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2019-10 14

[Student]The Youngest to Pass the 5th Level Open Recruitment Administration Post

According to the announcement on October 1st by the Ministry of Personnel Management Cyber Examination Center, 8,157 people applied for this year’s 5th level open recruitment administration post, and 270 were ultimately selected. Lee Jun-pyo (Department of Policy Studies, 4th year) was accepted for the general administration post in the Daegu region, which made him one of the youngest people to pass the 5th level open recruitment public administration post. Lee Jun-pyo (Department of Policy Studies, 4th year) is one of the youngest to pass the 2019, 5th level, open recruitment administration post. In the civil service examination, which presents several stages, the primary exam tests candidates on English, Korean history, the constitution, and PSAT. The secondary exam for the administrative post includes four required subjects including administrative law, the science of public administration, economics, and political science, as well as one elective subject, from which Lee chose information system theory. The third part of the examination were interviews which take place over a course of two stages, and candidates are tested on personal PT presentation and debate. Successful candidates are admitted into the National Human Resources Development Institute around April or May of next year, and after a probationary period, they are then assigned to government departments. Lee started studying for the public administration examination when he was in his first year of college, which makes it a total of roughly three years of study and three trials of examinations before hearing the exciting news of his acceptance. He was in a geography club during his second year of high school, and he wrote a thesis on the direction of development in Daegu through improving the domiciliation conditions. He was attracted to public policy when he began formulating and executing policies by analyzing the local finance policies or traffic policies of the government and tried to make alternatives. “I applied for the 5th level open recruitment because I found it to be a career that can solve many social problems confronted by our country and have a positive impact on people.” Lee tried to find correlations between school and the exam. He made the most of school courses by taking morning classes to start the day early and taking lectures related to the examination. He studied mostly at the school library, the Hanyang Cyber University Café, or in the HIT Yang Min-yong Lounge after class. He found the administration exam class at Hanyang helpful because of the secondary mock exams which are graded with commentary on the questions from professors within and outside of school. For the secondary descriptive examination, he practiced writing fast. Correcting posture when writing and changing the pen to one that fits his hand well contributed to faster handwriting. He also mentioned how he often read long sentences to improve his writing skills and read news articles, textbook, theses, or precedents in its full text to familiarize himself with vocabulary and expressions applicable for the descriptive exam. He learned how to yield the turn during debate, how to find opportunity to make a remark, and how to organize and summarize other debater’s opinions, which all contributed to his successful performance in the interview. He even learned how to concisely but faithfully write the PT statement or make flexible judgments according to the detailed cases in the problem. He then participated at school studies to practice the interview, which helped him to not be nervous during the real interview. Lee admitted that he felt the pressure on his shoulders of serving in the public post, as he was studying the second and third examination subjects. He learned about issues where interests conflict, or matters that could lead to international conflict, and cases in which existing industries in decline go through hardships of life due to change in generations. He felt that only by learning in depth and building wisdom could he realize the common good without harming anyone. “Study firmly in your own style and do take care of your health at the change of the seasons!” said Lee as words of encouragement to future test-takers. While many people may ask Lee’s key to success, he confidently shared that his faith in himself was what kept him going even after failing the first exam in 2017 with a rather lower score compared to the passing grade. He studied with the belief that he could pass the exam if he supplemented the parts in which he was deficient in. Now facing the responsibility and duties ahead as a public official, Lee Jun-pyo stated his resolution. “I want to become a civil servant who actively approaches those in need of my help, from the humblest position.” Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-09 02

[Student]The Author of Writing Life Science in a Simple Way

There is a student who wrote two books during his college years and is on a road to writing many more based upon his expertise. Meet Park Jong-hyeon (Department of Life Science, 4th year), an undergraduate at Hanyang University and the author of Writing Life Science in a Simple Way, a book which serves as much knowledge as it can convey on the difficult discipline of life science in simple wordings. Fresh Water Story of a Water Drop was the first book written by Park and was published in 2013 when he was still in high school. He ran an online community in which he wrote many articles that deliver useful biological information to his community members. He wrote about how to raise organisms and was asked by the Biological Research Information Center (BRIC) to write a column that would later become his first book. Park Jong-hyeon (Department of Life Science, 4th year) shares his passion for sharing knowledge of life science to the public. He started writing his second book during his second year at Hanyang. He had done many activities in the form of talent or education donation, including science education volunteer work that was funded by the Ministry of Education. He had to explain science concepts in detail during these volunteer jobs, which solidified the basis for him to transfer spoken descriptions into written work later when writing a book. He mostly used the summer and winter breaks to jot something down. It took a total of four years to complete Writing Life Science in a Simple Way, which was published in February of this year. He picked the possibility of delivering erroneous information in his book as the part that concerned him the most. This was driven by the incident when one of his several columns was uploaded on Naver with faulty information. After such a mistake, he was determined to deliver only proven facts in his book, and he read all related readings three to four months prior to the date of publication to confirm that was the case. Other than that, he always deliberated on how to attract the public and to make sure people easily understood his book. The cover of Writing Life Science in a Simple Way (Photo courtesy of Park) Writing Life Science in a Simple Way covers a wide range of science knowledge in a concise manner. “Students who dream of becoming a scientist will surely find this book helpful,” said Park. He targeted teenagers, and included in his book sections regarding high school life science subject one and two, the story of dinosaurs, bioethanol, state of the art technology related to life science, and newly discovered facts on organisms. Textbooks tend to only recite facts, whereas Park tried to weave daily phenomena into life science. You can also obtain insight into the author’s opinion regarding ethical issues of controversial topics like clone technology, gene manipulation, genetically modified organism and more. A new book is to be published around next summer, containing general explanations of science and its impact on society. It will also accommodate content about the ambiguity of science, such as how nuclear energy can produce electricity at a cheap price, and yet the aftereffect of atom bombs still stays intact today. Park plans on going to graduate school and studying science journalism or science communicology, which combines two things he loves: science and writing. Park recommends to those who major in science related fields--to stay away from restricting oneself to one subject but to try various things. “My goal is to reach as far as I can go. Write a book. Go to graduate school, and maybe one day, I’ll naturally become someone distinct. My motto is to be diligent right this moment,” said Park. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Ju-eun

2019-03 25

[Student]The Youngest to Conquer the 4 Deserts Grand Slam 2018

An ordinary young man serving in the military was fascinated by a magazine that he read by chance, which covered the story of three first reserves (military reserve force) who completed a marathon in the Gobi Desert. “What brings these people to the desert? Why would they do such a thing?” Many questions emerged in the young man's head, which later led him to chasing some life-changing experiences. The young man in the military was Yoo Dong-hyeon (Department of Electrical Bio-Engineering, 1st year), who became the youngest male in the world to complete the Grand Slam, at the age of 22. Yoo Dong-hyeon (Department of Electrical Bio-Engineering, 1st year) shared his story of the four deserts that he conquered, on March 22, 2019. The rocky beginning Yoo was strongly drawn to the idea of participating in the race, but by the time he found out about the four deserts race series, he only had three months to prepare. He was still serving in the military, so he needed permission for overseas travel. Moreover, he had to receive donations to cover the races' costly entry fees. He mostly received sponsorships from companies, individual donations from seniors that he knew from high school, and from colleagues from the military. It was Yoo’s first time participating in a marathon, so he needed to exercise and enhance his stamina before the real events began. Many factors were in the way of his participation, but fortunately, with great luck, all was set and he was signed in. The courses of the desert race The Sahara Race was first in the 4 race series that began in late April until early May, and took place in the Namib Desert in Skeleton Coast National Park on the coast bordering the Atlantic Ocean. The Gobi March takes place in Central Mongolia during the hot summer months, and the course brings runners through vast green grasslands, stupas, and temples. His favorite race was the Atacama Crossing in Chile. The course consists of infamous salt flats, huge sand dunes, canyons, and glittering night skies. It was also the most memorable because his shoes got ripped and his feet bled due to the piercing salt from the region. However, the place had the most beautiful night skies with thousands of visible stars. The Last Desert in Antarctica had 10 courses including many tracks that visited islands and bays. During the Atacama Crossing, hardened salt pierced through shoes and left the participants in pain no choice but to speed through the desert. (Photo courtesy of Yoo) The magnificent night skies of (top) the Sahara and Atacama Deserts (Photo courtesy of Yoo) Yoo Dong-hyeon (center) happily crossing the finishing line of the Atacama Crossing alongside his friends. (Photo courtesy of Yoo) While running During the race across the desert, Yoo met many people of various backgrounds and nationalities. Among them, there was a visually impaired man and a person with one leg. While Yoo had been complaining all throughout his life about things small and big, his new friends were relaxed and seemed happy. “I learned to be thankful for what I had and to be more relaxed in my life.” Walking through Antarctica, the Last Desert (Photo courtesy of Yoo) Groups of penguins welcoming the marathoners to Antarctica (Photo courtesy of Yoo) The tent mates slept together in one tent after the race was over for the day. (Photo courtesy of Yoo) If the runners finished the race early, they would gather around near the campfire with their dinner in hand, and talk about the many ongoing global issues. (Photo courtesy of Yoo) After the marathon “What does a marathon mean to you?” After hearing this question, Yoo took his time to answer. “Marathon is now what I live with every day. I used to give up easily, but now I know that hard times pass, and regardless of the speed or the time it takes to get there, I can finish the race.” Yoo completing his marathon journey after the race of the Last Desert 2018 (Photo courtesy of Yoo) Yoo hugging fellow runners after the first Sahara race ended (Photo courtesy of Yoo) The 4 Deserts Grand Slam crew at their last destination (Photo courtesy of Yoo) Although he is very proud of his achievements, Yoo also felt hollow after the marathon. Looking for more challenges, he is planning on participating in a triathlon held in Korea, as well as going on a cross-country bike trip across America through a contest being held in July 2019. With his glowing eyes full of excitement, he advised, “Do not hesitate. It is easy to be frightened by the titles like the race of the polar regions, but human beings are stronger than you think. I hope you challenge yourselves to grow bigger.” Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-02 18

[Student]MOYE, a Brand Created by Students From the Department of Clothing and Textiles

MOYE is a fashion brand created by a group of students from the Department of Clothing and Textiles. Its name consists of two meanings: it is a shortened word that comes from the sentence 'moduga yesoolgada,' which means ‘everyone is an artist’ in Korean, originally quoted by the artist Joseph Beuys; it also has the meaning of putting together the elderly and children, according to the dictionary. In this sense, MOYE implies that every ordinary person is an artist. For their project this time, the artists involved were elderly women from the Sageun-dong Elderly Welfare Center. This week, the creators of the brand, MOYE shared their brand story. (From left) Head officer Song Ha-yoon (Department of Clothing and Textiles, 3rd year), financial officer and designer Kim Seung-hyun (Department of Clothing and Textiles, 2nd year) and marketing officer and designer Lee Eun-joo (Department of Clothing and Textiles, 4th year) of MOYE As its name implies, the designers for MOYE are ordinary people. For their new project, MOYE decided to make elderly women their artists. Their reason for doing so was because the date of their project launch was on February 12th, which was after the Lunar New Year’s Day when the concept of a generation gap was felt the most. There is a reason behind why MOYE chose to use communication as the core identity of the brand. “I had the experience of transferring to different schools many times. From that, I realized the importance of having someone to talk to. I value everyone's story, so I wanted to listen to and deliver them through the medium of clothes,” said Song, the head officer of MOYE. The artists of MOYE’s project, the elderly from Sageun-dong Elderly Welfare Center, are drawing the designs for clothing. (Photo courtesy of Song) While there are many paths available for those wishing to launch a brand, the creators of MOYE decided to raise a funding at Wadiz, which is a crowd funding platform. This was a decision resulting from lessons the founders had learned last summer when their project was promoted off line. They faced the limitations of initial capital, lack of item diversity caused by mass production, and difficulty delivering the story behind their designed products. MOYE’s clothing line was created through four steps. First, the designers listened to and sympathized with the elderly at Sageun-dong Elderly Welfare Center. During this process, the MOYE designers caught a story with an impactful impression and asked them to draw their story. Finally, the designers refined the drawings and the stories are now being delivered through the completed clothing. One of MOYE's clothing designs called ‘Portrait’, which is the most sought-after clothing piece that depicts the lifetime of an artist in one single line. The colorful colors describe the emotions that follow a life event. (Photo courtesy of Song) “I was surprised to hear that a 73 year old artist that I worked with had learned photoshopping skills when she was younger. It sounds like a new generation's skill that the generation gap started to seem obscure to me,” recalled Kim. Beginning next week, MOYE’s next project is going to have children as their target, from vulnerable social groups. MOYE follows by the ideology that while they have artists from vulnerable social classes, they do not sell through emotional appeal. Rather, they plan to prove the excellence of pure imagination of children through commercial values. “I hope our next project will implant courage to the children, despite the insufficient love they might have received in the past.” A picture of the designers from team MOYE and their model. All models and photographers are from the Department of Clothing and Textiles. (Photo courtesy of Song) Clothes are worn and consumed by people every day, and MOYE successfully fulfilled their objective to communicate and deliver one’s story through clothing. While their online funding ends on March 3rd, MOYE plans on donating 100 percent of the net gains to the Sageun-dong Elderly Welfare Center. They will continue their projects by creating an official club on campus, with the aim of breaking down the stereotypes for beginning start-ups and the notion that finding employment is impossibly tough. Click here to view MOYE's clothing lines Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-12 17

[Student]When a Lion Goes to School

The student-made YouTube channel that represents Hanyang University, “When a Lion Goes to School," now has over 14,000 subscribers. Uploading video content related to school life in Hanyang University, Choi E-re (Department of Industrial Engineering, 2nd year), who often undertakes the role of an emcee in the video making process, spoke about the process of starting a Youtube channel that Hanyang University students can relate to, and the story of owning and growing a channel led by students themselves. The YouTube channel, "When a Lion Goes to School" currently has more than 14,000 subscribers and 29 videos. (Photo courtesy of "When a Lion Goes to School") Choi E-re (Department of Industrial Engineering, 2nd year) talked about the YouTube channel that he and his crew run, known as, “When a lion goes to school" on December 14th, 2018. The beginning It was this March that things first started with the “When a Lion Goes to School” channel on Youtube when three students from the Department of Industrial Engineering came up with the idea. Unquestionably, editing is a crucial part of making video production, so they even went on to contact the dean of the Department of Media Communication to gather editors for their crew. For the first video, which is titled, “We asked Hanyang University engineering students," was uploaded on April 20th. They introduced the stereotypes that people usually have of students from the Department of Engineering. When they were first starting out in YouTube, one of the major concerns was regarding whether to target Hanyang University students or college students in general. They ended up targeting Hanyang University because a channel dedicated to introducing academic information to the life styles of Hanyang University students did not exist. There are a total of eight members who work as a team for “When a Lion Goes to School.” Rather than assigning a specific role to each members, they strive to all work together. Working together through the whole process has both pros and cons, according to Choi. It can be hard to gather ideas effectively since there are so many people participating, but it does give them the feeling of accomplishment by working as a team and watching the channel grow together. Process of making a video Making and uploading a video takes two weeks. The members have to hold a meeting on Sundays to share their ideas on new content, and after that, they decide on a topic and begin writing a questionnaire for the interviewees. “When a Lion Goes to School” team recruits guests through social media, they first begin by uploading a form asking for volunteers that match with the theme of the video for that week. They then contact the guests, find the right schedule, and ready themselves to film by completing the questionnaire with 9 to 10 questions and finalize a written script that helps emcee the whole process. They edit the video using photoshop, captions, background music, and special effects. Then the video is uploaded that weekend. The filming of the video in a studio (Photo courtesy of "When a Lion Goes to School") As one of the more memorable times since starting this channel, in one of the early videos titled, “Hanyang University Culture Sock!,” the crew had to look for exchange students from foreign countries but did not know how. They started to look in Hanyang Plaza, a global lounge of Sarang-bang, the lobby of the International Building, the amphitheater, and so on. Exchange students who joined the interview later thanked the crew for making a memorable experience for them in Korea. For a future video, the crew hopes to interview graduate students who have successfully found their position in society. "We want to loosen up the seriousness that the topic of employment brings and make a helpful mentor video for undergraduates,” said Choi. Future goals “When a lion goes to school” team would first like to grow into a channel that all students in Hanyang University are aware of. They would then like to widen their target viewers and share the stories of college students in general. “One common wish that all crew members share is that we hope the channel will continue on even after the starters of this channel graduate and leave. That is our strongest wish.” Said Choi Ee-rae. Warm hearted comments that students from Hanyang University wrote on the initial videos are still remembered by the crew members. One comment said that these videos could be the competitive edge for our school. “Thank you for giving us great support. I don’t wish for much but I hope you keep watching our videos with open hearts.” The crew members of "When a Lion Goes to School" (Photo courtesy of Choi) Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-11 05

[Student]Students from the School of Business Pass the 35th Customs Broker Examination

A banner congratulating those who passed the examination to be a certified customs broker was displayed in the School of Business at Hanyang University. On September 19th of this year, the names of applicants that passed the second-round of the 35th certified customs broker examination were announced. Names such as Kim Yoo-min (School of Business, 4th year) and Kim Ji-hoon (School of Business, 4th year) were proudly displayed. (From left) Kim Ji-hoon (School of Business, 4th year) and Kim Yoo-min (School of Business, 4th year) are pointing at their names in the banner that reads, "Congratulations on passing the 35th Customs Broker Exam 2018." A customs broker clears shipments of imported and exported goods. The Customs Broker Exam is held each year, and the percentage of candidates that passed this year was 37.95 percent for the first-round and 6.62 percent for the second-round, indicating the difficulty in becoming a customs broker. The first-round of the exam consisted of multiple choice questions, while the second-round consisted of essay questions. Every subject is scored out of 100, and those who receive more than 40 points or higher on every subject (the average is 60) pass the exam. However, when those who pass 60 points are less than the required number of people, which was 90 people total, those with the higher average pass the exam. Kim Yoo-min passed the exam with an average score of 58 and Kim Ji-hoon with 61. (From left to right) News H interviewed Kim Yoo-min (School of Business, 4th year) and Kim Ji-hoon (School of Business, 4th year) on November 2nd, 2018. Kim Ji-hoon started studying for the exam in 2014, and it took him 4 years to pass the exam this year. For Kim Yoo-min, the preparation for the examination took 1 and a half years. They both studied day and night. Kim Ji-hoon preferred to study at school, setting a goal to study from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. They both agreed that the examination necessitates heavy loads of memorizing. They emphasized that repeating the studying process and constantly writing the content out is very important. In order to memorize effectively, Kim Ji-hoon wrote everything he learned in one book and kept going back to it. “It’s easy to forget even the things you studied yesterday. Memorizing by making acronyms or creating a sentence using the important words helps to effectively memorize a large quantity of content." From January to June is the period for the trial examination. There are 24 mock tests in total, and students take them weekly. Since scores over 60 are not common, curved-grading is done on the test scores. “It feels devastating when I don’t get in the top 90," said Kim Yoo-min. Kim Ji-hoon agreed and added that repeating the studying process gets exhausting, and the pressure to obtain a high score makes things very hard to go on. A sample of one of Ji-hoon's books that he used to increase the effectiveness of memorizing (Photo courtesy of Kim) To cope with all the stress from studying, Kim Ji-hoon and Kim Yoo-min took a day off after the trial examination ended. They would forget about the test and watch television, meet friends, or eat delicious food to refresh their minds. “One thing I took with me from studying for the customs broker examination is swimming. Swimming helped me get through the long days of studying in a healthy state," said Kim Yoo-min. Hanyang University does not have departments or classes related to commerce and trade. This can make things a little more difficult for those planning on or who are already preparing for the Customs Broker Examination. “Just try to get the exam over with as quickly as possible. Effectiveness runs low if the studying period increases,” said Kim Ji-hoon. “I hope luck is with you. You might see what you memorized the night before in the examination paper. Also, it is rather hard to find someone that is preparing to become a customs broker inside Hanyang University, but I still recommend you to look for and be connected with those who are in the same position as you,” added Kim Yoo-min. After the long and what seemed like never-ending days of fighting with oneself, Kim Ji-hoon and Kim Yoo-min are now taking in some deep breaths before they go on to plan for another goal. They plan on taking some days off before they attend vocational education in January of the following year. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-10 29

[Student]Challenge Yourselves, Youth!

Graduate students from the Department of Mechanical Engineering who are also members of the team, Machine Dynamics Laboratory won first place in the IEEE VTS Motor Vehicles Challenge, 2018. The members include Lee Woong (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doctoral Program), Jeong Hae-seong and Park Do-hyun (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Integrated Master’s-Doctor’s Program). IEEE stands for Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and VTS stands for Vehicular Technology Society. The team was invited to the IEEE VPPC (Vehicle Power And Propulsion Conference) held in Chicago, IL, USA, from the 27th to the 30th of August this year, which they presented their research findings and earned 3000 dollars as their first place prize. (From left) The team leader, Lee Woong (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doctoral Program) and two team members Jeong Hae-seong and Park Do-hyun (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Integrated Master’s-Doctor’s Program) were able to receive first prize in the VTS challenge with the guidance of their advisor for their team, professor Kim Nam-wook (Department of Mechanical Engineering). The VTS challenge competes for minimization of energy consumption and aims to develop a control strategy that can be applied to real cars. This year, the challenge was to minimize the mileage energy consumption of General Motors (GM) hybrid vehicle, ‘Volt 1st gen.' 52 teams from 20 countries participated in the challenge. The online posting regarding the opening of the VTS challenge were uploaded on January 5th, so the team had two months of preparation before the energy management submission deadline in March. The results were announced the following month. In the evaluation process, the jurors for the competition run the simulation model by themselves and whichever vehicle that consumes the least energy wins first place. The Machine Dynamics Laboratory team applied one of the optimal control theory called, ‘Pontryagin’s minimum principle.' It decides the relative value of the quantity of fuel and electricity and minimizes it. The system itself constantly monitors the remaining oil and electricity and decides whether to use more fuels or electric motor. Without a doubt, the final results had to be good due to the characteristic of hybrid cars to increase energy efficiency when the remainder quantity is similar. Members of the Machine Dynamics Laboratory explained that they have been researching cars for 3 years, yet this was the first time to receive such an honorable reward. (Photo courtesy of Lee) The VTS challenge is held every year but with a different subject and vehicle to work with. “Nothing is for certain yet, but maybe for next year’s competition, our team members will participate as leaders.” Lee Woong (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doctoral Program) who actively took part in the VTS challenge as a leader went on to say, “challenge yourselves, youth!” Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-09 17

[Student]Equestrian Athlete Kim Hyeok Earns Two Medals at the Asian Games 2018

Dressage is “the art of riding and training a horse in a manner that develops obedience, flexibility, and balance.” It is evaluated by criterions such as beauty and accuracy; the judge subjectively scores players on how beautifully and correctly they make of a particular movement. Kim Hyeok (Division of Sports & Well-Being, major in Sports in Life, 4th year) who put forth great effort to earn a silver medal in the team event, received a bronze medal in the individual game at the Asian Games 2018 Jakarta Palembang on 23rd of August, 2018. Whilst it was Kim’s first time competing in the Asian Games, the equestrian athlete proudly brought back two medals to represent Korea. Kim Hyeok (Division of Sports & Well-Being, major in Sports in Life, 4th year) is smiling after receiving the bronze medal in dressage. (Photo courtesy of Yonhap News) Kim started horseback riding when he was a first grade student in high school. His father encouraged him to try horseback riding as a hobby. Since horseback riding was the only sport involving an animal, it appealed to Kim who loved animals of all kind. The reason he chose dressage in particular, was because dressage requires more delicate movements to control the horse in the way he wants it to be. “Dressage is a sport that promotes growth of both the athlete and the horse. That’s what I like about this sport so much.” The 2018 Asian Games was a special game for Kim since he waited 4 years to compete. When asked how he managed to persist in the 4 years of preparation and through the suspenseful competition, he said that he trained himself thinking that this was his last chance, and also by reminding himself that 4 years was too long of a time to give up or turn back. Not everything was easy for Kim. While training for the Asian Games, the hardest part was Jakarta’s hot and humid weather throughout the training. He said it was tough adjusting to the hot air, both for the athletes and their horses. Although Kim is now taking time off from school, attending school and training at the same time was a very difficult job to get done, he says. Kim exercises in the mornings and trains at the Hwaseong horse riding course in the afternoon during school life. Since it was Kim’s first time taking part in the Asian Game, he focused more on the team event than the individual game. “In the team event I was playing with seniors and I could depend on them, but during the individual game, I felt more nervous because I was truly alone in the competition.” Kim competing at the 2018 Asian Games (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim’s next mountain to climb is the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and the 2022 Hangzhou Asian Games. Korea has won first place in dressage in six out of the seven Asian Games held in the past. The great potential and possibility that Kim and the other equestrian athletes have shown the people of Korea through the 2018 Asian Games has allowed spectators to look forward to further good news in this sport. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-09 03

[Student]Unhappy? Pack Your Stuff, and Leave!

“If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” Steve Jobs made it clear that if the answer was “no” for too many times, you had some changes to make in your life. Kim Jung-bum (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Master’s program) lived up to the advice of Steve Jobs. He worked at Hyundai, one of Korea's leading companies, for three years, after which he quit his job to go on a world tour for a year to learn more about marketing, a field he truly wanted to engage in. After his life-changing trip, Kim managed to publish a book titled World Tour Plan Book with five other travelers. Kim Jung-bum (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Master’s program) talked about his life-changing expedition on August 29th, 2018. Before he left for his life-changing journey, he used to work at Hyundai from 2010 to 2013. “Hyundai is a dream company for many people out there. It did offer great pay. However, when I asked myself if I was enjoying myself at work, the answer was a 'no.'” He deeply felt that where he worked was very limited in terms of space and information. He felt the need for more insight in marketing, so he went on a tour to learn more about the automobile market industry. The book, World Tour Plan Book was written solely for those having trouble making plans and forming routes for their trip. Kim wrote about how to resolve the difficult problems people faced when going on a trip, and recommended ways to transport efficiently when traveling. “Since I, myself, have suffered the most over which route I should take, this book had to specifically include how you plan where you should go during your voyage.” The book includes pictures that were mostly taken by Kim and the co-authors themselves. The book has five more co-authors, all of whom were members of a Daum cafe named “World Tour Study.” The time and the places that the six authors traveled were all different in their form, but they realized that they know so much about where they visited that it was a waste not to write a book about their now new expertise. Kim traveled to 30 countries and 150 cities in just one year. For him, the different places he had visited had to do with countries where the automobile market was known to be advanced. Of course, he learned much more than just new information about the automobile industry. He saw sites of superb scenic beauty as well as the unique cultural heritages of many countries and met local people who looked at life a little differently from himself. “My real dream was to work in the sales department. A new dream I had earned from my worldwide tour was to become a consultant who helps people find out what kind of trip they desire, and ease any of their worries for the planned trip. I have achieved both of my dreams because I now work as an overseas technical salesman at a new company and also as a consultant at a company named Nextrip to help design the perfect trip for travellers.” (A link for more information) Kim is holding his book, the World Tour Plan Book, which contains many tips of all the key places, food, budget, transportation, and accommodations for a trip. “It’s shameful to say, but I think I was living my parent’s dream, not mine. After the journey, I was finally living my own life.” Kim recommended visiting a local university when travelling to a new country and having a talk with students there. He realized that by talking to university students that they had very different points of view when facing life struggles, and this opened Kim up in terms of having more alternative options when making life choices. Kim encouraged Hanyang students to be “as insane as you can be.” He went on to say, "if you are not crazy about something, you probably cannot do it." He emphasized the value of four years of university life. Being a student means you have open potential and limitless opportunities. “My journey was priceless in that it helped me think in a whole new way, and it also gave me time to know more about the good and bad about myself. I recommend that you experience it yourself by simply going on a trip.” Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-08 06

[Student]Passing the 34th Legislative Examination

There are many backbreaking exams that are difficult to pass in Korea, and one of the most notorious and competitive ones is the Legislative Examination (입법고시). Recording a passing rate of 352 to 1 in 2016, the exam seems challenging, if not impossible. On August 2, 2018, News H met with Shin Hong-cheol (Department of Public Administration, 4th year) who passed the 34th Legislative Examination. Shin Hong-cheol (Department of Public Administration, 4th year) seemed lighthearted and humorous throughout the interview. There are three different paths available for the legislative examination: general administrative official, law official, and finance and economy official. “I chose to try out for the general administrative official because I was always interested in the rights of minorities in society. A policy can be made only when basic human rights have a legal basis. I became interested in the legislative examination when I decided I wanted to support creating that legal basis of the fundamental rights,” Shin said. The first exam consists of the Public Service Aptitude Test (PSAT) and an English test which can be replaced by scores of official English tests. The biggest help that Shin received was from a study group formed in Hanyang University. The group was formed a month before the examination, meeting every single day from morning until night. The second part of the exam was a written essay test of five subjects. At school, the schedule is based on that of private educational institutes. In private institutes, it takes three months to have one rotation of studying the five subjects. They perform about three to four rotations in general. However, Shin thought that economics and administrative law were the two most important subjects, so he prepared for them every single day. He chose what he wanted to study later on, after the two crucial subjects were covered. “The rotation method that the private institutions and the school use is inefficient in my opinion, because they finish one subject after the other. You get tested for all five subjects. It is important that you don’t forget the previous subject that you studied,” said Shin. The final part of the legislative examination was the interview. One advantage at this point is that there are not many people competing, as most did not make it through the two prior tests. In addition, the interview groups are announced beforehand, which makes it easier to focus on practice interviews. The hardest part for Shin when preparing for the exam was his uncertainty about the future. There is only one chance a year open to participants, which makes it different from the regular path of finding employment. To overcome this uncertainty, Shin, who lived in the school dormitory, depended on his roommates. They cheered each other up by always preparing a nice, fulfilling meal together. “I believe that any kind of examination is an impartial system that allows you to be assessed on your ability and effort.” “Any kind of examination brings uncertainty. This is especially true when you are studying instead of preparing for finding a position like everyone else, so it is easy to get anxious which can get in the way of your studies. I received much help from the study groups of Hanyang University, and I believe that there are many great groups available for all kinds of exams. Also, the school provides us with online lectures that are much cheaper than those available at private institutes. I hope those preparing for an exam take full advantage of the benefits and support that the school offers.” Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju