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2020-01 13

[Student]Hanyang's Shakespeare from the Spring Literacy Contest

In the past, publishing was extremely difficult for a new author. To support them, Korea’s major newspapers held the spring literacy contest (신춘문예, Shinchunmunye) on the first of January each year since 1925, giving new writers a chance to publish their prize-winning entries and make their debut as a writer. Although private publication has become easier nowadays via SNS, the spring literacy contest still holds its status as the time-honored, formal gateway into literacy. This year, three Hanyangians, Shin Hye-yeong, Lim Ji-hoon, and Kim Ji-woo, earned the glory of winning the 2020 contest. Among them, Kim Ji-woo (Department of English Language and Literature, 4th year) won in the play category with Path at the early age of 24. Path, a play authored by Kim Ji-woo (Department of English Language and Literature, 4th year), won the spring literacy contest play category this year. Path is a short play in which two child characters, Mino and Ir go on a journey tied on a freight train from Mexico to America in search for a better life. Kim gained inspiration from a documentary she had seen eight years ago. The play was “raw,” described the judges, “as if the author was the actor herself moving on the stage,” and “has high literary potential,” even compared to ‘The Little Prince’ by Saint-Exupéry. Winning was unexpected for Kim as Path was her first-ever play work. “I’ve loved writing since I was a child but only recently decided to pursue the career as a writer. Even then, my goal was to become a musical writer. So Path was the first play that I wrote,” said Kim. However, Kim said she always liked watching plays and feeling their vivid atmosphere. “I watch two to six plays a month. Sometimes they would sell the script, so I would buy them and study.” Path is a story of two 15-year-old Mexican children heading to America by clinging onto a freight train. (Photo courtesy of TheSeoulShinmun) As the most memorable scene, the author picked the scene where the two children imagine a coyote which they have never seen. "The hypothesis behind the story is that imagination is the driving force of life. This particular scene delivered it very well," said Kim. "I also wanted to write the story somewhat vaguely. It was hard, but people who read the play gave me their different interpretations, which were fun and interesting." Path will be performed on stage around March and April, as part of the one-act play of the spring literacy contest prize-winning entries. Kim spoke of her aspiration as a now-formal writer that she has many ideas and stories that are waiting to become a play in the future. “I’m still quite dazed by the fact that my play won such an honorable contest. I will always aspire to become a better writer,” said Kim. Kim has many ideas and stories that she will turn into plays in the future. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Lim Ji-woo il04131@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-05 26

[Student]Dads Are Back with The New Grey

Lim Ji-woo il04131@hanyang.ac.kr Photos courtesy of The New Grey Photos by Kim Joo-eun Design by Lim Ji-woo, Kim Min-ji

2018-12 02

[Student]Seeing the Future Through the AR Lenses

Augmented Reality (AR) looks wondrous in movies (for instance, the screen on Iron Man’s helmet). However, the current technology is yet to catch up with the movies, and trying on the AR smart glasses in real life could be a heavy, uncomfortable, and dizzying experience. The attempts to make these experiences extra light, comfortable, and high-quality has finally bore fruit – the CEO of LetinAR, Kim Jae-hyuk (Department of Industrial Engineering, 4th year) is the hero. LetinAR, co-founded by Kim and his friend and the Chief Technology Officer Ha Jeong-hun in 2016, is a start-up company that invented and produced the AR lenses. The company has recently received investments worth 3.6 million USD from Kakao Ventures, DSC Investment, Korea Asset Investment Securities, Naver Corporation, and Platinum Tech Investment, all thanks to the self-developed 'Pin Mirror (also known as PinMRTM) lens' which has been acknowledged for its phenomenal breakthrough in the AR-lens techniques. The Pin Mirror lens. Kim Jae-hyeok (Department of Industrial Engineering, 4th year) clarified that a newer version will resemble ordinary glasses much more, compared to the old version in the picture. (Photo courtesy of LetinAR) Kim explained that the original wearable AR smart glasses had many problems. “The glasses were too big, screens were too small, or out of focus. On top of these, they were hard to manufacture.” So Kim came up with a different approach, using the pin-mirror-effect technique, in which the microdisplay light is projected directly to the eye lens via a mirror tinier than a pupil. Whereas the former lenses blurred the image when the object was too near (similar to how the human eyes blur out anything that gets too near to the pupils), the new method allows the lens to stay in focus regardless of closeness, as well as of individual eyesight. Along with the more comfortable vision, the lenses became smaller, closely resembling the ordinary glasses and had a much increased productivity. “During this year’s Consumer Electronics Show, many renowned scholars tested the lens, leaving truly impressed by its performance. They said billions of won along with the complex and latest technologies invested could not overcome the limitations of the AR lens. What we have done is provide a simple, yet powerful solution to it all,” recalled Kim. Demonstration of the LetinAR's technique in the Mobile World Congress 2018. (Photo courtesy of LetinAR) They expect to have a formal announcement of the completed technology for full-fledged commercialization next January. “AR is yet an unexplored field, but the future seems bright,” assured Kim. “Just like how we have moved from desktops to laptops, and from laptops to phones, we constantly seek portability. As with the phones, the AR glasses will lead the future trend, and they will be absorbed in our daily lives.” Thus, the goal of LetinAR is to initiate that trend, added Kim. Indeed, it is a matter of time until we will all be wearing the light and comfortable 100-inch-screen on our eyes with the help of LetinAR glasses. Kim's goal is to develop a more portable AR lens and raise LetinAR as the trend-setting company. Lim Ji-woo il04131@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung