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2016-11 28 Important News

[Alumni]Ko Kang-min, the Leader of Mabangzen

The history of theatrical plays traces back to Ancient Greece. Since then, different forms of entertainment emerged. From private films to musicals, the demand for performance arts have increased rapidly in the modern era, overpassing a number of theatrical plays. Yet, there is work to retrieve from the golden age of plays, and Ko Kang-min (Business and Administration ’01, ERICA Campus) is one individual who supports it as the CEO and producer of the theater company, Mabangzen. It is also known as a 'playfactory' where original plays are created from scratch in order to promote the theatrical plays of Korea. For Shakespeare, the world was a stage, and all the men and women were actors. For Ko, the stage is his life, bringing life to Korean theatrical plays. Ko developed the company successfully based on his experiences. Q1. Can you tell us more about Mabangzen and its origin? Ko: "Mabangzen is a company that produces and performs plays for the public. Our plays are all original plays where we develop everything, from the script to the stage setting, from the beginning to the end. The company was first established in 2005 by the play director, Ko Sung-wong. And it was named after the Korean traditional game Mabangzen, similar to Sudoku, in hopes of promoting the importance of teamwork. Like a game of Mabangzen where all the numbers added on each side must equal in sum, when all the members of the team cooperate to put together a play, the results will follow. Today, there are 46 members in the company including actors, producers, and directors." Q2. What is your role in the theater company? What do you like about your work? Ko: “Currently, I work as the CEO and producer in the company. I like to say that I am a supporter who manages the financial aspects, renting theaters, and finding sponsors, as well as practical aspects such as making the final call of which play to perform. I totally love my job here because I get to interact with the actors and the staff which reminds me of the days when I was just like them. I came to Mabangzen in 2010 after Ko Sung-wong convinced me to collaborate with him in the small theater company. It was a tough decision but when I believed that the goals we had as playwrights matched - forming a systemic method to generate quality plays - I agreed to it. I was also a big fan of Ko Sung-wong’s theatrical pieces. I think we work very well together.” Mabangzen produces original plays based on Korean culture. (Photo courtesy of Mabangzen) Q3. Can you tell us about the company’s work? Ko: “The most well-known piece of our company is called 'Hongdo', a play first introduced to the Korean public in 1936. It is a melodrama and a tragedy. The basic synopsis is about a woman, Hongdo, who is a gisaeng, or Korean geisha, who lives in a melancholic life after a heartbreaking incident with a man. This piece was very popular back in the mid-21st century; however, the writer of the play defected to North Korea which resulted in the public to shut off interest. We have performed this play since 2014 in major venues like the Seoul Arts Center and the Coex Arts Hall, as well as on the international stage in places such as the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Belarus, Turkey, and Chile.” Q4. You have also acted onstage. When did you first get involved in theater arts? Ko: “Yes. I have experience on stage as an actor as well. I don’t recall the exact year, but when I was in high school, I saw a poster that recruited members for the theatrical play club. I took part in it. It was a small-scale play but from that moment on, I developed my passion for plays. I desired to major in theater and film at university, but my father, who was an officer in the military, was strongly against it. Even though I studied business at Hanyang University (HYU), as soon as I entered HYU, I went straight to the theater club to take part. Then, I began to get involved in all-round plays by acting onstage, building stages, writing scripts, and producing performances. I think the lengthy experiences that I had in theater clubs helped me to acquire the know-how to become a CEO and producer.” Q5. When was the toughest time of your life as a producer? Ko: “I think the toughest time was definitely when we went overseas to perform 'Hongdo'. Out of all the international performances, I remember the first one, in China, as the one that I consider unforgettable. It was the first time our crew went abroad for performance, which was why the preparation process, which depended entirely on my abilities, was a burden. From getting visas to controlling the excessive exhilaration of young members, I even remember crying one night in the hotel bed! Aside from this trip, though, the job as a producer is always hard-hitting. The company has to receive financial support from external sponsors, and the concern regarding the successes and failures of each plays are something I must endure every day.” A scene from 'Hongdo', one of the masterpieces of Ko's production. (Photo courtesy of Mabangzen) Q6. Adversely, when was the most memorable moment? Ko: “I feel like I've focused too much on the depressing parts, but there is a reason why I still love my job and theatrical plays. Generally, after the end of each performance, I sit at the back of the room and watch the faces of the audience as they walk out of the venue. When I see their faces explicitly showing awes, I am the happiest person alive then. I didn't foresee the success of our plays internationally. Traditional plays are about Korea and we, the members of Mabangzen, are the bridge that links the our culture and a foreign one. It is arduous, but it brings me joy and great memories.” Q7. What makes theater arts special? Why do you think the public should enjoy watching theatrical plays? Ko: “For me, I loved watching plays because it was like taking a break from mundane life as a student. I used to watch about few hundred plays back in the old days. The funny thing is that I recently watched a blockbuster film at a cinema after years of not watching movies. Honestly, I was shocked to see the spectacular scenes and action that captivated most movie-watchers. That’s when I understood why people go crazy about these films. Even so, plays are not movies or musicals. It has its own 'something' to it. Even for me, it's extremely difficult to say which factors make plays valuable. All I can say is that there is that 'something' that only plays can portray and deliver to the audience. And our job is to continue to seek out the exclusive style of our plays, to let the audience know what plays are all about.” Q8. What are your goals for the future? Ko: “Practically, I want to enhance the quality of plays by improving the conditions of our company members. I am planning on building a villa near Seoul to create an effective practicing space for the entire crew. Members run under tight schedule and to practice in a typical training space requires immense amounts of energy but no time. I think establishing a system like camp training will increase efficiency and teamwork among the members. Other than that, I hope to produce plays that many will enjoy watching." Q9. Any last comments for the readers? Ko: “To be honest, I wasn't a bookish student when I was in college. Even though I majored in business, I attended more of the general classes that included literature and theater arts. Still, I stood strong to my passion and to what I wanted at the time, which naturally led me to where I am today. Right now, I don't know for sure how I will run this company in the next few years. It’s not like I don't have a plan, but usually, nothing happens according to plan. So I think it's important to enjoy the moment you have now and to have full faith in the work you do. We must let our lives flow just like the flow of dialogues in a play.” Under the leadership of Ko, Mabangzen is preparing for a new play. Park Min-young manutdmin@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2016-11 27 Important News

[Alumni]Yoo Seul-gi's Vocal Music and Career

Yoo Seul-gi of the Department of Vocal Music (’10), whose life has been associated with music since the age of four, embarked on his journey of pursuing his career as a vocal singer when he was in middle school. Recently televised through an audition program called Phantom Singer, Yoo drew public attention with his singing abilities and his record- graduating Hanyang University as valedictorian and being the vocal trainer of the famous singer Yoon Min-soo after graduating. The alumnus is looking forward to making vocal music more popular and approachable, as well as becoming a renowned vocal singer himself. Yoo on Phantom Singer After finishing his military service in 2015, Yoo was considering of going abroad for further studies on vocal singing. However, circumstances were not too favorable for him to do so, despite his avidity and eagerness. An alternative option that provided Yoo with what he wanted was the audition program Phantom Singer, which gave him an opportunity to let the public hear his voice. While on air, he performed the music titled ‘Granada’, through which he gave a message: since this song possesses both smooth and tough sensations, Yoo wanted to demonstrate that he is able to manifest both facets at the same time. “It is hard for a soft person to look strong and vice versa. By performing this music, I wanted to show that I have my own unique feature, a mixture of both aspects,” remarked Yoo. ▲ Yoo performing 'Granada' on Phantom Singer “Among a big group of voices, it is essential for me to sort out my own voice, knowing what my best part is,” explained Yoo. In this context, Yoo regards himself as his own rival, distinguishing his voice from the others’. Winning to the final round of the audition, Yoo is determined to make each stage memorable and impressive to the audience, not focusing too much on the outcome. When Yoo was a freshman, he did not think he had a talent for singing. However, on his very first vocal test, he was evaluated as the best student among his peers. It was from that moment that Yoo pushed himself to work harder and do his best, which he did by practicing until late at night every day throughout the six years of his university life. “It is undeniable that people with innate abilities have different starting points and more advantages. Yet I strongly believe that if one has the passion that supports that confidence, they can acquire such a talent,” said Yoo. "While I was at university, I was taught by Professor Kho Sung-hyun, one of the most eminent baritone singers of Korea. I could say that there are traces of his teachings in my singing,” he added. Coaching the famous singer Yoon Min-soo on vocalization is also Yoo's notable task. He became the vocal trainer of Yoon through an acquaint composer who offered Yoo the place. Yoon had never received vocal training before but he insisted on getting lessons from a vocal musician, since vocal music centers on vocalization when producing sounds, signifying considerable help to a singer. “I want to make vocal music more friendly to the public. Compared to popular music, vocal music may feel distant from people, being somewhat unfamiliar to them. Through television programs like Phantom Singer, I hope vocal music draws more attention and becomes more receptive,” noted Yoo. Yoo Seul-gi, the alumnus of 2010, Department of Vocal Music (Photo courtesy of Yoo Seul-gi) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-11 25
2016-11 21 Important News

[Alumni]Creativity Never Sleeps

In a capitalistic society, commercials play a great influence on people’s consumption. Within a film that lasts about 30 to 60 seconds, a commercial gives a certain image to a product or a service. How to make one is a quite complex task and News H asked Kim Jeong-hoon (Theater & Film ‘87), commercial director and the representative of the production group, THE HAPPY about more details. 30 Years Career Devoted to Commercial Making Kim's interest in movies from his years of middle school grew large enough to apply to the Department of Theater & Film of Hanyang University (HYU). Kim mentioned how he was eagle to study movies more in depth. As it was his major, Kim was more associated with activities related to plays and movies than advertising. “I was deeply into plays. During my years at the university. I experienced various roles in plays, from acting, planning, to directing,” said Kim. ▲ Kim is currently the representative of the production company, THE HAPPY. As he was very much devoted to studying movies and plays, his life was irrelevant to commercials until he graduated. “I was even planning to apply to foreign university to study further about the field but little shortage of scores needed was bugging me at the time,” said Kim. It was rather a radical choice for Kim to apply for a producer (PD) position at a commercial agency at his 4th year, when he had to make a decision about his future. Although it was highly competitive to take the postion as it was desired by a lot of the advertisement majors, Kim proudly passed 6 exams and interviews to make a first step in his commercial career. “I think I was able to adjust well as producing commercials share common essence with making movies and plays. They both require ‘creativity’. The name of the two work is different, but people in both fields are ultimately trying to ‘create’ something in ways that is out of the box,” explained Kim. Starting from the PD, Kim’s career steadily went on the rise as he later become a major directors in two different commercial agencies. Finally at 1996, Kim decided to move out from his last company and to establish his own production company, THE HAPPY, which remarked its peak in his 30 years career. Magic through Logic The company is composed of Kim, as a representative director, and several employees, which is smaller than some of the big agencies. “I wanted my work environment to be flexible and free by keeping it small. That is why I decided to make my own company. I, myself do work when I am willing to, so I wanted to provide free and comfortable working environment for my employess as well," said Kim. While the company’s working environment is free and flexible, it does not mean the job is without any stress. Kim said that his daily cycle is mainly composed of brainstorming. “To me, advertisement is like 24 hours. Every day, every moment, I think about advertisement. How to make it and to direct it. I even did a presentation in front of advertisers in my sleep. The psychiatrist I visited 5 years ago explained to me that my light sleep shows how stressful I can be before important meetings,” said Kim. ▲ The photo on the left (front row), is the most recent ad 'Hot Hot' which was a great hit. On its left was the ad that featured public campaign. The bottom two ads were among the most popular ones as well, which popularized tropical fruit drinks (right) to kids soda drinks (left). (Photo courtesy of THE HAPPY production) Even though being a commercial director can be one of the stressful jobs in the world, Kim said he is still enjoying his job as it is adventurous. “To me, there is no one commercial to consider at a certain period. When it is the busiest time of the month, I even had to plan 19 ads simultaneously,” said Kim. There are various commercials Kim have directed. It ranges from food, drinks to public campaigns. Kim said one of the key priority to consider when he is directing, is perfect planning. “I try hard not to make any exceptions when I am filming. When filming the scene with actors and other staffs, I consider it a process of ‘editing’. I draw all the scenes in my head and follow it exactly,” said Kim. “Every scenes should be made with logic, it is made due to significant reason agreed by the whole team beforehand.” In the New Era of Advertisement There were several turning points in his 30 years career but Kim said one of the most important time is now. “A lot of the advertisement nowadays is changing its form into mobile ads, which spreads quicker. As the change is quite vast, a lot of the domestic commercial directors tend to work with foreign companies because of the lack of the number of conventional ads they can work on,” explained Kim. Kim said it is important to jump on the new bandwagon to survive in the field. “Old days were good, but I think change is what makes one improve oneself.” “Moreover, I could be one of the oldest among commercial directors. There are a lot of directors quitting because of their age, but I don’t think creativity is something that is confined to one’s age,” said Kim. “Creativity never sleeps, one of my goal is film in the day of my 60th birthday party.” ▲ Kim's passion toward advertisement will be continued. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2016-11 20

[Alumni]Park Myung-hoon, the Chief Composer of Korean Symphony Orchestra

The Korean Symphony Orchestra is one of the most renowned orchestra in the country with a history of about 30 years. Many talented musicians have been a member of it to represent Korean classical and modern music. A position in the Orchestra is highly coveted by young musicians. Last month in October, Park Myung-hoon (Department of Composition ‘05) has been appointed as chief composer in the Korean Symphony Orchestra (hereafter “the Orchestra”). As his first, the gifted composer will receive an honor of creating a song that will be played by the Orchestra between 2018 and 2019. It is truly a point of pride for Hanyang University (HYU), especially for the college of music and News H interviewed Park to celebrate the great achievement. Q1. How do you feel about being appointed as the chief composer in the Orchestra? Park: “In various Korean orchestras, the system of having a chief composer did not exist until, recently, like 2-3 years ago. It has been difficult for orchestras to fully assign a chief composer in terms of financial and management issues. So, it is an honor for me because there are not many chances to create a song on my own with no holds barred. I think it is a wonderful opportunity in my career and I am very happy about being appointed as the chief composer.” Q2. Can you tell the readers about your specific role as the chief composer? Park: “It is quite simple to be frank because all I have to do is compose a song for the Orchestra to play. It is like a contract where the symphony gives me about one year to complete a song and the orchestra must play the song however I want it to be played. I was given about 30 minutes of time; therefore, my goal would be to concentrate on producing two songs, one song being about 15 minutes, that the Orchestra can perform on stage.” Q3. Are you currently in process of creating the music for the Orchestra? What kind of music do you compose? Park: “I usually compose contemporary music, which is a trend of classical music that started in the early 20th century and continues to this day. It is different from classical music because it adds on the elements of modern music into it. For the Orchestra, I have only mapped out the basic sketch of the two songs. For now, I want the first song to be a piano concerto, music of a piano solo. Other than that, I am still in progress of basic outlining. I have a year given to me, but it is not a long time to create a perfect piece of music, so I need to work harder to complete the song.” ▲ Park has won numerous awards in music composition contests. (Photo courtesy of Park) Q4. We know that you also work as a professor at HYU, what are other works that you do outside of being the chief composer? Park: “Yes. Currently, I give teach “Composition Workshop” at HYU. The lecture is for the seniors and it is mainly about how contemporary music is composed and played in Europe and analyzing why some of that music are not played in Korea. I enjoy teaching the students because I believe that supporting young talented musicians is important in booming up the success of Korean modern music. I also serve as the Artistic Director and Composer in the Ensemble Eins which I have established to promote new contemporary music and give other musicians opportunities to play music in an ensemble. Even though I am extremely busy due to these various work positions, I still enjoy taking part in marvelous groups as a chief composer, director, and professor.” Q5. Can you tell the readers about how your music career began? Park: “I was first involved in music when I was four years old. Like other Koreans of that age, I went to piano school as well as art school. My father was an artist and he wanted me to pursue music because he didn’t want me to go through the difficulties as an artist. While I was playing piano, my interest was more into how the song was made so, I gained composing experiences by participating in music competitions and concours.” Q6. What was it like when you attended HYU? What about when you studied abroad in Germany? Park: “One thing that pops into my head right now is when my friend and I first established a college music club called the Free Composition Group (FCG). It was a club within the college of music to promote song composition and hold annual recitals for the students. We thought active experiences would help the students gain more confidence when all of us step outside the university. The club still exists to this day and it is a strange feeling to see the junior students maintained it for such a long time. After graduation, I studied in Köln, Germany for about 9 years. I really enjoyed the time there because the environment allowed me to freely develop my ability in composition. The friends and professors I have met there encouraged me to find my own color in music.” Q7. What are the most important elements in composing a song? Park: “In any form of art, including music, I think individuality is the most important element. I use the phrase, ‘making it mine,’ a lot with students because a song has innumerable value if it has the composer’s uniqueness imbedded into it. For me, my father’s paintings are my influence for composing a song. This results in a music that only I can create with my own personal experiences. Furthermore, communication is also key in developing the musicians through community connections, peer evaluations, and higher growth. This can produce a piece of work that can not only satisfy the public but also bring out the best in your individuality.” Q8. What is your goal in the future? Park: “I think utmost goal is to simply produce good music for the public to enjoy. I am completely satisfied with where I am now because I want to improve continuously. I remember one my professors in Germany describing one song as being “just you.” I think that is exactly what I want to achieve.” Q9. Do you have any last comments for the readers? Park: “I hear from my students that they are having a tough time with figuring out what to do with life. It is necessary to worry about the financial issues, but I strongly believe having too much concerns on life is not good. One cannot know what it is to work in a field without actually going into the field. Therefore, even though life is difficult and work seems hard, why not try and experience before having too much concern? It will certainly lead you to someplace that you have not expected with more experience.” Some of the songs Park have composed include: “Monta,” “Mach Kein,” and “Seeds” You may listen to his music through videos on YouTube. (←CLICK) ▲ As a chief composer, Park has a set goal ahead of him - producing good music for the public. Park Min-young minyoungpark118@gmail.com Photos by Park Min-young

2016-11 20 Important News

[Academics]Institutionalization of the green certification scheme

Professor Kim Hong-bae of the Department of Urban Planning & Engineering is an expert in the field of urban planning. His paper, “A cost-benefit analysis for the institutionalization of the green certification scheme”, discusses about what would be beneficial when it comes to achieving the green certification. Green certification is the standardized certificate used to prove the suitability of Green technology and products. As for other developed countries, there has been green certifications since the 1990s following the concerns of environmental pollution. For instance, Great Britain has the BREEAM, Japan has CASBEE and United States has the LEED. These institutionalized green certificates are competing to become the world standard. Although Korea now has GBCC, it is not institutionally stabilized compared to other countries yet. Other countries provide the green certification in terms of community, rather than single building itself while Korea is on its way to broadening its spectrum towards giving communities the green certification. ▲ Kim explains about the green certification What is so special about Kim’s paper was that it has provided a deep insight into whether green certification was something that really provides people with benefits in life or not. Through the cost benefit analysis, he has provided the guidelines to how the system would be generally constructed. By providing low carbonizing 45 sectors ranging from industry to policies, Kim has divided the qualification standard and it has its meanings in that social costs and benefits are derived. Most of the standards are very straightforward. However, there are some of the ambiguous points to be digitized into measurements which include pride or self-esteem. Most of the measurements are easier to make for instance, the market value of the house that individuals live in. However, it is hard to show the pride in terms of numerical values to be seen. This is where the contingent valuation method (CVM) comes into action. This explains the “willingness to pay” and digitizes the inherent value inside individuals. ▲ Kim expresses that energy should be saved Some of the studies that Kim is engaged in currently is related to energy harvesting. By recycling the energy wasted into creating a new source of energy, it has its huge meanings. Also, Kim has pointed out a special point in that electric cars do not actually lower the carbon dioxide level nationally. “Although in regions where electric cars operate will show lower signs of carbon dioxide level, the regions where electricity is produced will show greater levels of carbon dioxide which means that nationally, it breaks even,” said Kim. The goal of Kim’s studies leads to one simple logic. In order to achieve low carbon, low energy comes first. The responsibility to saving energy would lead to a lower level of carbon dioxide, which is believed to be one of the worst factors that affect global warming. People need to actively engage in actions such as car sharing or even the smallest actions such as saving water, electricity and the environment as a whole. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-11 20 Important News

[Special]Wisdom in Proverbs

There are hundreds of Korean proverbs, all of which originated from the thoughts-incorporated daily lives of our ancestors, allowing us to take a glimpse of their livelihood. They teach us sympathetic lessons that are applicable in our lives even today, showing deep wisdom and keen insight embedded in our ancestors’ minds. Even though the lifestyle and circumstances changed over centuries, the proverbs inherited from our precursors are still relatable and usable at modern times, put in use of people’s everyday conversation suiting to the situation. Transcending over time, the proverbs have provided us with valuable teachings. Categories of Proverbs Proverbs are often defined as concise and accurate expressions containing wit and wisdom, often derived from ordinary people’s daily lives and experiences. They are formed from abstraction of a particular instance, in which the situation itself becomes a figure of speech that contains a specific meaning or a lesson that corresponds to the situation. According to each situation, proverbs can be largely divided into four types: critical, didactic, experimental, and jocular proverbs. Critical proverbs involve criticizing or admonishing the opponent about their behavior, pinpointing the blunder with the tone of sarcasm or scolding. An exemplary critical proverb would be “a frog forgets about its tadpole days,” meaning someone who stands at a high position belittles those at a lower position, not remembering the fact that they, too, once stood at the same position. This saying contains the teaching that no matter how well your being is, you should not look down upon the others because you are demeaning yourself in the past as well. Moreover, another critical proverb that makes you ponder about your own behavior is “a stool-stained dog rebukes a mud-stained dog.” This proverb aims to condemn those who have big faults yet tries to reproach those with minor faults, reminding them their own places. ▲ "A frog forgets about its tadpole days" Didactic proverb is the most abundant one of all, delivering a teaching as the core meaning. This type is rather instructive than admonishing, setting the truth and affirming what is right or wrong. For example, “knock on the stone bridge before crossing” is underscoring the importance of always being cautious, even with the most easy and familiar task because overlooking an easy task can result in a mistake. Adding on, “downstream can only be clear when upstream is clear” emphasizes the fact that those who set examples have a great impact on those who learns from them, meaning only when they act right will the followers learn good acts. Therefore, it is of their duty to demonstrate good deeds first. Furthermore, “a bull’s horn should be drawn at a breath” gives an advice that a task should not be procrastinated and be carried to action without further do—when a bull’s horn is drawn, heat is applied onto the horn to make the process quick and easy, at least when the heat is still effective, suggesting that the work be done when there is higher energy or will. Moreover, experimental proverbs give a prediction about a situation, based on the occurrence of a similar situation in previous and the lesson derived from it. To exemplify, “a theft brings cramps on his own feet” is a proverb that anticipates a situation, where a person feels too guilty about his own sin that he unintentionally exposes it by himself. This saying is referring to the situation in which someone who committed a bad deed flinches everytime a similar issue is mentioned and acts abnormally, eventually hinting that he is guilty for it. Also, “underneath the lamp is the darkest” predicts that the solution to a problem is not always far away, indicating that you should always be watchful in close approximates. ▲ "Underneath the lamp is the darkest" Lastly, jocular proverbs are expressions that function like similes, by using them as a comparison to a situation. “Pillaging and eating a flea’s liver” is comparable to a situation where someone who is affluent is benefiting from someone who is much underprivileged. Since a flea is an extremely small insect, taking out its liver to eat is pillaging off someone who owns very little, almost exploiting them. Additionally, “licorice in pharmacy” virtually means “an indispensable thing” due to the omnipresence of licorice in any oriental medicine stores. Thus,if something is said to be the licorice in pharmacy, it means that thing is always present in a place or situation. In short, proverbs can be used to describe a situation briefly in one expression or to make a witty comparison. Stemming from the daily lives of our ancestors, each and every proverb conveys a valuable meaning and teaching that we can easily encounter in our daily lives as well. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-11 15 Important News

[Alumni]"Nothing but Music"

Singer-songwriter Gaho, Lim Ji-sun (Department of Dance, ’09), is a singer who sings love in a calm yet very sophisticated voice. One of the rising artists in Hongdae, Lim was in fact a dancer for about 20 years in the past. She started dancing from a very young age and thought she would naturally follow the path of being a member of a dance company like a lot of her friends. For Lim, choosing to write and sing songs was more than merely switching her major but was following her belief about what was right. It required enough courage for her to do so. Lim definitely had many ups and downs in the past 5 years since she started to officially work as a singer-songwriter. Her stage name Gaho, meaning blessing of God, shows how much she hoped for the best of luck since she started to make music as a career. Delivering Love Stories in Tranquility Lim officially started her career as a singer-songwriter in 2011, two years after she graduated Hanyang University (HYU). “When I was in my 4th year, I felt much doubt about my major. I could easily foresee the ‘reality’ of becoming a dancer- that my abilities wouldn't be up to becoming a successful dancer. I wasn’t 100% sure that I could neglect that fact,” said Lim. After graduation, Lim wanted to give herself some time to ponder about her life and career. Her first obstacle came with tinnitus, an ear malfunction that made her hear ringing and buzzing sounds that only she could hear. “I was diagnosed with a sudden sensorineural hearing loss that occurred due to stress.” With a stage name Gaho, Lim is currently performing in small concert halls in Hong dae. “Despite this, I was still interested in singing and music. I was deep into indie music and was a huge fan of the Korean singer, Nell. He inspired me to sing my own story,” said Lim. Her condition deterred her from working the best she could. Lim could only rely on sounds that were louder than 120 decibels. “I had to solely depend on loud beats that was made by drums to sing and play piano along with it. After about 6 months of working as a singer, I found that I could slowly but more clearly hear sounds better. I thought it was a miracle. I remember myself crying from pleasant surprise.” Currently, she can only hear sounds with her right ear but is trying to retain the current status with constant care and medication. Step by Step Making music was just a hobby for her at first, as she had a very shallow knowledge of music and composition. Lim’s method of composition began from recording melodies of her humming and then transforming it to a score with the help of her friends who majored in music. “I knew it was a rather reckless choice for me to take as a means of living, but singing and writing songs soon became the biggest motivation and joy of my life,” said Lim. After releasing about four albums and digital singles, Lim was faced with another stumbling block. “I felt insecure about my career. I was at the end of my 20s, and I saw all my other friends getting married and settling down unlike myself. I was afraid that my career wasn’t going to be able to support my living,” said Lim. Such thoughts almost led her to make her 5th album ‘I will only cry for 4 minutes’ as her last one. “I thought that album would be the last, but I was lucky enough to find a company that was willing to support my music production.” After a contract with a music label, Lim could concentrate more on her work with less financial burden that she had had before. Lim became more confident about her music and also became more professional with sessions and bands that came along with her in her performances. 'Your Night' is her upcoming lullaby album, and 'Suddenly' was her most recent album. (Photos courtesy of Gaho) Derived From Real Experiences “A lot of my songs were written from my own experience, which recorded thoughts and feelings when I was heartbroken because of my relationship with my lover,” said Lim. As she tends to work when her emotional state is most intense, Lim mentioned she usually works with her other musician friends late at night. Among her songs that express complex emotions after breakups, there is one that is noticeably bright. “The song ‘Do you feel the same?’ was the song I wrote when I met a guy from Sweden in Korea. He invited me to Sweden with his own expense and traveling to Sweden with a person I cared a lot about was one of the most delightful moments in my life. I recorded melodies and lyrics, and made a song out it when I came back to Korea.” After Lim’s most recent album ‘Suddenly’ that was released in September, she is currently working on a new album that is to be released in December. ‘Your Night’ will be an album with four lullaby songs for adults. “I hope my songs could lead people to fall asleep well by releasing the stress they had that day,” said Lim. Also, Lim is undergoing steady vocal training to improve her singing skills and voice to become a better musician. “I know I have a lot of points to improve on, and I am willing to do so to become a musician that can impose a strong impression on people,” concluded Lim. Lim advised HYU students to have the courage to step out of their 'comfort zone' for more freedom and possibilities. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2016-11 14

[Event]Students Volunteer for Caretakers

On November 9th, a special event called 'Sipsi-ilak' was held by Sipsi-ilbab, a school volunteering organization, along with the Hanyang University Volunteer Corps (HYUVC) to provide a session where the janitors and cleaners of Hanyang University (HYU) could have a pleasant meal together and watch the Arirang concert. This was special in that this event was held during the working hours of the caretakers and students were voluntarily working in those hours on behalf of them. ▲ Caretakers are enjoying their meal (Photo courtesy of Sipsi-ilbab) How it all came together Vice chairman of Sipsi-ilbab, Park Hyun-ah (Business, Master’s program) claimed that the purpose of this event was to understand the caretakers as a part of the HYU organization and have a moment of gratitude towards them. “They are a crucial part of making the school a much cleaner and safer place. Yet not many students realize this nor do they have any interests towards them,” said Park. As for this event, 42 students have applied to work on behalf of caretakers, where they have been split into 43 school buildings to do cleaning and recycling work. Since the cleaners left only the easy tasks for students, there were not much they were required to do and 21 teams were formed into groups of two students to take care of two buildings. Prior to the event, students were educated on which buildings they would be in charge of and which tasks they were required to do. ▲ A student volunteer is cleaning the bathroom (Photo courtesy of Sipsi-ilbab) Although this event was held last year as well by HYU, this is the first time that Sipsi-ilbab has collaborated. “We were planning on this event last year as well but due to financial and time issues, this is the first time that we have participated,” said Park. Last year, there was no student volunteering participation but with the help of Sipsi-ilbab, this event has become even more special compared to last year. About 200 caretakers were able to enjoy themselves to eat meat soup prepared by HYUVC and Sipsi-ilbab. Feelings towards one another As for the student volunteering representative, Yoon Hee-sung (Business, 1st year) presented some of the things that he has learned and felt during the event. “Since we were only doing a small proportion of the tasks done by the caretakers for an hour, it did not burden us in any way. However, coming to think of them working around all over the campus on every floor, it seemed to be too much,” Yoon said. “Although it seems very reasonable that hygiene is kept to a high level, without the cleaners, it would become dirty in a matter of time. We should be thankful of them and actively participate to be of help,” Yoon added. ▲ "We should be more thankful and actively participate to be of help to other people" (Photo courtesy of Sipsi-ilbab) The caretakers of HYU were also grateful for the event as well. During an interview with two cleaners (Jeon Young-suk and Lee Seok-suk), they wanted to say a few words towards those who have worked hard to prepare this event. “This seems to be a great event. I thank the students and school who have provided us with this great opportunity,” said Jeon. “As for those students who have worked on behalf of us, we give out special thanks and we just hope that recycling is done properly by people,” Jeon added. “I have participated in the event last year and it is great to be back. Cleaning is not something that students would have experienced often and it is so nice of them to step in and do the work for us,” said Lee. They have both voiced out that as their work is for the good of many, they are happy to be working for HYU. Events like this provide a valuable lesson for many to step into other people’s shoes and think in their positions. Park said that Sipsi-ilbab will try to keep collaborating with HYU to hold this event every year. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-11 14

[Alumni]Aria Brewed with Diligence and Modesty

Luciano Pavarotti, one of the three tenors of a popular operatic singing group, and Jo Su-mi, a Grammy Award-winning South Korean soprano, are the world famous opera singers in history. These two renowned opera singers, including others such as Mirella Freni and Hong Seong-hun are the winners who received first prize in the 67-year-old Viotti Music Competition. Jo Chan-hee (Vocal Music, ‘16), along with these legendary figures of music, won first prize in the Viotti music contest held from October 21th to 29th, in Vercelli, Italy. News H met Jo Chan-hee to hear about his life and his music. ▲ Jo, winner of 67th Viotti music contest. (Photo courtesy of Jo Chan-hee) Q1. Congratulations, could you please introduce yourself to the readers? Also, tell us how you felt about your win. Right now, I feel thankful for everyone who congratulated me on winning the award. The reason for my participation of the contest was to check my ability before going abroad to study vocal music in depth. I still cannot forget the moment when my name was shown as a winner, and I feel a bit embarrassed because I was quite nervous during the contest. I could have given a better performance. Q2. How did you prepare for the contest? I did not actually prepare for the contest like preparing for a test. Rather, I always practice singing about two hours every day. My mother, who is a leader of an opera group, gives music lessons to me. Then I look for the meaning of the lyrics of the songs in Italian, German, French, and Russian. Because arias consist of lines from poems, I write the verses over and over to remember them. Memorization, feeling the beat of the music, and delivery are very important. Therefore, I read these words out loud, think a lot about the pronunciation of vowels and consonants. I also use Youtube as a reference, searching for the songs that I have to practice. Although these activities seem like a great deal, I find them very enjoyable. Q3. Could you introduce us the song you performed in the contest? In order to participate in an international music competition, you have to practice the work that is selected by the host. The song I sang is Don Giovanni by Mozart. The part I performed is an aria by the character Leporello, a servant of the womanizer Don Giovanni, who introduces his master’s various love interests. The lyrics are lewd and also humorous. Q4. Was there anything interesting aspects of the contest, and were there any difficulties while participating in the event? The interesting aspect while joining the competition was that we were asked to record videos of the city of Vercelli, and in the finale contest, the scenery that we recorded was put up as a background while we gave performances, like a film festival. The difficult thing was controlling my condition before the contest, such as adjusting to the weather. Q5. Living as an artist, and especially as an opera singer, is very honorable. However, there must be some difficulties in the life of artists. What do you think are the hardships of living as an opera singer? Seeing my professor Ko Seong-hyeon, and my parents, the life of an opera singer is very honorable. However it is also burdensome in terms of responsibility as well. An opera singer‘s body is a musical instrument in itself. So I consistently need to take care of my body and control myself. That way, I will be able to deliver happiness and sadness altogether to the audience. Q6. How did you start studying vocal music? What is the driving force that pushes you on? I’m a bit different from others because I have two sets of parents instead of one. I spent my youth with my real parents, but their situations did not permit them to educate me further. Because of those reasons, I was adopted by my step parents from my middle school 3rd year. My step parents did not have any children, so they regarded me as a gift from God. They truly cared about me and they were the ones who taught me vocal music. My step grandfather was an honorary professor at a university and changed my introvert personality to be more active, fostering leadership through education. I believe that thanks to them and my grandparents, I could accomplish all the things that I achieved now. I love and thank them with all my heart, and always try hard to repay their love. Q7. What is your dream and what are your future plans? I am going to enroll in the HYU graduate school of the same major next semester. In addition, next year, I am planning to participate in famous music competitions in Korea, such as contests hosted by Joongang and Dong-a newspapers, or by Gwangju and Daegu provinces. I am also going to study abroad someday. I have a lot to learn, and I still believe that I need to try very hard to accomplish my future dreams. If I can endeavor as much as I have done until now, I would say that... I really want to become an opera singer. ▲ Jo dreams of becoming an opera singer in the future. (Photo courtesy of Jo Chan-hee) Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-11 14

[Event]Exploration of the 2016 Hanyang Baseball League

On Saturday, November 12th, the final match of the 2016 Hanyang Baseball League took place at the school stadium. Regardless of victory or defeat, all teams congratulated their endeavors to meet the edge of the league. While inquiring minutely on the Hanyang Baseball League, circumstantial reports on the delight of playing baseball that the champion, runner-up, and the tail-ender teams reveal also intrigue attention. History of the Hanyang Baseball League The Hanyang Baseball League first initiated in 2009 with 5 teams consisted of Bullets of the department of natural science, Civilians of Department of Civil Engineering, Jjalyoo and AESQ of Department of Medicine, and Aseul-aseul of Department of Political Science and Diplomacy. The beginning of the league was an attractive souvenir of the amity among colleges of Hanyang University. Without any leading initiatives of official organizations, each team congregated together to set forth their ambitions for baseball. The league thrived as a popular club of the school, engaging a host of students. However, the league not always flourished as a smoothly systemized organization. In 2010, the director of Hanyang University’s official baseball team, Chun Bo-sung, sponsored the league. However, from 2011, the league returned immediately to its original characteristic of an unofficial organization. But due to the swift alternations in the league, many teams began to stir up troubles, alluding vaguely their different opinions. The friction soothed out by 2014, when the teams again solidified their volitions to play baseball together with another forced joined- the representative baseball club, Bulsae. Thus, the Hanyang Baseball League was completed as an official league, symbolizing the baseball spirit of Hanyang University. ▲ Beginning of the final match between D-Dogs and Engineers ▲ Fierce competition of the Hanyang Baseball League Circumstantial Report on the 2016 Season The Hanyang Baseball League of 2016 let down a curtain with the fierce competitions between 8 teams. Team D-Dogs won the championship, followed by the second place- team Engineers. Team Aseul-aseul marked the eighth place, leaving much to be desired. Leaders of all 3 teams interviewed disclosed their epilogues of the league, wrapping up their adversities. Leader and the director of the champion team D-Dogs, Song Woo-Seok (Department of Chemistry, 3rd year), revealed his concluding remarks as so. “First, I want to express my gratitude for my fellow team members, whom I attribute the championship medal to,” said Song. To the question regarding the best players, Song answered by mentioning 2 members, Choi Jun-Hyuk (4th year) who is graduating this year and Jung Ui-Don (2nd year) whom he referred as the MVP. The strategy his team used for the final game was trying several simulations beforehand to applicably allocate 3 pitchers at the right moment. He also disclosed the meaning of the team name D-Dogs, which stands for “Drunken Dogs.” Team D-Dogs maintains the diverse pool of people from 10 different departments of Hanyang University, which requires the director to balance strategies to fit the changing members caused by conscriptions or graduations. “In the process of winning the championship of the Hanyang Baseball league, 3 years in a row, I constantly realized that it is vital to find the equilibrium between the delight of baseball and steady demands for practices. Also, watching other formidable teams losing their ace players due to conscription or graduation, leading to their downturn, it inspired me to train new members harder, hence maintaining the team consisting of all equally skillful members,” revealed Song. ▲ Directors of the champion (D-Dogs) and runner-up (Engineers) teams holding the trophies (from left to right) Jung Kyung-Tae (Department of Electronic Engineering, alumnus), the leader and director of the runner-up team Engineers, also spoke his mind about this year’s league. “Due to the pressure the word final expresses, many of our team members did not fully displayed their abilities. However, I am still proud of my team that we got the second place and have to future to win the championship,” disclosed Jung. Hesitating to answer who the best players are, he revealed that although all players are the best to him, best players are newbies Jeon Hyo-Sung, an ace pitcher number 87, player number 66 Lee Ye-Seung who balance the general atmosphere of the team, and player number 55 Kim Dan-Young who encourage young members. The strategies his team used to prepare for the final match were the delicate discussion of player arrangement and consistent practices regarding the plotted line-up. Jung also disclosed more information on his team that team Engineers consists of students from the departments of electrical, electronic, and computer engineering, which first began as a catch-ball club in 2011. Since the team still has few remaining skilled graduates, numbers of new players are bound to be ousted from the starting lineup. Hence, Jung emphasized the importance to train new players harder to give all members the equal chance to participate at games. “I hope that the day will come when the audience will be astounded by how team Engineers has the perfect teamwork, while individual players have excessive abilities,” wrapped up Jung. Last but not Least, team Aseul-aseul’s director Ko Kyung-Mo (Department of Political Science and Diplomacy, 2nd year) also revealed his opinions on participating the league and his team’s final score. “Although our team placed the 9th, the baseball league allowed the team members to get together and feel the delight of playing games. It is currently our plan to win more than 1 game and this plan motivates the whole team to devote more to practice,” revealed Ko. Also to the question regarding the best player, he answered that there are no best players of the team at the moment, due to the score of the last place, but this situation appeals to Ko, the need of bigger pool of players from diverse departments. As the initial team of the league, history behind Aseul-aseul is special. It is the only baseball club of Department of Political Science and Diplomacy, which was formed by professor Kim Sung-Soo in 2009. League of 2014 was a heyday for Aseul-aseul, going up to the semi-finals. “It is our hope to recruit more players and show the potential strength of our team. Also, we desire to draw attention of more students and staffs of Hanyang University to enjoy the league more often,” added Ko. ▲ Picture of the champion team (D-Dogs) celebrating their victory Competition among various teams has now completed with the end of Hanyang Baseball League of 2016. Although the season is over, the sweat and passion of all players for the pleasure of baseball will never stop them from practicing constantly underway. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jae-oh

2016-11 14

[Academics]Architecture Over the Centuries

Professor Nam Sung-taek of the Department of Architecture holds his prime interest in the comprehensive theory of symphonizing diverse scales of artificial environmental design from a small-scaled objet—a French word meaning object, material, or thing—to a large-scaled city. In his paper, 'The Effect of Everyday Objects on Indoor Remodeling: Loos and Le Corbusier, 'Housing Professors' ', Nam minutely elucidated the relationship between objets and space, which all together contribute to the principles of architecture. He also accounted for the change of the roles of architects and the definition of architecture design as a result of the shift in production of goods from artisan’s craftsmanship to mass production in factories as industrialization took place in the 20th century. Shift in the Role of Architects ▲ Nam explains that an architect is not a form master but a housing professor. Up until the early 20th century, the idea of total art was dominant in the field of architecture. It is a system in which an architect designs not only the architecture itself but also what is contained within and stands around that construction, from the objets that relate to everyday life including spoons and chairs to the entire city at large. In other words, an architect used to design everything from an objet to the whole city, becoming a “form master” who created and designed small objets, spaces, and architectures that eventually expanded and came together to form a city. It was not only the buildings themselves that portray the architect’s work but also what is in the building and how the objets were put in place as well. This convention often emphasized the artistic work that regarded the whole city as one architect’s art work, giving rise to the concept of total art again. The architects who sought the ideals of total art were tossed with an insurmountable dilemma—whether to reject or accept the shift—as the industrialized city began producing things that could not be hand-made and that which were more readily accessible, suggesting an alternative option for the residents to design their own homes instead of entrusting the experts. In the face of such confusion, two architects who proposed a new notion at the time were Adolf Loos of Austria and Le Corbusier of Switzerland. The two architects embraced the on-going change and adjusted the principles of architecture accordingly, pioneering a concept called 'housing professor', which pointed out that architects are no longer form masters but teachers who educate people on residence and living: that is, training them how to select the appropriate objets for individual’s houses, rather than designing every little piece in a work. Their proposition allowed the residents to scheme their own houses by choosing objets that suited their taste and personality, creating what is like a personal 'museum' or 'gallery'. “I admire the two outstanding architects in many aspects. They did not simply encage themselves within the traditional boundaries of architecture and rejected external factors such as changes or surrounding environments but attentively examined all the potential influences around them that might have an impact on their work. Embracing and incorporating the on-going circumstance candidly was the key to permitting further improvements to breakthrough. To create every piece of a complete architecture from an objet at small to a city at large, the two architects observed and applied the outside forces into their architecture and did not hesitate to change their views if necessary,” noted Nam. Contemporary Architecture It was not so strange in the past for an individual to seek the help of an architect to design the doors and tables to be placed in their houses. However, industrialization pivoted this perspective, by letting individuals to freely choose and customize the designs of their houses. Consequently, the opposite is true today. people seldom desire guidance of architects and prefer to independently pick the objets and sketch their own rooms when it comes to architecture. On this note, with people having much interest in designing their residences, Nam hopes those interests connect to the study of architecture, which became too cultural to be solely considered as an academic branch nowadays. He hopes that architecture will mean something more than just a part of industry and highlight its cultural aspect which can be a crucial part in our history. ▲ Nam pinpointed that architecture is part of our culture and history. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju