, in order to solve the problem of radiation in the sea, the scope of the problem must first be measured by the marine chemistry sector, then the extent of the transport can then be calculated by the marine physics sector. Next, its effects on living organisms can be studied by the marine biology sector, and, lastly, the marine geology sector can then study where the radiation has accumulated in the sea. As these several academic disciplines coalesce, integrating various fields of scientific study is imperative in solving environmental issues related to marine ecosystems. While studying Atmospheric Science, Professor Moon discovered the issue of dioxin diffusion. He also studied coastal oceanography at the National Institute of Fisheries Science, becoming an expert in the field of oceanography in his late 20s. Professor Moon is now proposing the management of chemicals based on environmental fate of pollutants and its entire process into the human body while studying Environmental Analytical Chemistry and Environmental Toxicology at Hanyang University. In addition, he has many achievements in various fields of research. For example, he proposed a new standard for pollutants that cause harm when they are discharged from wastewater treatment plants, which was accepted by the Ministry of Environment, resulting in local governments upgrading their sewage treatment sites. Professor Moon also conducted research on the house dust problem, which resulted in the government controlling carcinogens included in plastic additives and in receipts which have the potential of causing harm even within our individual households. In conducting these important studies and reports, he used the term 'Whack-A-Mole Game.' When the use of bisphenol A (BPA) was restricted by the government, the industries then began to substitute with other analogues, such as BPS, BPF, BPB, and so forth. Due to this reason, Professor Moon is also promoting a movement to change the restriction paradigm by regulating an entire chemical group (as family), not just a single toxic substance. As an environmental toxicologist, Professor Moon referenced a serious incident in the use of disinfectants in humidifiers that had occurred a few years back. This incident was, in fact, a disaster in which chemicals were developed to kill microbes, and that these chemicals were allowed by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy for use in a liquid form, but which resulted after use in the gas phase, which resulted in paralyzing the function of the lungs in the human body. This incident was a tragedy caused by the use of licensed chemicals that took a different form from their intended use. As a result of this incident, a paradigm occurred in South Korea, leading to stricter chemical registration assessment laws that restricted all use of chemicals that have not acquired safety data. By citing this incident, Professor Moon is striving to establish a system that requires companies to conduct lectures that allow suitable understanding of the lifecycle of toxic substances so that chemical producing companies can manufacture products with more sensitivity to the toxic nature of certain materials while also giving consumers the choice of selecting products with the proper safety information provided. Professor Moon was also appointed as the associate editor of a renowned international academic journal, Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety for five years. He is so highly recognized for his authority as a researcher who protects the environment that he has become the face of a global-leading journal. He has written more than 200 papers so far and handles 1,000 international papers as the associate editor within a single year. Students who have been taught by Professor Moon have also been praised for their ability to be able to understand the bigger picture of the chemical management process in leading companies and laboratories. The light in Professor Moon’s office stays on until late every night, due to the time that needs to be invested in the endless education, research, and reviews of international papers. 2020~2024: Review Committee, Stockholm Convention, UNEP 2018~ present: Executive Committee Member, Polar Environment and Ecosystem, Chinese Society for Environmental Science, Harbin Institute of Technology, China 2015~present, Associate Editor, Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, Elsevier 2015~ present, Editorial Board, Chemosphere(SCI), Emerging Contaminants, Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, Data in Brief 2010~Present, Professor of Hanyang University Department of Marine Science and Convergence Engineering 2005~2006, Visiting Scientist, U.S. Health Research, Inc. / State University of New York 2003, Doctor of Science, Pukyung National University Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences 2002~2014, National Expert, NOWPAP, YSLME, PICES 1999~2010, Senior Researcher, Environment Research Department of National Institute of Fisheries Science 1. Environmental Pollution of POPs and EDCs - Environmental monitoring of POPs and EDCs - Environmental fate of emerging contaminants - Monitoring of emerging contaminants in Arctic and Antarctic environments 2. Ecological risk assessment (ERA) study: Wildlife Ecotoxicology - Biomonitoring of POPs and EDCs in wildlife (e.g., marine mammals & birds) - Biomagnification of POPs and EDCs in food-web ecosystem - Understanding the bioaccumulation process of emerging contaminants 3. Human risk assessment (HRA) study: Birth Cohort - Biomonitoring of POPs and EDCs in human fluids (e.g., urine & serum) - Exposure assessment of emerging contaminants via multiple exposure pathways - Development of new biomonitoring tool for human-derived matrices 4. Study on analytical method of emerging contaminants - Development of new analytical method of emerging contaminants - Non-target screening analysis (NTSA) using GC/Q-TOF - Prioritization of emerging contaminants in environment and humans “Accumulation and time trends (2003-2015) of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in blubber of finless porpoises (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis) from Korean coastal waters”, Journal of Hazardous Materials, 2020 Find more “Organophosphate esters in indoor dust from 12 countries: Concentrations, composition profiles, and human exposure”, Environment International, 2019 Find more “Optimization of suspect and non-target analytical methods using GC/TOF for prioritization of emerging contaminants in the Arctic environment”, Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 2019 Find more “Tissue-specific accumulation and body burden of parabens and their metabolites in small cetaceans”, Environmental Science & Technology, 2019 Find more “Prenatal exposure to persistent organic pollutants and methylation of LINE-1 and imprinted genes in placenta: a CHECK cohort study”, Environment International, 2018 Find more “An optimized method for the analysis of cyclic and linear siloxanes and their distribution in surface and core sediments from industrialized bays of Korea”, Environmental Pollution, 2018 Find more “Historical trends of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in dated sediments from semi-enclosed bays of Korea”, Marine Pollution Bulletin, 2018 Find more “Species-specific accumulation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and other emerging flame retardants in several species of birds from Korea”, Environmental Pollution, 2016 Find more “Occurrence and exposure assessment of organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) through the consumption of drinking water in Korea”, Water Research, 2016 Find more “Occurrence and prenatal exposure to persistent organic pollutants using meconium in Korea: Feasibility of meconium as a non-invasive human matrix”, Environmental Research, 2016 Find more “Synthetic musk compounds and benzotriazole ultraviolet stabilizers in breast milk: Occurrence, time-course variation and infant health risk”, Environmental Research, 2015 Find more Go! Hanyang WIKI : http://wiki.hanyang.ac.kr/Hyo-Bang_Moon