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2020-06 01 Important News

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Standing at the Center of Cutting-Edge Technology

Although there have been notable advances in the study of natural science, research related to high pressure has not been active in Korea due to the lack of groundwork technology. Professor Kim Jaeyong (Department of Physics) is opening up the route to high pressure research through the HYU-HPSTAR-CIS High Pressure Research Center, the hub of collaboration between the world-class institutes. Professor Kim Jaeyong (Department of Physics) is paving the way for high pressure research in Korea. The HYU-HPSTAR-CIS High Pressure Research Center was established in 2016 with support from The Ministry of Science and ICT. The research center is in a collaborative relationship with the Carnegie Institution for Science (CIS) of the United States and the Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR) of China. The three institutes are consistently sharing their research outcomes by holding joint symposiums and reinforcing researcher exchanges. Kim explained the collaboration as “a successful case of acquiring advanced technologies by bringing in world-class institutes,” referring to the research spirit of the center as “Moon Ik-jeom spirit.” Moon is a historical figure who brought cottonseed from China into Korea, allowing the country to produce and distribute cotton to citizens. Just as Moon did in the past, Kim attained three diamond anvil cells, high pressure devices that enable the compression of a small piece of material with extreme pressure, from HPSTAR in 2016. Within a short period, Kim succeeded in producing a unique version of the cell. The center’s main focus is on hydrogen energy storage. The have recently reported successful results in the reversible storage of hydrogen energy. By imposing high pressure in Ti-Zr-Ni Quasicrystals, the research team was able to keep 4.2 wt of hydrogen at room temperature. Kim hopes that the results will contribute to the commercialization of hydrogen-powered cars. Kim hopes to contribute to the commercialization of hydrogen-powered cars with his recent research. Kim has demonstrated his will to help position the HYU-HPSTAR-CIS High Pressure Research Center as the hub of high pressure research. Kim also encouraged more students to participate in the research. “Our university has sufficient human resources, research conditions, and support systems to conduct the research,” said the professor. “I hope the students can feel the sense of thrill that comes from standing at the center of cutting-edge technology.” Oh Kyu-jin alex684@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-05 04 Important News

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] From Seawater to Fresh Water

Droughts and water shortages are serious global threats. However, many technical developments are in progress to resolve these problems, and one of them is desalination. Desalination is the process of separating the salt in seawater from the water in order to get usable fresh water. However, the currently available technologies have the problem of sustainability, for they require fossil fuel and costly factories to be constructed. To suggest an alternative, Professor Kwak Rho-kyun (Department of Mechanical Engineering) is researching electro-membrane desalination. Professor Kwak Rho-kyun (Department of Mechanical Engineering) has been working on the topic of electro-membrane desalination for 10 years. Electro-membrane desalination uses the division of positive ion and negative ion when salt dissolves in water. The positive and negative ions are drawn to each pole when voltage is applied. Intersecting the membrane that makes each ion between electrodes pass through, called the exchange membrane of positive and negative ions, salt ions can be collected and removed. What is left is fresh water with the saline ions removed. Kwak has been working on the topic for 10 years, since he was a doctoral student. He said he first began his research inspired by the idea from his Ph.D. advisor that the unusual migration phenomenon of biomaterials such as DNA and ions would also occur in the electric membrane desalination system. His first goal was building a system of electro-membrane desalination to check whether the migration of biomaterials such as DNA and ions appear in the system of electro-membrane desalination, and visualizing the migration of the ions inside. Based on the visualization research, Kwak studied various subjects such as improving the efficiency of existing desalination devices and of treating the produced water. Kwak expressed special gratitude toward his graduate students who have helped him throughout the research process. Kwak said the significance of the study lies in that it developed a promising futuristic desalination technology, enabling Korea to become a global powerhouse to solve the future water shortage problem. Kwak’s innovative research has been highly acknowledged, introduced in journals like PRL and JOFM and others on the topics of desalination and water research. Kwak also expressed gratitude toward his graduate school students who have helped him throughout the research process. “I really want to thank my students. Their hard work was what made it possible to achieve such good research results,” said Kwak. Hwang Hee-won whitewon99@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-04 07 Important News
2017-01 16 Important News

[Student]Hanbok Beloved Worldwide

From 4th of January to 9th of January, hanbok making class was held in Human Ecology Building by Won Young. She has studied about hanbok and designing at Hanyang University (HYU) while attending Department of Clothing and Textile. The classes were held two hours everyday excluding the weekends, for four times. How it all started Won Young is Malaysian Chinese and also a Korean gyopo. While she was living in China, she says that there used to be a lot of tribes wearing different types of traditional clothes which is when she first encountered hanbok. “I have seen hanbok a lot on the television but once I came to Korea, I couldn’t see anyone wearing it in real life,” Won said. In order to make up for the discomfort of the hanbok, she started studying about life hanbok and became interested in the designs. Won (right) teaches Helene (left) how to use the sewing machine. She has created a startup team called TS (Time and Space) which consists of two people at the moment. Since she has studied in the field of fashion, Won thought of creating a brand of her own or creating a platform. Although there used to be websites where flower printings were available, it seemed to be a waste to cut out the pieces while designing her own patterns. This is how Won came up with the idea of DIY fabric in which she designs her own patterns and inserts the prints within the patterns. While attending at HYU, Won has participated in diverse programs created for international students but she felt that something was missing. “It seems like I was just looking around rather than doing something at the complete experiencing level. I think there are a lot of foreigners who would think like me,” said Won. This is how she came up with the idea of hanbok making class. Reactions towards the program A total number of fourteen students from diverse countries have participated in this program. Cho Yu-jin (faculty at Department of Clothing and Textile) and Lee Ye-jin (acquaintance of Won) have helped out with this event. Cho has helped out with the over lock while Lee has helped with the translation with the foreign students. Since the students participating in this program did not have any experiences or were not related major to fashion or designing, they had a hard time putting this together and one of them had to do all the sewing all over again from the sketch. Renu (left) and Azira (right) enjoys the program. Most of the students who have participated in the program had a similar idea in a sense that they were not aware of hanbok and how it could be utilized in daily life as well. Hwang An-ki (Media Communication, 2nd yr) said, “I was not well aware of Hanbok in the first place but as I was making it, it came to me as a beautiful traditional clothing.” Since foreign students who do not return to their home countries have not much to experience, they all claim that it has been a great experience for them. “I think it’s quite interesting that some people still wear traditional clothes since we don’t have them in Denmark. I think hanbok is very beautiful costume,” claimed Helene (Korean Studies, Master’s program). Although it has been a short period of time, all the students were able to finish their hanboks. After the session has finished, participants have matched their casual clothes along with hanbok and had photo session afterwards. “Through making the hanbok, foreign students would have been able to have the sense of achievement and feel the traditional culture of Korean costume. Also, by being able to have felt a new type of experience of making clothes, some people would have found a new hobby as well,” added Won. The students who have participated will keep in contact with each other and exchange information on hanbok flea markets or Korean culture experiences. Through this program, foreign students now understand Korean culture a little more. Since it has been a greatly developed program where it has been a talent donation of Won, students from diverse countries were able to experience the beauty of hanbok. Won hopes that she could carry out more programs related to hanbok in the future as well and provide lessons as part of the Korean wave towards foreigners. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Kim Sang-yeon Photo by Moon Hana