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2018-12 24

[Faculty]Thoughts on Korean English Education

Although English is not an official language in Korea, it is still considered a mandatory part of education from primary to college. Especially because English exam scores have become a basic requirement for jobs or any other program applications today, gaining competency in the language is now a competition for Korean students from an early age. Lee Kwang-hee, a professor in the Department of English Language and Literature and a current member of the board of directors at Korea Munhwasa (한국문화사), a renowned publishing company in Korea, has shared his life story and thoughts on this phenomenon. Lee Kwang-hee (Department of English Language and Literature) is sharing his life story and thoughts during the interview in his office at Korea Munhwasa (한국문화사). Lee’s deep affection for English began in his college years at Hanyang. With his profound love for the school, Lee completed all his bachelor's, master's, and doctor's degrees at Hanyang University, all in the department of English Language and Literature. According to Lee, his choice of department was not due to his passion but because his highest score was in English, which made him think he had a talent in it. However, life as a student in this department completely changed his path. “You don’t learn how to speak better English in this department. Rather, you learn about the literature and human language, which is part of our life and instinct. In other words, you study about life and human nature, while using English instead of Korean,” said Lee. Despite his skills and competency, Lee had not always planned on becoming a professor from the start. According to Lee, his life as an English department student was always unclear, especially as the Korean economy was at its lowest point at that time due to IMF. Luckily, Lee found some recruitment advertisements for English academies and decided to apply to become an English teacher. However, he had to face constant rejections as he was quite young, and HYU was renowned more for its technology departments than language departments. “In the end, my desperation got me through. I was finally teaching in one of the academies, but because I wasn’t getting enough students or teaching bigger classes, I was barely surviving with the minimum wage,” said Lee. Lee also has over 15 books published that are loved and used by students throughout the country. Fortunately for Lee, he was able to quickly gain his popularity and recognition as an English teacher after substituting for one of the bigger classes. With this turn of events, he quickly became one of the high-earning, popular teachers that taught classes everyday. There were endless calls for him, and at one point, he thought he was living the best life. However, years had passed, and Lee was constantly feeling a void that could not be filled. One day during a class, he realized that he had become a simple technician and a parrot that teaches students on how to solve questions, rather than why they work that way. With a recommendation from his professor, Lee went on to obtain his master's degree at HYU. “I remember why I fell in love with learning English. Learning a language is like developing a whole new world in you. A language has its own system and mechanisms like science, and one should be able to utilize it with intuition. I realized that that is what English education in Korea has been lacking. When I'm teaching, I mostly see students that are simply trained to speak English. They don’t speak the language because they truly understand it. Students treat it like it’s some sort of simple technical equation because that’s what they’ve been trained to do their whole lives, and this applies to all languages being taught in Korea.” "I hope more talented intellectuals or even students with creative ideas for bettering the Brown Study would feel free to contact me. It's an open, digitalized platform for everyone." To the current situation, Lee added that the intellectuals are also at fault. “I think that this kind of problem exists because the studies and realizations that us intellectuals have remain in our own league. There needs to be better communication among the language intellectuals as educators and students." Lee commented that it would be the best if those with a language degree from universities become teachers at English academies and pass on what they have learned in universities to their students. With this in mind, Lee has created an online study platform called the Brown Study in hopes of creating an open, digitalized platform with all kinds of study materials in the language and humanities field that anyone can access. This way, even professors who have retired or any other intellectuals can leave their work online and teach the students who wish to truly learn more than just the simple technicalities. “I hope this can become a communication outlet for both students and intellectuals. I believe that as long as you’re always intellectually curious and keep an open mind, you will always succeed,” said Lee. Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-12 17

[Student]When a Lion Goes to School

The student-made YouTube channel that represents Hanyang University, “When a Lion Goes to School," now has over 14,000 subscribers. Uploading video content related to school life in Hanyang University, Choi E-re (Department of Industrial Engineering, 2nd year), who often undertakes the role of an emcee in the video making process, spoke about the process of starting a Youtube channel that Hanyang University students can relate to, and the story of owning and growing a channel led by students themselves. The YouTube channel, "When a Lion Goes to School" currently has more than 14,000 subscribers and 29 videos. (Photo courtesy of "When a Lion Goes to School") Choi E-re (Department of Industrial Engineering, 2nd year) talked about the YouTube channel that he and his crew run, known as, “When a lion goes to school" on December 14th, 2018. The beginning It was this March that things first started with the “When a Lion Goes to School” channel on Youtube when three students from the Department of Industrial Engineering came up with the idea. Unquestionably, editing is a crucial part of making video production, so they even went on to contact the dean of the Department of Media Communication to gather editors for their crew. For the first video, which is titled, “We asked Hanyang University engineering students," was uploaded on April 20th. They introduced the stereotypes that people usually have of students from the Department of Engineering. When they were first starting out in YouTube, one of the major concerns was regarding whether to target Hanyang University students or college students in general. They ended up targeting Hanyang University because a channel dedicated to introducing academic information to the life styles of Hanyang University students did not exist. There are a total of eight members who work as a team for “When a Lion Goes to School.” Rather than assigning a specific role to each members, they strive to all work together. Working together through the whole process has both pros and cons, according to Choi. It can be hard to gather ideas effectively since there are so many people participating, but it does give them the feeling of accomplishment by working as a team and watching the channel grow together. Process of making a video Making and uploading a video takes two weeks. The members have to hold a meeting on Sundays to share their ideas on new content, and after that, they decide on a topic and begin writing a questionnaire for the interviewees. “When a Lion Goes to School” team recruits guests through social media, they first begin by uploading a form asking for volunteers that match with the theme of the video for that week. They then contact the guests, find the right schedule, and ready themselves to film by completing the questionnaire with 9 to 10 questions and finalize a written script that helps emcee the whole process. They edit the video using photoshop, captions, background music, and special effects. Then the video is uploaded that weekend. The filming of the video in a studio (Photo courtesy of "When a Lion Goes to School") As one of the more memorable times since starting this channel, in one of the early videos titled, “Hanyang University Culture Sock!,” the crew had to look for exchange students from foreign countries but did not know how. They started to look in Hanyang Plaza, a global lounge of Sarang-bang, the lobby of the International Building, the amphitheater, and so on. Exchange students who joined the interview later thanked the crew for making a memorable experience for them in Korea. For a future video, the crew hopes to interview graduate students who have successfully found their position in society. "We want to loosen up the seriousness that the topic of employment brings and make a helpful mentor video for undergraduates,” said Choi. Future goals “When a lion goes to school” team would first like to grow into a channel that all students in Hanyang University are aware of. They would then like to widen their target viewers and share the stories of college students in general. “One common wish that all crew members share is that we hope the channel will continue on even after the starters of this channel graduate and leave. That is our strongest wish.” Said Choi Ee-rae. Warm hearted comments that students from Hanyang University wrote on the initial videos are still remembered by the crew members. One comment said that these videos could be the competitive edge for our school. “Thank you for giving us great support. I don’t wish for much but I hope you keep watching our videos with open hearts.” The crew members of "When a Lion Goes to School" (Photo courtesy of Choi) Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-12 10

[Alumni]Passing the 41st Actuaries Examination

The new International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS17) will be implemented for insurance companies by 2022, which will change the debt evaluation standard from a prime cost to a market price. This means more actuaries are in need in order to prevent an increase in debt and reduction in capital for insurance companies. Under such conditions, a banner that congratulated those who passed the 41st actuaries examination at the ERICA campus put a smile on many. Two students among the three listed are among the first accepted from the Department of Actuarial Science. (From left) Kim Bo-geun (Department of Actuarial Science, 4th hear), Seo Ye-ji (Department of Actuarial Science, '17), and Joo Hyung-min (Master's Degree in Insurance and Finance) The first-round exam scores out of a 100, and all subjects except English must be above 40 points with the average being above 60 in order to pass. Those who passed the first round exam are qualified to take the second round exam within the next 5 years, including the year that they passed the first exam. All 5 subjects must achieve a score of 60 or higher in order to pass the final exam. The first-round exam consists of 5 subjects: The first subject includes insurance contract law, insurance business acts, and employee retirement benefit security act. The rest are insurance mathematics, principles of economics, accounting principles, and English, which is a subject that can be replaced by official English test scores. In the first-round exam, Kim Bo-geun and Seo Ye-ji both found accounting difficult because they usually study the subject by writing out descriptive answers to problems, whereas the exam had multiple choice questions. They repeatedly practiced solving various questions and tried to memorize the format. The subjects covered in the second-round exam are actuarial risk management, actuarial mathematics, pension science, actuarial model theory, and lastly, financial management and financial engineering. The interviewees all agreed that financial management and financial engineering was the toughest part to study. “You only need a 100 in order to pass the exam, but the examination covers 300,” said Kim Bo-geun. Seo Ye-ji (Department of Actuarial Science, ’17) and Joo Hyung-min (Master's Degree in Insurance and Finance) prepared for the exam while working at an insurance company, and Kim Bo-geun (Department of Actuarial Science, 4th year) is currently attending the last semester before his early graduation and has already found a position at an insurance company. Seo and Kim began to learn more about what an actuary does when they were sophomores in college, and the department of Actuarial Science actively supported the career paths of students in becoming actuaries. The interviewees emphasized that becoming an actuary gives you pride that you have a specialized job. As for their struggles for the exam, Kim said he did not go through a slump, thanks to the timely trips that he took once in a while, and an hour of daily exercise that helped him stay healthy inside and out. Seo prevented any slumps by trying not to be shaken by her emotions and having enough sleep. Joo agreed that he was not stressed much during the exam preparation period. He said that he had fun studying for the Society of Actuaries (SOA), which is an American actuaries exam because it felt as if he was studying English. “The passing of the SOA exam was a big motivation for me to do better in the Korean actuaries exam.” The SOA exams cover a lot of content that the Korean exam is tested on. All three of them passed the SOA exam as well. Although there are unexpected fluctuations in actuaries exams each year, the exam is gradually becoming easier. A total of 124 people passed the exam this year, which is 62 more people than last year. Studying for the exam is important, but business practice and work experience is what gives you an advantage when looking for a job, said Seo Ye-ji. “I was surprised at first by the gap between the real work and the things I studied. Company work is much more complicated than just finding an answer in a book. I recommend you to look for work experience whether it is part time work or working as an intern at a company. You need to have an idea of how things work around here.” Seo Ye-ji went on to say that she wants to thank the school and the professors for making a department that majors in actuarial science and for building an atmosphere where students could effectively chase a dream of becoming an actuary. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-12 04

[Alumni]Onestar on a Steady Rise

BTS, TWICE, Super Junior – these are only a few of the K-pop idol groups that enjoy global attention. Before influencers became a thing, becoming an idol was one of the top dreams of young Korean teenagers. However, as many have tried, it is extremely hard to pass through cut throat competitions, let alone hit the charts with a song loved and supported by the public. Lim Han-byul (Department of Information Sociology, ERICA campus, '15) was one of the exceptional cases that proved that years of hard work and a sprinkle of talent can get you to places. Ever since Lim was young, he had a strong passion for singing. Naturally, he wanted to become a singer and was officially able to become a trainee at the age of 19. Luckily for Lim, he was able to make his debut in just a year as the main vocal in an idol group called “Monday Kiz.” “My trainee period wasn’t that long as it only took me a year to debut. I don’t think I was that good, but I’m guessing they saw some potential in me. The group also needed a main vocalist, so I was lucky. Of course, life as a trainee and a student wasn’t easy. I had to take many breaks from school because the training itself was strenuous." “I've worked so hard to earn my nickname as a 'vocal-textbook,' and I will always strive to do so.” Lim Han-byul (Department of Information Sociology, ERICA campus, '15) (Photo courtesy by Most Contents) After five years of his life as an idol, Lim made the decision to stand out as a solo artist. On his first few attempts during practice, he realized how difficult it was to finish one song. “After years of on-stage experience, I never thought finishing one song by myself would be a problem. It hit me hard that I was basically formulated into singing as a group member, not a solo artist. It took me a year or two just practicing until I finally got on track. That’s also when I started my YouTube channel,” said Lim. Lim's cover on M.C THE MAX - No Matter Where (Video courtesy of Lim's YouTube channel) Lim is not only known as an ex-member of Monday Kiz, but also as a YouTuber with over 157 thousand subscribers. “I think it was around 2015 when I opened my channel. Back then, YouTube hadn't gained its popularity yet, and there weren’t that many covers on it either. I wasn’t looking for fame. I was simply looking for a platform where I could share my progress with my fans, and YouTube seemed like a great opportunity,” said Lim. As an interesting fact, 97 percent of Lim’s viewers are known to be male. To this fact, Lim commented, “I think it’s because I mostly sang pieces that guys would like. I don’t think I’m the best singer out there so they see how hard I try and feel that vicarious satisfaction. Some also practice with me.” “Multiple failures actually made me stronger. I was able to make many valuable artist friends and focus on studying music." (Photo courtesy of Lim) Lim is also an acknowledged and steady-growing singer-songwriter as well as a vocal guide. He was known for having participated in numerous songs of V.O.S., JYJ, Sunnyhill, Super Junior, NCT Dream and many more. “I didn’t have anything to lose. After Monday Kidz disbanded, I started from the very bottom again and worked as a trainer and a vocal guide. Right now, I am working with Mono Tree, a global music production and publishing company also known for working with a lot of SM artists. My new digital single, “The Way to Say Goodbye” is also with that company,” said Lim. “I'm trying to find the right balance as a singer and a songwriter. My experience as an artist in such broad fields has taught me how to look at the bigger scheme of things over the years and to think from a staff member's perspective." “The Way to Say Goodbye” is a song that depicts the story of a person on his way to end his relationship. As it is Lim’s first digital single, it took a special place in his heart. According to Lim, since he is not a genius, he gets his inspiration after hours of focusing, contemplating, and editing. His new single was also a product of many weeks of listening to numerous “good” music on top of a rough sketch that fairly reflects his turbulent twenties. Lim plans on releasing his next single album early next year. Despite the continuous build-up of success as a solo artist, Lim was astonishingly humble. Throughout the interview, he did not stop mentioning how much he needed to improve. When asked if such manner of speech could indirectly bring negative influence on his self-respect, Lim chuckled and said, “I am the type of person to easily feel proud and maybe even a bit conceited. If you really think about it, I had years of experience as an idol, as a vocal trainer, a guide, and a singer-songwriter. But this is also because I had failed as an idol which left me in a place to keep pushing myself. In my case, there’s only a fine line between failure and success. The moment I think I’m actually doing great, I start slacking off and be well on my way to failure again.” "Good music is whatever sounds good to you." (Photo courtesy by Lim) “We all have different values, so I don’t really believe in giving advice. However, there is one thing I do want to say and that’s to get your priorities straight, and act upon it accordingly. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes because opportunities do come and when they do, make sure to take it.” The Way to Say Goodbye - Onestar / Lim Han-byul (Video courtesy by Lim's YouTube channel) Hee Jae - Lim Han-byul Cover (Video courtesy by Lim's YouTube channel) Mono Tree's Facebook Page Most Contents (Lim's management company) Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-12 02

[Student]Seeing the Future Through the AR Lenses

Augmented Reality (AR) looks wondrous in movies (for instance, the screen on Iron Man’s helmet). However, the current technology is yet to catch up with the movies, and trying on the AR smart glasses in real life could be a heavy, uncomfortable, and dizzying experience. The attempts to make these experiences extra light, comfortable, and high-quality has finally bore fruit – the CEO of LetinAR, Kim Jae-hyuk (Department of Industrial Engineering, 4th year) is the hero. LetinAR, co-founded by Kim and his friend and the Chief Technology Officer Ha Jeong-hun in 2016, is a start-up company that invented and produced the AR lenses. The company has recently received investments worth 3.6 million USD from Kakao Ventures, DSC Investment, Korea Asset Investment Securities, Naver Corporation, and Platinum Tech Investment, all thanks to the self-developed 'Pin Mirror (also known as PinMRTM) lens' which has been acknowledged for its phenomenal breakthrough in the AR-lens techniques. The Pin Mirror lens. Kim Jae-hyeok (Department of Industrial Engineering, 4th year) clarified that a newer version will resemble ordinary glasses much more, compared to the old version in the picture. (Photo courtesy of LetinAR) Kim explained that the original wearable AR smart glasses had many problems. “The glasses were too big, screens were too small, or out of focus. On top of these, they were hard to manufacture.” So Kim came up with a different approach, using the pin-mirror-effect technique, in which the microdisplay light is projected directly to the eye lens via a mirror tinier than a pupil. Whereas the former lenses blurred the image when the object was too near (similar to how the human eyes blur out anything that gets too near to the pupils), the new method allows the lens to stay in focus regardless of closeness, as well as of individual eyesight. Along with the more comfortable vision, the lenses became smaller, closely resembling the ordinary glasses and had a much increased productivity. “During this year’s Consumer Electronics Show, many renowned scholars tested the lens, leaving truly impressed by its performance. They said billions of won along with the complex and latest technologies invested could not overcome the limitations of the AR lens. What we have done is provide a simple, yet powerful solution to it all,” recalled Kim. Demonstration of the LetinAR's technique in the Mobile World Congress 2018. (Photo courtesy of LetinAR) They expect to have a formal announcement of the completed technology for full-fledged commercialization next January. “AR is yet an unexplored field, but the future seems bright,” assured Kim. “Just like how we have moved from desktops to laptops, and from laptops to phones, we constantly seek portability. As with the phones, the AR glasses will lead the future trend, and they will be absorbed in our daily lives.” Thus, the goal of LetinAR is to initiate that trend, added Kim. Indeed, it is a matter of time until we will all be wearing the light and comfortable 100-inch-screen on our eyes with the help of LetinAR glasses. Kim's goal is to develop a more portable AR lens and raise LetinAR as the trend-setting company. Lim Ji-woo il04131@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-11 26

[Alumni]Byungsin Chum: the Dance of the Handicapped

Originating from ancient shamanistic rituals thousands of years ago, the Korean traditional dance later evolved into various forms, such as the court dance performed for the royal family and court officials, the folk dance including Talchum (mask dance), and the renowned Buchaechum (fan dance). Korean traditional dance has many attributes in common, mainly focused on conveying the emotions of the people along with the flow of Pansori (Korean genre of musical storytelling usually performed by a singer and a drummer). This is in sharp contrast with contemporary music, resulting in something that people only see on rare occasions. Yoon Han-sol (Department of Sociology, '90), a play director renowned for his past reinterpretation pieces of traditional art, produced another reinterpreted masterpiece on Byungsin chum (the dance of the handicapped) which has brought about both acclaim and criticism. Yoon at Seoul National Theater Byungsin chum (the dance of the handicapped), is a Korean folk dance that was performed by lower class peasants to satirize the yangban (Korean nobility). Although the dance depicts the yangban as the handicapped such as midgets, hunchbacks, the deaf, and the blind, it does not simply mimic and ridicule them. Back in the days, the handicapped were basically any individual who did poorly in society, and it gave the audience innocuous laughter. Now the times have changed with just the name of the dance being offensive enough to many people, and Yoon’s remake of it has brought about criticism in this respect. To this, Yoon did not think much of it as he has said that the dance was simply a way of storytelling in the past when there was less sensitivity on the terminology. "Directing plays acts as a self-reflecting opportunity for me. If I want to deal with topics on the unjust and corrupt, it’s impossible without keeping myself in check. It allows me to live a bit more as a righteous person." Prior to working on the “Byeongshin Chum,” Yoon directed “Ways of Storytelling, Ways of Singing” in 2014. According to Yoon, it was not because he was solely interested in Pansori or Korean tradition itself, but rather, he wanted to know why people could not personally relate to it. “We all know that it’s important that some of our tradition must be succeeded to the future generation. Quite a lot of money is being spent for this purpose, but people just don’t seem to be able to relate nor form any kind of connection to it much. So I decided to learn all about the Pansori and our tradition myself. In my plays, I showed the audience the whole process of learning Pansori, which luckily allowed the audience to understand more about the play and the songs being performed. Then I decided to move on to traditional dance.” Greenpig (name of the group that performed "Byungshin Chum") actors (Photo courtesy by Green Pig Facebook page) That is how “The Byeongshin Dance” came to be. Originally, this dance was designated as an intangible cultural asset by the government, but it was later cancelled because there was simply no successor. “I chose to work on this dance because it was not included in the genealogy of Korean traditional dance. The fact that I’m trying to interpret the dance in the name of tradition and culture may offend some traditional dancers, but I just wanted to focus on how we can all systematically pass on our culture in this modern society,” said Yoon. That is why Yoon incorporated a Kinect sensor in his play. The Kinect sensor captures full-body 3D motion, facial and voice recognition, and can be seen in games such as Xbox. Just like how one can play dance battles with Xbox, one would be able to copy and learn traditional dances. “If you go on YouTube nowadays, you see so many tutorials on all kinds of dances. This boosts the accessibility for people which I think is one of the most important conditions in passing on a culture.” Yoon was not always about producing innovative reinterpretations of plays. According to Yoon, he initially wanted to become a renowned producer. “In 2000, I went to study in the States, and that’s when 9/11 happened. It was just around the block and it really shocked me. How could anyone have that much hatred to kill thousands of people? I just couldn’t understand, and that’s when I started to question more about our society. My perspective on the world completely changed and so did my path as a play director,” said Yoon. "I’ve been looking into migration issues for quite a while now. I’ve dealt with it in some of my previous plays but want to focus on migrants and refugees in Korea and Korean refugees abroad next year." “Another incident that influenced me was after interviewing a father of the Sewol Ferry victim. When people watch devastating stories of another person like this on television, they empathize and maybe even shed tears. But the problem is the human theater effect. When the show is over, people think they are fully empathizing with society’s issues and are not turning a blind eye on them. It helps them to justify themselves for not acting on the issue. That’s why I think as a director, we shouldn’t just create content that brings light upon these issues, but it should be so that the audience is thrown with good questions that they can take back home and really think about it.” When asked for his advice and tips for students interested in his field, Yoon said, “from time to time, I hear students saying that I’m a role model. I don’t really know if this is a job that I can easily recommend. However, I can say that what’s important is that you have to have a story you want to tell, and this doesn’t just appear out of the blue. There needs to be a special relationship. A relationship with a person or an issue doesn’t just happen as well. You need to be truly interested in them, and this isn’t something you can fake.” Check out Greenpig Facebook page Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-11 26

[Student]Designing the Future Through HY-WEP

Being a university student means being open to various opportunities. This may also include developing professionalism through internships. To grant its students of such chances, Hanyang University’s Center for Academic Placement Support offers internships from smaller firms such as startups to major conglomerates through the Hanyang Work Experience Program (HY-WEP). Choi Jae-ran (Department of Industrial Engineering, 4th year) is one of the numerous students who has seized the opportunity. Choi Jae-ran (Department of Industrial Engineering, 4th year) completed her HY-WEP experience with EPIKAR in both the United States and South Korea from March to August of 2017 and participated in the National Research Foundation of Korea Work Experience Contest in November, 2018. Choi’s internship experience is a special one as she was able to work in the United States with the company called EPIKAR, a startup company that develops innovative mobility technology to alleviate efficiency. After her invaluable experience from March to August of 2017, Choi received the first prize in November of 2018, representing Hanyang University at the National Research Foundation of Korea: Work Experience Contest with the presentation topic, “Find My Roadmap.” Choi talked about her experience of working with EPIKAR and what she gained from the overseas internship through HY-WEP. Choi was responsible for designing the website of EPIKAR, the company she worked with through HY-WEP. (Photo courtesy of Choi) During her internship period, Choi was responsible for planning out “infotainment” (a combination of the words: “information” and “entertainment”) projects on automobiles’ onboard diagnostics analysis dashboard and control panels. She was able to attend the Michigan Show Car Project and planned and designed the show car’s user interface dashboard. As a result, Choi learned about the current automobile industry and market in depth. Along with cooperating and working with designers, these experiences have helped her develop work professionalism. After the internship, Choi gained an avid interest in the field of UX (user experience design) and plans on improving the related skills. Choi learned about the field of UX (user experience design) during her HY-WEP experience and hopes to further develop related skills. (Photo courtesy of Choi) When asked what some of the benefits of HY-WEP are, Choi answered, “in the majority of cases, HY-WEP is related to startups, so the task and role you receive may be quite diverse. This enables interns to experience a broad range of work which will surely be helpful in the long run.” In addition, Choi advised those who are applying to emphasize the importance of setting the goal straight away as well as what can be achieved from the internship in the self-introductory paper. For the upcoming HY-WEP, the Center for Academic Placement Support is offering an eight-week internship opportunity for Hanyang University students who have completed more than four semesters. The first round of the application period is to end on November 30th, 2018, and the additional application period will take part in December. More information can be found on the HY-WEP website. Seok Ga-ram carpethediem@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-11 12

[Alumni]From a Windsurfer to a Sports Commentator

Watching a live sports broadcast is thrilling at times, but it may be difficult to keep track of the flow of the match and the movements of the participating players without some explanation. This is where the role of a sports commentator comes into place. Sports commentators work to deliver accurate information to spectators with a running commentary of the game and play a crucial part in all live sports broadcasts. Hanyang University alumnus, Kim Woo-jin (Sport Coaching Major, ’11) has been working as a sports commentator for STN SPORTS channel starting from the beginning of 2018 and has commentated live broadcasts such as the 2018 Asian Para Games held in Jakarta, Indonesia, and the K-Leave FA Cup in South Korea. Kim Woo-jin (Sport Coaching Major, '11) stated that taking sports related courses in his major greatly contibuted to his career as a sports commentator. Prior to his career as a sports commentator, Kim was a windsurfer representing Hanyang University. Kim started windsurfing in middle school largely due to his parents’ recommendation, as they also enjoyed the sport as a hobby in the past. During his university years as a windsurfer, Kim competed in various competitions and even received a gold medal in a national windsurfing competition hosted by Gachon University. After graduating in 2011 with a major in Sport Coaching, Kim became a windsurfing coach for Gwangnam High School and prepared student players for the Asian Cup. However, while concentrating on player development for three years, Kim began to gain interest in the field of broadcasting as he had always enjoyed watching live sports matches. “While preparing to become a sports commentator, I was deeply inspired by the SBS announcer, Bae Kee-wan, also a Hanyang University alumnus renowned for his commentary of past figure skater, Kim Yuna’s performances. I monitored a lot of his commentaries because he was well aware of the current trends in broadcasting,” stated Kim. (Left) Kim Woo-jin (Sport Coaching Major, '11) is commentating during Round 27 of the K-League Football National League. The road to becoming a sports commentator was not an easy one. Not only are a few sports commentators selected by broadcasters but also a thorough understanding of various sports is required to deliver swift commentaries to viewers. However, he was able to succeed and began his career at STN SPORTS channel. Although there is always a tacit pressure not to make mistakes during the live broadcast, Kim said that he gets more energetic after hearing the crowd cheer on near the broadcasting booth. One of the most memorable moments as a sports commentator was when the South Korean swimmer Cho Won-sang earned a silver medal during the live 2018 Asian Para Games. “It was surreal to see the South Korean flag go up during the medal ceremony,” said Kim. When asked about what important aspects sports commentators should have, Kim emphasized that loving all kinds of sports and enjoying the different atmospheres of the games is important. Moreover, having a deep knowledge of football, basketball, and baseball is crucial. “I recommend getting a referee certificate to those preparing to become a sports commentator because it will act as an advantage,” advised Kim. Kim Woo-jin (Major in Sport Coaching, '11) hopes to commentate live matches of South Korean players in the future Olympic Games. Kim is currently striving to become a sports commentator in a wide range of sports. The main goal for Kim is to be able to effectively deliver South Korea’s winning moments in international sports events, and he hopes to be able to broadcast the future Olympic games live. Seok Ga-ram carpethediem@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-11 05

[Student]Students from the School of Business Pass the 35th Customs Broker Examination

A banner congratulating those who passed the examination to be a certified customs broker was displayed in the School of Business at Hanyang University. On September 19th of this year, the names of applicants that passed the second-round of the 35th certified customs broker examination were announced. Names such as Kim Yoo-min (School of Business, 4th year) and Kim Ji-hoon (School of Business, 4th year) were proudly displayed. (From left) Kim Ji-hoon (School of Business, 4th year) and Kim Yoo-min (School of Business, 4th year) are pointing at their names in the banner that reads, "Congratulations on passing the 35th Customs Broker Exam 2018." A customs broker clears shipments of imported and exported goods. The Customs Broker Exam is held each year, and the percentage of candidates that passed this year was 37.95 percent for the first-round and 6.62 percent for the second-round, indicating the difficulty in becoming a customs broker. The first-round of the exam consisted of multiple choice questions, while the second-round consisted of essay questions. Every subject is scored out of 100, and those who receive more than 40 points or higher on every subject (the average is 60) pass the exam. However, when those who pass 60 points are less than the required number of people, which was 90 people total, those with the higher average pass the exam. Kim Yoo-min passed the exam with an average score of 58 and Kim Ji-hoon with 61. (From left to right) News H interviewed Kim Yoo-min (School of Business, 4th year) and Kim Ji-hoon (School of Business, 4th year) on November 2nd, 2018. Kim Ji-hoon started studying for the exam in 2014, and it took him 4 years to pass the exam this year. For Kim Yoo-min, the preparation for the examination took 1 and a half years. They both studied day and night. Kim Ji-hoon preferred to study at school, setting a goal to study from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. They both agreed that the examination necessitates heavy loads of memorizing. They emphasized that repeating the studying process and constantly writing the content out is very important. In order to memorize effectively, Kim Ji-hoon wrote everything he learned in one book and kept going back to it. “It’s easy to forget even the things you studied yesterday. Memorizing by making acronyms or creating a sentence using the important words helps to effectively memorize a large quantity of content." From January to June is the period for the trial examination. There are 24 mock tests in total, and students take them weekly. Since scores over 60 are not common, curved-grading is done on the test scores. “It feels devastating when I don’t get in the top 90," said Kim Yoo-min. Kim Ji-hoon agreed and added that repeating the studying process gets exhausting, and the pressure to obtain a high score makes things very hard to go on. A sample of one of Ji-hoon's books that he used to increase the effectiveness of memorizing (Photo courtesy of Kim) To cope with all the stress from studying, Kim Ji-hoon and Kim Yoo-min took a day off after the trial examination ended. They would forget about the test and watch television, meet friends, or eat delicious food to refresh their minds. “One thing I took with me from studying for the customs broker examination is swimming. Swimming helped me get through the long days of studying in a healthy state," said Kim Yoo-min. Hanyang University does not have departments or classes related to commerce and trade. This can make things a little more difficult for those planning on or who are already preparing for the Customs Broker Examination. “Just try to get the exam over with as quickly as possible. Effectiveness runs low if the studying period increases,” said Kim Ji-hoon. “I hope luck is with you. You might see what you memorized the night before in the examination paper. Also, it is rather hard to find someone that is preparing to become a customs broker inside Hanyang University, but I still recommend you to look for and be connected with those who are in the same position as you,” added Kim Yoo-min. After the long and what seemed like never-ending days of fighting with oneself, Kim Ji-hoon and Kim Yoo-min are now taking in some deep breaths before they go on to plan for another goal. They plan on taking some days off before they attend vocational education in January of the following year. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-10 29

[Student]Challenge Yourselves, Youth!

Graduate students from the Department of Mechanical Engineering who are also members of the team, Machine Dynamics Laboratory won first place in the IEEE VTS Motor Vehicles Challenge, 2018. The members include Lee Woong (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doctoral Program), Jeong Hae-seong and Park Do-hyun (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Integrated Master’s-Doctor’s Program). IEEE stands for Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and VTS stands for Vehicular Technology Society. The team was invited to the IEEE VPPC (Vehicle Power And Propulsion Conference) held in Chicago, IL, USA, from the 27th to the 30th of August this year, which they presented their research findings and earned 3000 dollars as their first place prize. (From left) The team leader, Lee Woong (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doctoral Program) and two team members Jeong Hae-seong and Park Do-hyun (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Integrated Master’s-Doctor’s Program) were able to receive first prize in the VTS challenge with the guidance of their advisor for their team, professor Kim Nam-wook (Department of Mechanical Engineering). The VTS challenge competes for minimization of energy consumption and aims to develop a control strategy that can be applied to real cars. This year, the challenge was to minimize the mileage energy consumption of General Motors (GM) hybrid vehicle, ‘Volt 1st gen.' 52 teams from 20 countries participated in the challenge. The online posting regarding the opening of the VTS challenge were uploaded on January 5th, so the team had two months of preparation before the energy management submission deadline in March. The results were announced the following month. In the evaluation process, the jurors for the competition run the simulation model by themselves and whichever vehicle that consumes the least energy wins first place. The Machine Dynamics Laboratory team applied one of the optimal control theory called, ‘Pontryagin’s minimum principle.' It decides the relative value of the quantity of fuel and electricity and minimizes it. The system itself constantly monitors the remaining oil and electricity and decides whether to use more fuels or electric motor. Without a doubt, the final results had to be good due to the characteristic of hybrid cars to increase energy efficiency when the remainder quantity is similar. Members of the Machine Dynamics Laboratory explained that they have been researching cars for 3 years, yet this was the first time to receive such an honorable reward. (Photo courtesy of Lee) The VTS challenge is held every year but with a different subject and vehicle to work with. “Nothing is for certain yet, but maybe for next year’s competition, our team members will participate as leaders.” Lee Woong (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doctoral Program) who actively took part in the VTS challenge as a leader went on to say, “challenge yourselves, youth!” Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-10 29

[Alumni]Carrying Out “Love in Deed” as a Researcher in Korean Dance

Dance is a form of art at a holistic and advanced stage, and it can have an enormous social influence. Also known as a “moving poem,” it can be difficult to translate a dance into solid writing because there are countless expressions connoted in it. However, Hanyang University alumnus, Kim Yoon-ji (Department of Dance, '01), has continued to put her efforts into promoting the excellence of Korean dance in various research. She has succeeded in conducting both independent and joint research converging the concept of dance and the contemporary issues on the rise. Kim’s passion for dance has led her to become the biggest research fund beneficiary in the field of dance in the last five years, receiving 16.4 million won. Hanyang University's Department of Dance alumnus, Kim Yoon-ji stated that when an artist’s spirit and technique are added to the comprehensive and intrinsic human movements, it becomes a dance. After entering the Department of Dance to major in Korean dance at Hanyang University in 1997, the IMF financial crisis hit hard and brought about some hardships. Kim had no choice but to study and dance diligently. Her efforts paid off as she graduated with honors. “I received a lot from Hanyang University, which made me the person I am today, and I want to give the pleasure back to the university in any way possible as gratitude,” stated Kim. Kim Yoon-ji (middle) on her Hanyang University graduate school graduation day in 2013. Reading books and regularly going to Paiknam Library were part of her daily routine and deeply contributed to choosing her career as a researcher and adjunct professor after university graduation. “Whenever I had hardships, I turned to reading, which the words gave me wisdom on how to live through my studies,” maintained Kim. She decided to enter graduate school and went on to receive her master’s degree and doctoral degree from the Department of Dance. Hanyang University alumnus, Kim Yoon-ji (Department of Dance, '01) asserted that doing research is interesting as it requires combining various information to come to a creative yet logical conclusion. Some of Kim’s research projects, both independent and joint, are currently ongoing. One of her independent research projects titled, “Application of Korean Dance Contents Module on Extension of the Trans-Media Storytelling Area," was selected by the National Research Foundation of Korea. The research is based on the effects of trans-media storytelling on Korean dance by converging various digital media platforms to convey the story of the performances more efficiently. Furthermore, the three year joint research project titled, “Comprehensive Database Project for Lexicography Informations” gathers researchers from numerous fields to build up data in order to grant the public access to good knowledge. Kim is currently responsible for the intangible performances and folklores section. “I want to become a humble intellectual who can carry out love in deed, especially to Hanyang University, and I wish for all Hanyang University students to pursue their own happiness,” Kim concluded. She plans on continuing her study of converging Korean dance with society as a researcher and promote the artistry of Korean dance to the international community. Seok Ga-ram carpethediem@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-10 22

[Student]A New Horizon for Audiobooks

With the advent of Audible, an audiobook service by Amazon, audiobooks have been gaining enormous popularity. The fact that people can listen to books with voiceovers regardless of the place and time makes it even more convenient, and the user range can include the visually handicapped as well. However, not being able to personally select the desirable voiceover may be conventional. In order to improve the traditional audiobooks out in the current market, a startup team named LionRocket consisting of three Hanyang University student entrepreneurs gathered to create audiobooks using different voices, including celebrities. The LionRocket team, formed in February 2018, has seized various opportunities and was awarded prizes for winning numerous startup competitions. In the recent 2018 Excellent University Startup Competition in Seoul, held on September 20th, 2018, the team was awarded the prize of excellence. (From left) LionRocket's Mun Hyung-jun (Department of Information Systems, 2nd year), Park Jun-hyung (Department of Information Systems, 4th year), and Jeong Seung-hwan (Department of Information Systems, 4th year) won the prize of excellence at the 2018 University Startup Competition in Seoul, held on September 20th, 2018. (Photo Courtesy of Jeong) LionRocket’s Jeong Seung-hwan (Department of Information Systems, 4th year), Mun Hyung-jun (Department of Information Systems, 2nd year), and Park Jun-hyung (Department of Information Systems, 4th year) are friends in the same major who had the same interests in starting a startup company. The main goal of LionRocket is to provide audiobooks with various voiceovers customers can select from. “I was inspired by a presenter’s similar topic at a developer conference in 2017 and decided to start the business that could initially contribute to the visually handicapped who would have difficulties reading a written book,” stated Jeong, the representative of LionRocket. LionRocket’s current business plan consists of implementing a deep learning system and Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to replace the original text-to-speech (TTs) technology, which tends to sound unnatural due to its mechanical sounds. LionRocket members talk about the difficult process they went through in order to develop their business plan. (From left), Park Jun-hyung (Department of Information Systems, 4th year), Jeong Seung-hwan (Department of Information Systems, 4th year), Mun Hyung-jun (Department of Information Systems, 2nd year) The three students take roles in the audiobook development process. As the representatives of LionRocket, Jeong focuses on taking care of the general project, and Park is responsible for analyzing the preprocessing of Korean language data most suitable for the AI. Mun designs and maintains the deep learning model. The current business model is yet to be completed but the team has been periodically uploading their work videos on YouTube. (Link to LionRocket's YouTube channel) Business model planning was not an easy process in the beginning. As the members lacked financial support and knowledge in artificial intelligence (AI), they had to spend their own money in the first month to initiate the plan. However, after receiving subsidy from Hanium, a center that provides IT talent training, and collecting prize money from winning various university startup competitions, they were able to utilize a GPU with a deep learning service and start their studies on AI. LionRocket is now awaiting government subsidy. (From left), Mun Hyung-jun (Department of Information Systems, 2nd grade), Jeong Seung-hwan (Department of Information Systems, 4th grade), and Park Jun-hyung (Department of Information Systems, 4th grade) hope they will be able to provide the audiobook service to the public by the end of 2018. LionRocket is in the process of negotiating with the publishers in order to provide the service to the public hopefully by the end of 2018. Their long-term goals for the business is to gain 50,000 users and provide these audiobooks to the visually impaired as soon as possible. Mun stated that he would wish nothing more than to take the subway and see people using the application in the future. “As we are a team of engineering students, we lack marketing and design skills. It would be nice if there is someone interested in working together after checking some of our work online,” hoped Jeong. Seok Ga-ram carpethediem@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Guen-hyung