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2018-03 11

[General]Silent Criminals in the Corner

Peeping Toms are becoming a serious issue in Korea these days, with the number of victims rising. The so-called ‘hidden camera,’ ‘illegal shooting,’ and ‘secret camera’ are attracting more attention as there is an increasingly loud voice calling for strict measures. It is a form of crime where a person secretly takes a picture of or films another and spreads it or takes pleasure themselves. The place of illegal shooting ranges from subways and their stations to public toilets and saunas. How is Hanyang’s safety regarding this issue? Let us take a look at our campus’s status. Fortunate, but not to be relieved Through many public interviews, it was revealed that many women stay alert when using public facilities, especially bathrooms. In most cases, fear is generated in them due to the awareness of hidden cameras that may be filming them, heightened by the possibility of the footage being spread online. What is very pitiful is the fact that the advancement of technology is acting in favor of this illegal act. The unnoticeably small size of the camera makes them next to impossible to detect at a glance. Articles reporting on hidden cameras are appearing daily in headlines in Korea. Is Hanyang safe from this crime? A rumor based on true incidents spread among students that a student had a secret camera on the body and was filming another student. With rising voices and heightened tension, Hanyang’s Property Management Team is regularly executing hidden camera inspections four times a year. According to the inspection last year that ran from June 12th to June 17th which examined every single women’s bathroom throughout the campus, the outcome was positive: not a single hidden camera was detected. The investigation takes place from night time to dawn when there are fewer users of the bathrooms to minimize disturbance. Kim Hyeon-min, a staff of the Property Management Team “It takes about a week to examine all the women's bathrooms on campus. We make sure to go through every single one of them. Fortunately, no camera was detected. Although we are going to continue with our detection program to make sure that our campus is safe, the best way to put a stop to this issue is to stop the installation of hidden cameras from the beginning,” said Kim Hyeon-min from the Property Management Team. Despite the satisfying outcome of the investigation, the rumors among the students cannot be ignored. From both inside and outside of our campus, hidden cameras and secret cameras are becoming a more serious crime that leads to heightened tension and nervous attitudes. Let’s keep it up Besides the efforts of the Property Management Team, some groups of individual students and the student council are voluntarily running a project involving renting a hidden camera detecting machine and scrutinizing bathrooms. The machine is a high performance, high-frequency detecting device that can locate a hidden camera if one is present. In addition, Seong-dong Police Station conducted a hidden camera detection program that inspected all the bathrooms and changing rooms on campus, the result of which was also clear. Furthermore, on ERICA campus, students are stepping out of their comfort zone and doing the investigation by themselves with the camera detector. Derived from these situations is the fact that Hanyang is free of installed hidden cameras. From these investigations and their results, it could be concluded that Hanyang is safe from hidden cameras. However, it is too early to be relieved because not every inch of the campus has been inspected. In order to prevent such crimes from flourishing on campus, efforts and awareness of both the students and the faculty are needed. Students who participated in hidden camera detection activity last month (Photo courtesy of Kukminilbo) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-03 05

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] The Result of a Small Curiosity

For centuries, cancer has been mankind’s mulish enemy that has taken away countless lives. Scientists and researchers are unceasingly putting effort into developing a cure for cancer, including Choi Je-min (Department of Life Science) who recently paved another road to effectively treating cancer in his paper “Regulation of chitinase-3-like-1 in T cell elicits Th1 and cytotoxic responses to inhibit lung metastasis.” First, starting his research from a small curiosity for a certain component in our cell called chitinase, Choi unveiled the secret related to the immune system for cancer and accomplished the first step of creating a drug for the disease. "My research began from the question 'why?'" Chitin may sound familiar due to its presence in the exoskeletons of arthropods such as crabs, lobsters, and shrimps and some insects and molluscs. A derivative of the word is chitinase, which is a component that reshapes or dissolves and digests chitin for animals. Such a component also exists in the human body, which has no specific function of its own. Knowing this fact, Choi was eager to find out why it still exists in our body and what it does. Without a function, the component lost its name and has come to be called ‘chitinase-3-like-1.’ “If it is completely useless, why do we have it? When such a question arises, we biologists experiment in one of two ways: remove it or increase its amount. In this case, I decided to remove it to see what happens in the testing mouse. Since chitinase is used to protect the body in plants, I guessed that it would have something to do with our immune system.” After removing the component from the mouse, Choi’s discovery was surprising. The type of cell called T cell which plays a key role in cell-mediated immunity, specifically Th1 and CTL, were greatly activated. In other words, chitinase-3-like-1 were acting as the deactivator of the T cells, which play a central role in battling cancer. Choi had two model mice in his experiment, one with the component and the other without it. He inserted cancer cells in both mice and compared the outcome. Expectedly, the mouse without the component showed much lower development of cancer while the other showed the opposite. This means by removing chitinase-3-like-1, which allows the T cells to be activated, immunity for cancer considerably increases. “The experiment let me figure out that if chitinase-3-like-1 are removed from our body, it could work as an excellent anticancer treatment.” Quenchingly, his question was answered by the result of his experiment. Choi and his students are conducting their research on chitinase-3-like-1. Based on his finding, Choi took another step to develop an anticancer drug. Since it is impossible to remove DNA from the human body, there had to be another way to remove the component from our body. Therefore, he went ahead and worked to create a drug that restrains the chitinase-3-like-1-creating DNA from producing more of the component. With a technique called RNA-interference which removes the undesired or mutated RNA in the body, Choi targeted the chitinase-3-like-1 RNA after converting it to RNA from DNA and attempted to remove the undesired component to increase cancer immunity. Using a technique called peptide-based drug delivery, Choi attached the RNA version of the component with peptide bonds in the drug and aimed to spread the medicament throughout the body. This resulted in deactivation of the chitinase-3-like-1-creating DNA and thus an escalation of cancer immunity. “Although it could take about a decade before this drug becomes commercialized and widely used, it could be a breakthrough once it does. The underlying prinicple of my research is always to produce a useful outcome that could actually be put into use and not just end in the lab. I could say that our establishment philosophy ‘Love in deed’ fits well with my goal,” smiled Choi. He emphasized that it is always important to sometimes question the basic things, even the things that are already proven to be a fact. Through his research and experiments, Choi wants to discover more unknown facts. Choi will continue his research to experiment with cells and create more drugs to be used practically. "'Love in deed' in the laboratory!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hayang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-02 26

[Alumni]For Africa, In Africa

What are some of the most common preconceived notions of Africa? You might likely think of it as a place of less development, fatal diseases, and torrid weather. However, people with analytic insight will say that it is a place full of potentially infinite development. Jin Seung-soo (Division of Mechanical Engineering, ’09), dedicating his passion in making Africa a better country, is a member of the African Development Bank (AfDB). Jin shared his story of working in Africa this week. Collaboration is the key AfDB is an intercontinental development finance institution whose objective is to alleviate poverty and improve living conditions in Africa, with aims to develop its social and economic status at large. Currently consisting of 80 member countries, 54 of which are African countries and the rest, non-African countries, the organization is staying faithful to its mission through supporting projects and programs that foster the economic and social development of the country. Counseling and financing for development, the AfDB provides grants, concessional loans, and non-concessional loans which are mainly used to build large-scale infrastructure and for economic policy reformation or empowerment. "In an international finance institute like AfDB, there are people from diverse fields of study." (Photo courtesy of Jin) Upon entering the AfDB in 2013, Jin is currently in the Republic of Cote d’Ivoire where the headquarters is located and is taking charge of developing energy projects for Eastern Africa. He is an energy finance expert, mainly responsible for leading the energy project financing. In other cases, he is a financial specialist who analyzes the profitability and economic validity of the finance project. When the African government or a private sector requests finances for energy projects, the AfDB’s sector expert supports them as a task manager and forms an appraisal team with specialists like Jin in addition to other specialists such as environmental and social specialists, legal specialists, and credit risk specialists. The team would then make decisions regarding the financing for the project. Taking a glimpse into Jin’s career in Africa, there seems to be little connection between his major Mechanical Engineering and his financing work. Jin accounted for this seemingly divergent career path: “since I was an university student, I was interested in other fields outside of the Engineering Department such as management and finance. I once took a course and studied plants, which triggered my interest in project financing. Being a part of the strategy for the planning team of Samsung C&T Corporation and Samsung LED, I added financial knowledge on top of my engineering knowledge. Then, I grew ambitious and wanted to use my competency to do something big.” Afterwards, Jin quit working in Samsung and got his M.A. degree in Business Administration from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). Having studied both engineering and finance, Jin was eager to find the merging point between the two fields. He finally came to the conclusion that he would finance projects, which led Jin to challenge himself in Africa in a sequence. A project for providing clean water (Photo courtesy of AfDB) The potential to create greater impact With its growth rate exceeding that of the world’s rate, Africa is being spotlighted for development investments, displaying an infinitude of possibilities for development around just about every corner of the country. Working for and living in Africa for several years now, Jin has been witnessing the growth of the country while at the same time being involved in its development. “Currently, Africa isn’t a very stable country, which is why many countries are deterred from investing in it. In the case of Korea, it is maintaining its speculative stance toward Africa since it classifies the country as a risk. However, Africa has a very high growth rate and a strikingly low development level, which brings the effect of development to its climax,” commented Jin. As aforementioned, Jin’s job is to analyze the economic validity of a project as a financial analyst. He feels the highest sense of achievement when the project he financed develops into a beneficial one, both financially and economically. He recalled one of his most rewarding performances while financing South Africa’s Concentrate solar power plant project, where earning the approval from the bank was very difficult due to a profitability-related matter. Despite the fact that Jin was a newly recruited member, he was a big help in that situation. “It is always a very good thing to see people’s lifestyle changing due to the changes of development. Providing electricity to the region where there is no electricity, for example, would completely change people’s lives. Furthermore, the electricity could be used to further develop the area. Thinking about all the awaiting developments, it feels very gratifying and valuable. As an energy finance expert, Jin’s goal in the long run is to promote as much investment as possible and contribute in its energy development. Furthermore, he envisions promoting investments to Africa from Korea and building a bridge between the two countries and allowing Korean corporations to enter Africa. “For all the students who dream of working for the promotion of global welfare, there are three things to keep in mind: First, fluency in a second or even a third language and expertise in your field are indispensable. Second, experience is crucial. It is never easy to enter an international organization, which means that in order to increase your competency, having related experience could lift you up and serve as an essential background. Last, suitability and perseverance are required. A large institute is not a place you can get into right after graduating from school. You need a definite goal and supporting plans to eventually achieve your dream. Failure is not to be feared!” "Africa has infinite potential for development." (Photo courtesy of Dong A) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-02 12

[Alumni]A Proud and Blissful Architect

“At the age of 85, looking back at my life, I am very happy and thankful,” began Yu. Yu Hi-jun (Department of Architecture, ’58) is a Hanyang alumnus and an emeritus professor who taught at Hanyang for 34 years. Having experienced, learned, and achieved a lot in his long journey of life as an architect, Yu has a shining story to share. An architect and an artist Almost every day, Yu goes to a coffee shop nearby his house alone and enjoys a cup of coffee for a good two hours. “I like to look back at my life to recall my deeds and ponder whether I’ve led a good life or not.” It all started with Yu’s hobby of drawing a continuous pattern on paper every weekend, which gladly and willingly imprisoned Yu in his room. Since he was in middle school, Yu unconsciously showed his talent in art. “One time, when I was a first grader in middle school, my teacher told us to draw a sketch of the school building. Afterwards, he would put every piece of work on the front board and let it be evaluated openly by all of his classmates. When he saw mine, he said it wasn’t just a mere sketch,” remembered Yu. From this and several other incidents, Yu began to discover his talent in art and architecture. There had been many ups and downs in Yu’s life before entering Hanyang’s Department of Architecture, such as being captured by the military troop, the Korean War on the 25th of June in 1950, and following months of starvation. Due to the war, Yu was not able to make it to highschool graduation. However, this did not stop him from going to university. During his years in Hanyang, his talent in drawing and architecture became more prevalent and outstanding that it attracted popularity and attention from in and out of the school. Eventually, during the days when going abroad to study was as rare as being nearly impossible, Yu went to America to extend his studies in architecture for graduate school in Iowa. He attempted to earn his tuition fee by getting a job in a design office. “When I was walking in Hanyang campus one day, I was determined to make Hanyang University a better school with my own hands," commented Yu. One thing that triggered Yu’s desire for studying further was the frustration he received when his professor frequently remarked, ‘there’s something great about this work.’ Yu was more than desperate to find out what that “something” was, which he quenchingly found the answer to after his research and studies in America and during his long years of teaching in Hanyang. The answer was brought to Yu by his accumulation of knowledge and skills as an artist and an architect. Building up on his talent, his hunger for studying and ambition for the future enabled Yu to overcome his past hardships, and that drove him forward. Having studied abroad, Yoo's fluency in English is not surprising. Built in the past, stands through the future “My philosophy in architecture is creativity. Regardless of the type of art, once seen, it should ring a pounding beat to one’s heart at the first sight. I was once requested to design a cathedral. After completing it, I imagined the situation where I had to put rows of mattresses because I was afraid people who saw it for the first time would scream and fall back,” said Yu, half jokingly. He revealed that his source of inspiration is his knowledge and all the theories he has studied. Yu takes a shower before starting his work to freshen up his body and mind. “The theories and concepts I’ve studied have become a great stimulus, and that’s where my inspiration comes from.” Being the receiver of the 21st Catholic Art Special Prize this week, Yu’s notable list of achievements goes on and on. Starting with the former president Park Jung-hee’s office, Yu turned out to be the one who designed the architecture of the Blue House’s (the Korean Presidential Residence) Reception Hall. In addition, after president Park’s wife had become deceased, Yu was requested to remodel her bedroom. He was even requested to design the office of the Minister of Foreign Affairs by the president. It was evident that Yu’s sense of architecture was at the level of wide recognition and appreciation, even by the president, so much so, that he was almost single-handedly responsible for such tasks. From designing several cathedrals to numerous buildings and from writing a number of books, there have been countless achievements Yu has accomplished in his life. Yu remembers the day when he was in a bookstore in Canada looking for books related to architecture and feeling inexplicably happy. He was so happy that he was able to study and learn and be who he was. His passion for studying and architecture has never seemed to dwindle. From December of 2015 to December of 2016, Yu’s private exhibition by the name of ‘Passion’ was held, expressing his happiness and thankfulness of his life. His passion and devotion to art and architecture will remain enthusiastic in his works. The Reception Hall of Cheongwadae, the Korean Presidential Residence (Photo courtesy of enacademic.com) Three of the paintings from Yu's 'Passion' (Photo courtesy of galleryro.net) "You need to discover your own path. Otherwise, it won't open." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-02 04

[Academics][Excellent R&D] From Harmful to Useful

It is undoubtable that global warming and air pollution are two of the most serious and urgent problems that countries all over the world need to worry about as members of the planet. However, due to the industrial development and the necessities of life, goals and promises of reducing harmful gas are not successfully being met by the majority of the countries that pledge to do so. Sang Byoung-in (Department of Chemical Engineering), in an attempt to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, has suggested a way to make use of the bountiful resources around us in his research by the name, ‘Power to Gas Technology for Stability of Future Energy Provision.’ "The amount of carbon dioxide can be effectively reduced by capturing it and turning it into a useful gas." Previously, there has been an approach suggested to reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. It was to capture and store it, then bury it deep underground or under the ocean ground so that it would not cause any pollution in the air. This method is not being pervasively used because of the unfitting geological condition of Korea and its tremendous cost considering the amount of carbon dioxide that needs to be handled. To counteract this complication, Sang researched methods to utilize the captured carbon dioxide. By capturing the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and separating hydrogen and methane in it, a new source of energy is created. Since methane gas is used in almost every aspect of our society, Sang’s research could greatly contribute to alleviating the current situation concerning air pollution and energy depletion. “Hydrogen could also be derived, but methane is a better option as it has a much wider range of usage and that it is far easier to store. Hydrogen would require costly equipment to deposit, unlike methane, which could be stored within affordability.” There are several reasons why methane gas is such a good product out of carbon dioxide. Since methane gas is commonly used in our daily life, converting carbon dioxide into methane gas would be both economically and environmentally favorable. It also means this new source of energy will be extremely convenient and effortless to supply. Since 90 to 100 percent of Korea is covered with methane gas pipelines, the newly generated energy will be conveniently supplied through the current infrastructure. Moreover, unlike other gases such as hydrogen, methane gas is easy to store because it does not require a special tank for storage. Hydrogen is difficult to store due to its minuscule molecular size, demanding special tanks of higher price. Most importantly, methane gas is incomparably more widely used—for power, heat, mobility, and more. By turning carbon dioxide into mathane, useful energy can be generated. (Photo courtesy of Sang) Furthermore, Sang’s research also focuses on cultivating the microorganism that produces methane on its own only by feeding on carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Such a microorganism is called hydrogenotrophic methanogen (methane-producing organism that feed on hydrogen), which could be cultivated in water of 55 to 65 degrees Celsius. Inside water, just by absorbing carbon dioxide and hydrogen, the microorganism could produce methane. The problem is, these microorganisms are quite fastidious and challenging to harvest. They are strictly anaerobic, meaning they cannot survive once they encounter oxygen. To overcome this challege, Sang is currently researching to successfully nurture the microorganism. In addition, his further goal of research is to cultivate methanogen that does not require hydrogen. The reason why the microorganism feeds on hydrogen is because they need electrons in it. However, Sang wants to cut down the cost of nurturing these microorganism by removing hydrogen in their production. To provide what they need for survival, Sang will research deeper on feeding the microorganism directly from the electrode so that the process of microorganism producing methane would be more effective in terms of cost and productivity. Sang and his students in his lab are researching to evolve microorganism that feeds on electrons. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-01 28

[Special][Op-ed] Invisible and Silent, Yet Deadly

What are some of the best-selling items these days? Sanitary masks are, indeed, one of the most compelling products. There has been a 380 percent increase in nasal sanitizer product sales, with a 213 percent rise in sanitary mask sales. What is the cause of this phenomenon? The severity of the fine dust in the air seems to be the catalyst of the sales boom. With the emission of toxicant chemicals from automobiles and industrial sites being the main culprit of the fine dust pollution crisis, Korean is going through a major pollution issue and is on its way to address that problem. What’s all the fuss about? Recently, emergency text messages informing citizens that the fine dust level is particularly bad that day are sent directly from the government, not to mention the myriad of people that can be seen wearing sanitary masks outdoors. This means the situation is really getting serious now, unquestionably demanding some counteractions to be taken. Korea has the highest density of fine dust concentration among the member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), recording 32 micrograms of fine dust per cubic meter, while Iceland is on record for being the least polluted country, showing 2.9 micrograms of fine dust per cubic meter. The size of fine dust is about seven times smaller than the width of an average person’s hair, which can freely and effortlessly enter human bodies through the nasal cavity or through the skin, reaching deep inside and inducing various health issues such as dementia, stroke, dysrhythmia, angiosis, hair loss, nasal inflammation and much more. The biggest problem with the fine dust is that the particles are so small that they are unfilterable, meaning they can get to any part of the body and cause a wide variety of diseases. Fine dust is seven times smaller than a strand of hair. Among the developed nations in the OECD, South Korea has the worst air pollution. (Photo courtesy of npr.org) It is not the thought that counts, it is the action It is not hard to figure out that there is no quick-fix solution for Korea’s situation now. In response to the deteriorating issue, the Korean Ministry took action: since the harmful emission from automobiles is a great contributor to the overall situation, the government hoped to entice people to take public transportation by making it free of charge for one day. Though it sounds reasonable, this approach received considerable criticism for several reasons. First of all, this solution is only temporary, yet very costly. Moreover, voices were heard that the money should rather have been invested in developing technologies to converting current automobiles into electronic or other non-harmful types or in developing technologies to absorb or cleanse the polluted air. This approach was one of the four emergency actions established by the government, which are to be taken as the situation gets irrevocably worse. The other actions include an odd-even license plate policy (cars with license plates that end in an odd number can only be driven on an odd number date and vice versa), the reduction of factory operation hours, and the closing of parking lots. All these approaches evidently aim to reduce the toxic emissions from automobiles but do not aim to provide an alternative direction to remove the root of the problem. Citizens express great dissatisfaction about the actions the government has taken, voicing that they are only temporarily or partially resolving the trouble. However, to remove the root cause of the whole situation would cost a lot of money and if the government raises the tax rate to do so, people will surely show hostility as well. In an individualistic society, such as the one we live in today, people would care more about their own future than their country’s. In such a case, how can the government afford to meet both the requirements of the people and this monstrous disaster? Being aware that the silent monster is growing more and more powerful everyday, both the government and citizens are nervous. What we need in this situation is not arguments and criticisms but cooperation. The current situation necessitates a multilateral approach since its scale has exceeded the moderate level. More than one solution should be carried out by more than one group of people. An unilateral solution cannot effectively address such problem, meaning the government alone cannot single-handedly resolve the tragedy. There must be a cooperation between the government and the people, at the level of both individuals and corporations. The government should provide the least burdensome and the most effective solution and the citizens should cooperate in order to maximize the effect and to defeat the common enemy. Fine dust overwhelmingly covers the city. (Photo courtesy of DBpia Report for Research) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@haynayg.ac.kr

2018-01 21

[Student]Melody of Sincerity

"How will you financially be successful in that path?" was the question Park got most frequently after becoming determined that he would become a harmonicist. Since he was a young boy, Park Jong-seong (Department of String and Wind Instruments majoring in Orchestra Conducting, Master’s program) had many opportunities to encounter music and learn various instruments thanks to his pianist mother. The one that enchanted Park the most was not the piano, the violin, or the flute, but the harmonica. Having studied harmonica and composition since high school, Park became a talented harmonicist player and song-writer who is dreaming of becoming a conductor in the future. The thrill of impressive touchingness Park first encountered the harmonica when he was in elementary school. He only considered the instrument as a good hobby and something he could have fun with, until his harmonica teacher suggested him to participate in a harmonica contest held in Japan. Park agreed to the suggestion and ended up receiving the grand prize, which brought his teacher to tears of happiness. “The teacher is someone who is so precious and valuable to me. He is a great person of wonderful personality who was so loving and dedicating. After receiving the grand prize and seeing him crying, I felt like I repaid for all the love I’ve received from him with music. This is when I decided that I would become a harmonicist.” Moreover, lucky for Park, the contest was also a concert for professional harmonica players, the performance which further inspired him to become a harmonicist. Park saw an old Japanese harmonicist who stepped onto the stage with a walking aid due to his weak legs, his harsh breaths clearly audible during his performance. “The sound that man produced was simply mesmerizing. It was so touching that it even made me feel jealous of his professionality. At that moment, my dream became solidified,” reminisced Park. The thrill that vibrated Park’s heart that day was the pivotal event that set his path toward becoming a harmonicist. "For my song composition, the inspiration comes from my daily life." Nonetheless, his decision was not always unchanging. While in high school, he studied music composition because he thought going to a university and majoring in composition would be the most helpful stepping stone for his dream since there is no school in Korea that has harmonica as a major,. Park realized that the history of harmonica is relatively very short and there are not many songs written for harmonica. Such bitterness urged him to become a composer for harmonica music. Park almost majored in composition in one school had it not been for another school which announced that they accept any applicants of string and wind instruments. Even though majoring in the harmonica was unheard of and unprecedented, his skill allowed Park to become the first one. Park proved his skill by collecting about 10 prizes from various contests. The most memorable one of all was the pivotal contest in Japan and some others include the Asian Pacific Harmonica Contest held in China, in which Park got the first prize in three different sections and the world’s harmonica contest in Germany. Park likes to perform his own songs in the contest because he wants to express himself through the song he composed, which he believes could best convey his color and feeling. The song he feels the strongest attachment is called ‘Run Again,’ which Park composed after his mother passed away. Park was going through a great emotional slump and could not prepare for the contest. However, he suddenly encouraged himself and brushed off the dust. This song won him a grand prize! A clip of Park's performance For myself, and for the harmonica “If I have to choose one thing to do for the rest of my life, I thought it would be the harmonica because it’s what makes me happy.” The instrument is charming to Park in its smoothness in playing. “Just with the breaths I’m taking right now, the harmonica can be played. Unlike other instruments where you have to use energy or some power, the harmonica can be played very naturally.” This is what enables Park to express and convey his emotions through his songs, as the sound comes from his natural breaths. “There is one thing I want to change about the instrument. It is the fixed idea people normally have with the harmonica. Unless they see me performing, people tend to underestimate the sound the instrument can produce. I want to change such a simple understanding about the harmonica by becoming a better player who can produce greater music.” Just as Park wanted to study music composition to compose songs for the harmonica, he wanted to study orchestra because he wants to become a better harmonica player. He was seeking further studies above composition that would guide him to enhance his skills as a player and came across the idea of studying orchestra conducting. After studying conducting at Hanyang with his professor, Park became more ambitious to carry on his studying and move on to the Doctor’s degree. He not only thinks his studying will ultimately help him to become a better player but also found another goal for himself. “I wish to be an orchestra conductor who can also participate in the performance,” envisioned Park. "I will always have fun playing the harmonica and be happy with my performance." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-01 14

[Student]Monopolizing the First Place

With the slogan ‘The Engine of Korea,’ Hanyang University (HYU) has been one of the main forces in Korea for technology and engineering domains. Having high recognition of its engineering department and other fields of technology, Hanyang has been cultivating numerous outstanding students who have the potential of becoming the future leader of the fields. In this year’s Technique Examination where five out of about 250 people are selected, four Hanyangians proudly returned with the glorious news of occupying four of the five winners’ places. News H introduces two of the four Hanyangians this week: Jeon Ui-geon (Architectural Engineering, ’12) and Cho Won-dam (Chemical Engineering, 4th year). Hard work pays off, eventually Five out of 250 sure is a fierce competition with a ruthless passing ratio. Jeon prepared for the test for almost four years and Cho for an year, the rough time of which surely paid off. When asked what is the secret of winning the competition, Jeon and Cho both gave humble yet determined answers. “I think it’s all about setting the right direction. I always tried to have the best mindset of a diligent student. No matter what I was doing or where I was, I always had my mind on the materials I was studying. By wholly fixating your mind to studying, you can draw the most out of this simple method. I even dreamed of studying in my sleep. Additionally, I relieved my stress by swimming, which helps you to clear your body and mind,” said Jeon. “For me, the reason I was able to pass the test despite the lack of time in the middle of my school semester was because I put focus on the sample questions when I was studying. By analytically studying the sample questions and figuring out the main scope of the test questions, I think I was able to efficiently prepare for the test and obtain the best result,” revealed Cho. Both Jeon and Cho were in Examination Class in Hayang, where they were funded with dormitory, studying facilities and meals. They both joined study groups to find people whom they can study with and to exchange help. They took mock tests together as a group and shared their knowledge, which turned out to be a great studying method. Both of them showed great appreciation to the group members as they were in the similar situation, which means their circumstances and emotions were highly relatable to each other. The examination is largely divided into four stages, which are carried out over five days. This year’s was Jeon’s fourth and the last test, for which he exceptionally did not have a good feeling for. “To be honest, I thought I’d pass the test every year because I had a good feeling. But this year, I had several ominous happenings such as a cockroach climbing onto my toe or breaking my glasses on the first test day, which never happened in three years. However, to overcome the bad feelings, I screamed ‘a crisis is an opportunity!’ on my scooter,” chuckled Jeon. The day before the final test, in Jeon’s dream, countless shooting stars poured onto his head, which gave him hope. In Cho’s case, once again, it depended on her perspective. “I doubted myself at first because I was so anxious. However, I regarded the test as just another test from my school, which I believe helped me to do better unconsciously. Jeon (left) and Cho (right) are two proud Hanyangians who added honor to the school. 99 percent effort, 1 percent luck Interestingly, both Jeon and Cho said that passing the examination was unexpected, not to mention receiving the top scores. They were more than glad and thankful for the result, and they confessed that they felt a little lucky. The outcome of their efforts is deeply meaningful, as their reasons for taking the test was definite. For Jeon, when he was researching for his career when he was 20 years old, he first came across the Technique Examination. Since he wanted to have a job that would greatly contribute to the interest of the public, he was convinced that he would prepare for the test in the future. On the very day he was discharged from the ROTC (Reserve Officers' Training Corps), he went straight into the Examination Class and started studying. Similarly, Cho took the test because she was inspired by his father who is a dedicated public officer who works devotedly for the country. She realized taking the test would lead her to the most desired path that accorded with her values. There were hard times, as their journey was not an easy task. Jeon felt considerable burden as he doubted himself after failing from his first try. He confessed that overcoming that fear was the hardest thing as nothing was guaranteed for sure. For Cho, who had to attend her first semester’s courses, balancing and managing her studying for both her classes and the Technique Examination was not easy. Due to their relatedness in the contents, she was able to handle both of them at the same time. Now that they have passed the first door toward their dream, their goals have been laid ahead. Jeon wants to be a green architecturer who is well-recognized by his peers. He wants to contribute to Korea’s well-being at large, which is why he decided to take the Technique Examination at the first place. On the other hand, Cho wants to contribute to Korea’s energy field. Since Korea does not produce natural resources, she wants to contribute to stabilization of the country by excluding any turbulence caused by energy shortage. "Don't feel too disappointed and never give up!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-01 08

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Big Data and the Key to Handling Them

In the society where social networking is becoming more and more inseparable from people, an ever-increasing number of users are getting involved. As a consequence, the ocean of big data in corresponding area is expanding its capacity, and there has been a need to efficiently analyze and organize the data. In his Big Data Science Laboratory, Kim Sang-wook (Department of Computer Science) has been continuously researching the topic. In his recent paper “High-performance graph data processing on a single machine,” Kim has proposed a method to increase the performance of data processing and to efficiently arrange the mass of data. A graph or a network is a complex arrangement of nods and edges, which are the components of an online world such as its users and webpages and the relationships they have, respectively. In a social network, for example, each user will be labeled as a nod and the relationships that users have with other users or webpages will be marked as edges. “Where could this graph be used? Numerous types of data could be modeled in the form of this graph. For example, Facebook users and their friends, bloggers and their neighbors, and the recommender system of search engines such as Youtube, Amazon and more are all related to the graph of nods and edges.” Depending on who views what how many times or which page receives the most views, weights could be added onto the edge between the user and the page, zooming out of which will form a complex web of a graph. Big data is usually calculated in a matrix, the process which is made more efficient by Kim. (Photo courtesy of Kim) How Kim made the graph data processing more efficient is by creating three constructive approaches. First, he made matrix multiplication of data simpler and easier by balancing the load over each thread blocks of the matrix. When there is a poor balancing of load input in each row of the matrix, the multiplication process could take a long time and the performance might not be excellent. With the balanced threads of the matrix, however, even distribution of workloads would resolve this problem and it would be much less time-consuming compared to the previous method. Second, Kim created a graph engine, which is a storing software that handles data in a productive manner. In order to analyze a graph, the data must be saved in a disc first. In doing so, the tool that helps the disc to save the data more efficiently is the graph engine, which Kim proposed in his paper. “The strength of our laboratory is that we research on two aspects of data. By researching the performance-wise aspect of the data and also the analytical aspect, we leave no chance of missing a single detail of matter.” Thirdly, Kim introduced a placement algorithm that could simplify the arrangement of nods in a graph engine. Previously, when a graph undergoes a process of analysis in a graph engine, the data was put in the exact same order as it entered. Clusters of irrelevant nods could cause a delay in the data processing, which Kim solved by discovering that by sorting the nods of similar traits together, the overall performance of graph processing could show a big difference. With the same data, different outcomes could be derived by finding out the advantageous groupings of nods. With his current research of graph engine and graph modeling, he could use them as stepping stones to move onto his next research. Kim’s future research is directed toward community detection and recommender systems. With the modeled graph of data, analysis of the data could easily be made and the members of a social community with similar interests could conveniently be detected. On a similar note, a recommender system could be improved by analyzing what a user likes, clicks, views, buys, or prefers with the graph: a more accurate recommender system could be developed. With the building blocks he has worked on, Kim will be building on more as he carries on his future research. "Characteristics of the data could be figured out by analyzing the graphs." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-01 01

[Special]Hampyeong Seawater Spa and Fatigue Therapy

It is the beginning of the new year, which means it is time to make the new year’s resolution and put them into action. For a lot of people, it usually includes fixing bad habits, making better plans, and making oneself a better person than the previous year. But what about the fatigue from last year? To start the new year fresh and light, the accumulation of last year’s weariness on the shoulders must be removed first. To do so, the spa is always a good option. In Hampyeong, Jeollanam-do Province, the traditional seawater spa could make the physical fatigue evaporate along with the hot steam of the sauna. Let’s greet the new year with a relieved, rejuvenated body. The secret to becoming younger Changing into the spa attire and entering the spa house, an individual can see rows of doors of small spa rooms. Each room has a wooden rectangular bath in the middle, the size of which is perfect for three to four people to fit in. Entering the room and sitting around the bath at the center, an epiploon with foremost mugwort inside floats on the water which creates the fresh scent in the room. A moment later, the door opens and a man walks in with a shovel full of red stones saying, “it’s very hot, please be careful.” Pouring the stones into the bath, the room fills full of clouds of steam coming from the hot water. An important note is that the bath is not to be entered, as the stones in it are heated to 1300 degrees Celsius, which makes the water steaming hot. The combination of natural seawater and the broiling stones provides a miraculous remedy for fatigue. Each person is given a big and small towel, for the water is not to be directly touched; rather, the towels are to be dipped in the water and drawn out to press-squeeze the water with a round bucket, then placed over the shoulders and back for a relaxing foment effect. A beneficial tip is that wiping the face with the moderately-cooled towel will make the facial skin extremely soft and look rejuvenated because of the the foremost mugwort brewed in the natural seawater. The steamy towel soaked with natural cure for knotted muscles along with the skin care effect will refresh not only the body but also the emotion, as being in the steamy room will make sweat ooze out. The hunched back and shoulders from stress and coldness will naturally unfurl. Having the effect of both a massage and skin care, the seawater spa can kill two birds with one stone. The sulfuric stones are being heated in the fire. (Photo courtesy of Korea Tourism Organization) Stones heated to 1300 degrees Celsius are being put into the bath in the middle. (Photo courtesy of the Korea Tourism Organization) 200 years of tradition The seawater spa is a remedy which has its roots in the 19th century Joseon Dynasty era. It was a widely-used folk remedy for the well being of the body. It was recorded in the Sejong chronicles that stones with sulfuric components and some medical herbs brewed in hot seawater create a great effect for relieving neuralgia, postnatal care, arthritis, and dermatitis. Especially effective for those in their mid to late adulthood, the seawater spa has been the folk therapy for various defects. Currently located in Hampyeong in Jeollanam-do Province, the 200 years of tradition has been well preserved, and now it has become a popular cultural attraction among Koreans. The way of enjoying the spa today is the same as it had been 200 years ago; thus, visitors can experience the true tradition of the precursors. It is the new year’s winter, so why not brush off the stress and fatigue from the previous year and greet the new one with a fresh, light body and mind? After the water cools, the bath can be a foot bath and the water can be poured onto the body. (Photo courtesy of the Korea Tourism Organization) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-12 25

[General]Finding Facilities

“I know it’s somewhere, but where is it? I can’t remember!” “Let’s look at the campus map.” “Oh, that’s too much work. Forget it.” Have you and your friends ever had this conversation? For those who want to go to a café or a convenience store or need to find a place to study but cannot recall the exact location, then this article will be the perfect helper. Where is my caffein? All the cafes on campus are marked on the map. Everyone seems to grab a cup of coffee in the morning to wake themselves up from sleepy mornings. In Hanyang campus, caffeine and other delicious drinks are always there to rescue sleepy students. Starting from the subway station, café CNN is open from 8:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. during weekdays and from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. during weekends. Coming out of the Aejeemun, in Hanyang Plaza, there are four places to pick a drink from: The first is Twosome Place which opens at 7:30 in the morning and closes at 9:30 p.m. during weekdays and is open from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. during weekends. The second place is CoffeeA which is open from 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. during the semester and from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. during vacations. The third place, Coffee Bay is open from 8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. during the semester and from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. during vacations. Located on the second floor is the fourth and final place, Brow Nabi which is open from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. during the semester and from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. during vacations. Additionally, right behind Hanyang Plaza is the Student Union Building, harboring Café Grazie which is open from 8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. during weekdays and from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Saturdays (closed on Sundays and holidays). Moving a little upward to the amphitheater, Café Tiamo gives out an aromatic coffee smell. They open from 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. on weekdays during the semester, from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Saturdays during the semester, and to 6:00 p.m. on Sundays during the semester. During vacation periods, Café Tiamo is open from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on weekdays, from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Saturdays, and from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Sundays. Moving a little more upwards, in front of the Paiknam Library is another Café Tiamo available from 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m on weekdays and from 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Saturdays during the semester: during the vacation period, it is open from 8:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on weekdays and from 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Saturdays. On the outer ring of the campus, other cafes are also available: Café Dopio on the third floor of the FTC building (8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. on weekdays, from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Saturdays), Café Queue on the third floor of IT/BT Building (from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on weekdays, from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 on Saturdays), Café Namu on the first floor of Student Residence Building II (8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. on weekdays and from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. during semesters and from 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on weekdays and from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on weekends during vacations), and Café Pandorothy on B1 floor of the Humanities Building (9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.). Getting into the inner side of the campus, another café is located on the B1 floor of Haengwon Park (open from 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. on weekdays and from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on weekends during semesters and from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on weekdays during vacations), and another is located on the first floor of the Cyber University (from 8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on weekdays). The Amphitheater Cafe The College of Humanities Cafe I need a quick snack! All the yellow marks represent convenience stores. The green are PC rooms. For those who study overnight on campus, CU convenience stores are open 24 hours in front of the Paiknam Library and in the Advanced Materials and Chemical Engineering Building. Other CU stores are on the first floors of the Student Residence Building I and II, both open from 8:00 a.m. to 00:30 a.m. on weekdays, from 9:00 a.m. to 00:30 a.m. on weekends, and from 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. everyday, respectively. Another CU in Haengwon Park is open from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. on weekends and from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on weekends during semesters and from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on weekdays only during vacations. The two E-Marts on campus are located in the Humanities Building (from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. during weekdays and from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Saturdays) and in the amphitheater (from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. on weekdays and from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on weekends). The only Seven-Eleven is on the second floor of the Cyber University II (from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., Monday thru Saturday). On the fourth floor of the Olympic Gymnasium, there is a small store open from 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. on weekdays during semesters only. Lastly, in the subway station, IGa Mart is open from 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. on weekdays and from 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Saturdays. The Amphitheater Convenience Store Search and type PC rooms that students can freely use are available throughout the campus: beginning on the second floor of the IT/BT Building (from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on weekdays), in the Business Building, B2 floor (from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. from Monday to Friday), in the Economics and Finance Building, third floor (from 9:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.), in the Engineering Building I and II, third and fourth floors, in the Natural Sciences Building, first floor (from 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.), in the College of Education, second floor (from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. on weekdays), in the Humanities Building, first floor (from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.), in the College of Social Sciences, second floor (from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.), in the College of Human Ecology, fourth floor (from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. with an hour clear-out time at noon), in the College of Policy Science, first floor (from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. during semesters and from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. during vacations), in the Music Hall II, second floor (from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on weekdays during semesters and from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on weekdays during vacations), and finally, in the Law Building III, first floor (from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on weekdays, from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. during semesters, and from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on weekdays during vacations). The College of Humanities PC room Work, work, work Fitness centers and study halls are marked in blue and red, respectively. Meals and coffee are important but so is exercising. Here is the list of fitness centers on campus: (1) Student Union Building’s Health and Sweat (from 6:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. on weekdays and from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Saturdays), (2) Olympic Gymnasium (from 3:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on weekdays only, only available when the weight training class is not in session), (3) Haengwon Park, (4) Student Residence Hall V (from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. everyday, for dormitory residents only), (5) Student Residence Hall II (from 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. everyday for dormitory residents only). In addition, the basketball court next to Haengwon Park is open to everyone, while the neighboring clayed tennis court is only for staff. The grass court may be used by students with a reservation (available from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. for two hours per person). Health and Sweat in the Student Union Building. Health and Sweat Last but not least Study halls are what most students should be interested in the most. There are study halls here and there, around every corner in Hanyang campus. Starting with the International Building, the IT/BT Building, the Natural Sciences Building, the Medicine Building (for the department students only), the Medicine Building II, the Engineering Building I, and the Human Ecology Building, there are many more to visit. In the Policy Science Building, the Business Building, and the Economics and Finance Building (during exam weeks only), the study halls are open 24 hours. In the College of Education, the study hall opens early in the morning until midnight (7:15 a.m. to 00:00). In the College of Social Sciences, the study hall is open from 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Lastly, in the Humanities Building, the running hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Study room in the Humanities Building Study hall in the Humanities Building. Study hall in the College of Social Sciences A cup of coffee in the morning, quick snacks in between classes, the PC room in the afternoon for assignments, the fitness center in the evenings for health, and the study hall at night for studying are all important parts of a student's life here on campus. Stay convenient and academic! Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun Design by Cho Eun-bi

2017-12 18

[Student]Strong Inside and Out

A possessor of a doctor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering, a violinist, and an air force pilot officer are three titles that seem distantly irrelevant, as they do not overlap in their boundaries, and, perhaps, due to the awareness that each title takes a strenuously long time to achieve. Surprisingly, as it turns out, they could all belong to a single person who has passion and definite goals for the future. Youn Sung-hee (Mechanical Engineering Integrated Masters/Doctoral program, ’17) is a recently commissioned pilot officer from the Republic of Korea Air Force who obtained her Integrated Masters/Doctoral degree from Hanyang University. Youn shared her compelling story with News H this week. These pictures allow a brief glimpse into Youn's achievement. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Pivotal encounter Up until when she was a first grader in high school, Youn specialized in violin. She has numerous experience performing with a music band and also in solo performance, originally having planned to enter the school of music. When asked what has suddenly inspired her to get interested in mechanical engineering in the middle of majoring in violin, Youn answered in a convincing voice: “I was in the class room one day and heard a loud noise from a helicopter that was distractingly loud. I was triggered to think of ways to reduce the noise pollution coming from the helicopters, then I decided that I would study mechanical engineering to get expert knowledge to better address the problem.” This turning point in her youth resulted in who she is today. She started to catch up with science and math in high school in preparation to study mechanics later. She received her bachelor’s degree in three years, majoring in Physics. Afterwards, she entered the Hanyang Graduate School of Mechanical Engineering and obtained her masters/doctoral degree, further nourishing her dream of becoming a researcher of weapon systems. “As a female, I never even thought of becoming a military officer. I was hoping to become a researcher in the Agency for Defense Development or the Hanwha Corporation of Explosives, as I dreamed of contributing to the advancement of Korea’s National Army and its weapons.” It seems that the most powerful fuel that motivated her to devote her time and effort in studying the field of mechanical engineering and to become a military officer is her patriotism. While Youn was studying in Hanyang, she was involved in a project with the Agency for Defense Development. Meanwhile, she encountered another turning point. She came to realize that it is a soldier, not a civilian researcher who holds the key to diagnosing what the military truly needs. This led Youn to conclude that she must touch and observe the weapons herself in order to find out what and how to improve the current system. Finally, and most importantly, Youn visited The Korea Institute of Military Science and Technology, where she met an air force lieutenant-colonel active in duty by chance. He offered to enlist her in the army and conduct her research after hearing Youn’s plans full of passion and patriotism. After a ponderous deliberation, Youn was convinced that she would do so. “I am very satisfied with how things are going in my life, and I am ready for what awaits me.” Youn has gone through 12 weeks of military training. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Youn playing the violin: Youn is still an active violinist as she is the Head of the Orchestra at Chung-ang University and the Amateur Orchestra Union and occasionally performs solo. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Spreading the wings of a dream Of the 310 officers that were commissioned alongside Youn, 16 were female, and Youn was one of them. She confessed that the 12 weeks of training were dreadful, as the training requires not only strong physical stamina but also mental volition. “It is true that the training was hard to endure as a female,” chuckled Youn, “however, I endured the hardship with a strong mindset. Plus, my stamina wasn’t that bad to begin with.” Believing in the famous phrase that a ‘citizen’s strength is national strength,’ she always exercised in her spare time when she was in graduate school. Although no strength is ever enough to endure the harsh training in the army, Youn’s relentless passion and dedication seem to have paved the way for her. “Of course, there are a lot of fun episodes to talk about. Secretly munching on the snacks hidden by the soldiers of the previous regime and getting caught looking at a playful companion painting the camouflage cream silly and more is one such. There are many little stories that make me smile.” When Youn was studying in graduate school, she published a number of excellent papers. Two of them have been registered in the Science Citation Index, and one of which owns a patent for an optical system, which is related to protecting an aircraft from an enemy’s laser attack. Her research primarily dealt with the analysis of damage from a large output of laser. In other words, by analyzing how the damage is done to an air craft from a laser attack, the technology to prevent serious damage and protect the air craft can be invented. Youn is planning to continue her study because she values not only hands-on experience but also the academic background. “I am going to go on with my research studies to not lose touch with them!” In this upcoming January, after the rest from basic education and training, Youn is entering the Air Force Logistics Command Aviation Technology Research Institute and getting down to her research. “Energizing Korea’s dignity is my life goal. I believe if Korea becomes stronger through solid infrastructure in terms of national defence, the country’s respectability could rise after which diplomacy and the tension from foreign relations could ease and our people could feel relieved. I am determined that it is my duty and responsibility to protect the people and the country. I am willing to devote my life into what I will be given with,” remarked Youn, heartfully. As an aviation technology researcher, an air force officer, and a violinist, Youn will always follow her heart. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr